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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 03:49 AM
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Feb 16: Unit 2 Data




www.tepco.co.jp...

www.tepco.co.jp...

www.tepco.co.jp...

RPV Bottom Part drop from 220 to 9 degrees...

www.tepco.co.jp...

D/W Pressure Slowly going up:
www.tepco.co.jp...

Hydrogen Volume:
www.tepco.co.jp...

- Purple Chive

edit on 16-2-2012 by Purplechive because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 03:58 AM
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Ocean Soil Rad Levels



www.tepco.co.jp...

- Purple Chive



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 04:04 AM
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From EX SKF. Mysterious Black Dust. WTF could that be.


Over 1 Million Bq/kg of Radioactive Cesium from the Mysterious Black Dust in Minami Soma City

Minami Soma City assemblyman Koichi Ooyama discloses the result of the test of the mysterious black dust found in locations in Minami Soma City, Fukushima Prefecture.

A blogger whom I featured before, "Night that never ends", has been measuring radiation on the strange, black dust he finds in many locations in Minami Soma City, mostly on the road surface. His geiger counter (Inspector) measures all alpha, beta, gamma radiations and x-ray, and his measurement on the surface of this black dust was 295 microsieverts/hour.

Assemblyman Ooyama apparently sent the sample to Professor Tomoya Yamauchi of Kobe University. Professor Yamauchi did the test, and here's the result, from Assemblyman Ooyama's blog:

Cs-134: 485,252 Bq/kg
Cs-137: 604,360 Bq/kg

TOTAL: 1,089,612 Bq/Kg

Converting the total number to Bq/square meter,

1,089,612 × 65 = 70,824,780 Bq/m2

"Night that never ends" says in his blog this substance is very light-weight and blows off easily. He is finding it all over Minami Soma. He has asked the construction workers if it is from asphalt used in roads. The workers say no. To see the image of this black dust, go here.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 04:16 AM
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Originally posted by Aircooled
I haven't popped into cryptome for a while because....there hasn't been any new pics. It seems some have been released.. It looks like they covered the truck entrace to #4, and we have some new scafolding here by the building with the blown tower, I can't remember its function? Dry cask also?



cryptome.org...
There are a few shots that look like they might reveal something. Note. They are still hiding the north wall of #4.


AC, the link is to an older series that you posted before and where the idea of the raised area initiated from. But the pic above is new, and I think thats the dry cask building like you say, but what are they building. And why there.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 07:31 AM
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reply to post by zworld
 


You know, one thing continues to bother me. Fuk II, 12 KM away, that they recently admitted "almost" suffered meltdowns.

We have nothing from there, no data, no conditions, no progress reports.

Maybe they are still releasing something into the environment, and not telling anyone about it, because no one is asking them what the situation is there.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 07:57 AM
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mdn.mainichi.jp...

Massive levels of radioactive cesium detected at quarry near Fukushima plant


Prefectural government workers check radiation levels at a quarry in Namie, Fukushima Prefecture, on Jan. 20. 2012. (Mainichi)

FUKUSHIMA -- Massive levels of radioactive cesium have been detected from gravel at a quarry near the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, after high radiation was detected at buildings using gravel from the same quarry, prefectural officials said.

The Fukushima Prefectural Government examined samples of the gravel from the quarry in the town of Namie after inspecting the site on Jan. 20.

Tests detected up to 214,200 becquerels of radioactive cesium per kilogram of gravel, far above the levels at other quarries operating in the evacuation zones around the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant. About 60,000-210,000 becquerels of cesium was found in most of the gravel that had been kept outdoors at the quarry since the disaster.

High radiation levels have been detected at apartment blocks and other construction projects built with gravel from the Namie quarry, and the findings lend further backing to the theory that this gravel was seriously contaminated with large amounts of cesium.

Among 25 quarries in the evacuation zones, up to 122,400 becquerels of radioactive cesium was found at one that has been closed since the nuclear crisis broke out on March 11, 2011. A high of 5,170 becquerels was found at one of 14 operational quarries within the evacuation zones.

The national and prefectural governments have done spot inspections of about 150 of some 1,100 construction sites where gravel from the Namie quarry is believed to have been used.

Higher levels of radiation than surrounding areas were detected at 27 locations in five towns and cities, including Nihonmatsu and the city of Fukushima. Of these, 22 were residences. The central and prefectural authorities are expected to finish their inspections by the end of March.

In a related development, the Economy, Trade and Industry Ministry held an expert panel meeting to consider standards for shipping gravel from quarries in the prefecture.

Noting that extraordinarily high levels of radiation were detected from only the Namie quarry, the experts said they recommended that the ministry only set standards for areas in Fukushima Prefecture where radiation levels remain high.

The ministry will work out the standards in March.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 08:20 AM
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Originally posted by zworld
From EX SKF. Mysterious Black Dust. WTF could that be.


Over 1 Million Bq/kg of Radioactive Cesium from the Mysterious Black Dust in Minami Soma City




I thought when i read it this comes from the heavy Work in Daiichi,
they are doing so much (according to the Roadmap)
and they remove Debris from Nr. 3 and 4. but do not daily spray
this green Binder!

We need a Spectrograph Analysis and i do not understand why the Towns
so close to the Plan, like Minami-Soma, do not have one already!

Tepco and/ or the Japanese Government need to pay for it of course,
when i would be the Headmen there i would do so,
i would even sale the House-Silver

edit on 16-2-2012 by Human0815 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:02 AM
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mdn.mainichi.jp...

High level of radioactive cesium found in Okinawa noodles

NAHA -- High levels of radioactive cesium have been detected in noodles produced in Okinawa, apparently because they were made with water filtered by ashes from Fukushima-produced wood.

The noodles, called "Okinawa soba," had a level of radioactivity of 258 becquerels of cesium per kilogram. The restaurant that produced them had kneaded them with water filtered by the ashes of Fukushima Prefecture-produced wood.

The Forestry Agency on Feb. 10 notified prefectures across Japan not to use ashes made from wood or charcoal in cooking if the materials were lumbered or produced in Fukushima Prefecture, Tokyo and 15 other prefectures following the outbreak of the Fukushima nuclear disaster in March last year, even if the wood or charcoal bore levels of cesium lower than the government-set standard -- 40 becquerels per kilogram for cooking wood and 280 becquerels per kilogram for charcoal.

According to the agency, the cesium contamination of Okinawan noodles surfaced on Feb. 7 in testing conducted by the Okinawa Prefectural Government. An ensuing survey found 468 becquerels of cesium in cooking wood that was distributed through the same route as the one for wood delivered to the restaurant.

The central government set a standard on Nov. 2 last year stating that the radioactivity of cesium concentrated by burning wood or charcoal should not exceed 8,000 becquerels per kilogram -- a level allowed for landfill at disposal sites. However, methods for examining the concentration were not established until Nov. 18, while the cooking wood in question was shipped on Nov. 7.

"We had not assumed that ashes would be used in food processing (when we drew up the standard)," said a Forestry Agency official.

Ashes are used in kneading noodles and sometimes in removing the bitter taste, or "aku" from devil's tongue and wild vegetables.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:54 AM
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Originally posted by Human0815

I thought when i read it this comes from the heavy Work in Daiichi,
they are doing so much (according to the Roadmap)
and they remove Debris from Nr. 3 and 4. but do not daily spray
this green Binder!

But what would they be doing to create a fine black dust many miles away that was visible. And why hasn't anyone else reported this black dust, or even seen it.

For the type of debris removal theyre doing now, heavy beams and crap on top of 3 and 4, this is sprayed many times with inhibitor. This inhibitor hardens each time they use it, encapsulating whatever dust was loose each time in a somewhat permanent fashion.

Im having trouble seeing it from Dai-ichi debris removal. It most certainly is from Dai-ichi, but how and what I dont know.

PS good eye on capturing the full segment of the fog layer.

Am still trying to identify why Yamaguchi is so high. Radon hotspot? Okinawa? Hmmmm?



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:54 AM
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The black dust is extensive in Minami-Soma and Soma City, and not Fukushima City or anywhere else it seems. At least not reported.

Airborne from Dai-ichi, a black dust, and its only found 20 to 25 km from the plant. Fukushima mystery number 2,367.

ON EDIT: One of the articles states that the dust emits high levels of alpha particles. alpha particles would only come from actinides like uranium, plutonium, americium etc. and not fission products.

They need to spec that stuff quick and get ratios.

Simplyinfo has a good read on the dust www.simplyinfo.org...

They think, since its found mainly on roads, that its crushed lava rock used for road traction that has been first contaminated from Dai-ichi, and then put on roads for traction in winter time and pulverized by road travel. Makes sense. It would also explain why it hasnt been found int he evac area, nobodies driving there.
edit on 16-2-2012 by zworld because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 11:00 AM
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Will the insanity ever end. Using college beauty queens as spokespeople for promoting the eating of contaminated food as part of a 'recovery program'. I can pretty much guarantee you that these lovely ladies just got a free year at the uni for their services.

I love the part about contaminating the younger generation "as they are the key to improving the food self-sufficiency". So much for protecting the health and quality of life for the future generations. More like improving hospital self-sufficiency, doctor self-sufficiency, cancer drug self-sufficiency. From EX SKF,



In the swearing-in ceremony at the Ministry in Kasumigaseki, Tokyo, Minister Michihiko Kano said to the students, "I would like you to play an active part with keen interest in food. I am looking forward to your effort to appeal the charm of domestically grown agricultural, forest and fishery products to the younger generation, as they are the key to improving the food self-sufficiency."

Upon being sworn in, each member spoke of their plans. Miss Seikei University (age 20) said, "I will eat food items from east Japan heartily". Miss Rikkyo Women's College (age 22) said enthusiastically, "I will come up with one desert a week using fruits from Tohoku, and eat it."



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 11:35 AM
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Wow, Ive never heard of this place. a common spent fuel pool. Must be something new


First mention of the CSFP in a long time. Almost forgot it exists.


At 10:02 am on February 16, we stopped cooling the common spent fuel pool due to the restoration of the station common diesel generation (A) (the temperature of the water in the pool at the time: 18.2 °C). We restarted cooling at 2:06 pm (the temperature of the water in the pool at the time: 19.0 °C).



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 12:47 PM
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Interesting explanation about the thermocouples from a guy who had to check these things at nuke plants. Dont know if its right but what else is new.


If thermocouples have one weakness it's this - moisture in their connecting wires.

A thermocouple is just two wires of dissimilar metals joined together at the end.
The dissimilar metals when heated produce tens of microvolts per degree , and one reads that miniscule voltage to infer temperature at the business end.

So in effect you have a microvolt source that's a function of(temperature) in series with the resistance of the wires . Most thermocouple wire has resistance that is substantially higher than copper. Make a thevenin equivalent out of that and measure it with instrument of your choice.

Now should the insulation of those wires get damaged and allow moisture to ingress,
you no longer have just a thermocouple, you also have dissimilar metals in an electrolyte which make a galvanic cell.
That places a galvanic cell electrically in parallel with your thermocouple junction.
Galvanic cells make thousands of microvolts not tens.
If there's enough wetted area on the moist part of the wires the galvanic cell will deliver enough current to overwhelm the thermocouple's meager voltage.
If you're lucky the polarity of the galvanic cell will cause a voltage indicating temperatures below freezing so you know immediately it's haywire.
If you're unlucky it makes a voltage that indicates high temperature and everybody wrings their hands until reading becomes impossibly high.

SO-- my point is this - they changed injection flow and one thermocouple departed from its neighbors. It bears watching but is suspect. I think they have a water leak above that thermocouple.

In my plant i checked for such things with a simple analog multimeter, which you dont ordinarily use on thermocouples.
The way you tell is read resistance, switch the polarity and read again. If the reading changes by more than about 1/4 inch needle deflection it's likely wet. (Modern digital meters dont have that reversing switch you have to swap the leads and infer from the numbers, which is much less intuitive)
Then you read the current it'll deliver into your multimeter on current scale and if it's more than a few microamps you know there's a substantial galvanic cell out there. If the thermocouple is the ungrounded type a simple resistance to earth confirms insulation damage



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 01:16 PM
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Pipes Breaking at North Anna? and What the Heck is a "Training Building"?



Sounds like radioactive sh!t to me!!


"At 12:44 on 2/15/2012, the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality was notified of a sewage system release that had the potential to reach state waters. On 2/14/2012, it was identified that water was flowing from a manhole cover near the North Anna training building. Further review identified the training building sewage lift station had lost power and that the water line in the manhole discharges to the lift station. It was estimated that approximately 120-200 gallons of untreated water reached the ground around the manhole before power was restored to the lift station. Upon further investigation, the station could not confirm whether untreated water reached Lake Anna."


Last entry in NRC notification:
www.nrc.gov...

- Purple Chive



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 04:11 PM
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Originally posted by zworld
Interesting explanation about the thermocouples from a guy who had to check these things at nuke plants. Dont know if its right but what else is new.


If thermocouples have one weakness it's this - moisture in their connecting wires.

A thermocouple is just two wires of dissimilar metals joined together at the end.
The dissimilar metals when heated produce tens of microvolts per degree , and one reads that miniscule voltage to infer temperature at the business end.

So in effect you have a microvolt source that's a function of(temperature) in series with the resistance of the wires . Most thermocouple wire has resistance that is substantially higher than copper. Make a thevenin equivalent out of that and measure it with instrument of your choice.

Now should the insulation of those wires get damaged and allow moisture to ingress,
you no longer have just a thermocouple, you also have dissimilar metals in an electrolyte which make a galvanic cell.
That places a galvanic cell electrically in parallel with your thermocouple junction.
Galvanic cells make thousands of microvolts not tens.
If there's enough wetted area on the moist part of the wires the galvanic cell will deliver enough current to overwhelm the thermocouple's meager voltage.
If you're lucky the polarity of the galvanic cell will cause a voltage indicating temperatures below freezing so you know immediately it's haywire.
If you're unlucky it makes a voltage that indicates high temperature and everybody wrings their hands until reading becomes impossibly high.

SO-- my point is this - they changed injection flow and one thermocouple departed from its neighbors. It bears watching but is suspect. I think they have a water leak above that thermocouple.

In my plant i checked for such things with a simple analog multimeter, which you dont ordinarily use on thermocouples.
The way you tell is read resistance, switch the polarity and read again. If the reading changes by more than about 1/4 inch needle deflection it's likely wet. (Modern digital meters dont have that reversing switch you have to swap the leads and infer from the numbers, which is much less intuitive)
Then you read the current it'll deliver into your multimeter on current scale and if it's more than a few microamps you know there's a substantial galvanic cell out there. If the thermocouple is the ungrounded type a simple resistance to earth confirms insulation damage


Yep, that makes perfect sense actually.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by zworld
 

Hey z... got your post about thermocouples...

SO-- my point is this - they changed injection flow and one thermocouple departed from its neighbors. It bears watching but is suspect. I think they have a water leak above that thermocouple.

There is more then one T/C affected at the bottom of #2. See my post last night about rising temperatures below the bottom head in the control rod drive housing (CRD). No one seems to have noticed that the (CRD) is also heating up:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

There are two T/C's not one... K? They tend to correlate each other. Especially since they are in such close proximity to each other at the bottom (even below the bottom) of #2 RPV. Your source also cites water as a problem for insulation thus giving false readings. Possible. Would tend to give erratic readings of a hi lo nature rather than steady rise or decline as water is boiled off and redeposited. So is radiation which affects the atomic structure of the T/C wire and may heat the insulation to a temperature that might cause it to burn off thus shorting the wires together and also causing false readings.

However T/C's for this environment are designed with heavy insulation that may involve asbestos, teflon and stainless steel mesh as shielding. They would have thought of this ahead of time as most of these T/C's are "temporary" measures installed at great risk to personnel and they really don't want to have to go back in there if they can help it. T/C technology is vast. The most demanding environments require the toughest materials. Radiation is at the top of the threat list because it passés thru any armor shielding or feed thru that man can construct and affects the wires directly thru decay.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 04:55 PM
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The earthquake triggered powerful tsunami waves that reached heights of up to 40.5 metres (133 ft) in Miyako in Tōhoku's Iwate Prefecture, and which, in the Sendai area, travelled up to 10 km (6 mi) inland. The earthquake moved Honshu 2.4 m (8 ft) east and shifted the Earth on its axis by estimates of between 10 cm (4 in) and 25 cm (10 in).

The tsunami caused a number of nuclear accidents, primarily the ongoing level 7 meltdowns at three reactors in the Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant complex, and the associated evacuation zones affecting hundreds of thousands of residents.














































And here we have an interesting video that ignores the question: what about the ongoing worldwide radiation poisoning with the no-end-in-sight-elephant in the room?


Operation Tomodachi (トモダチ作戦 tomodachi sakusen?, lit. "Operation Friend(s)") is a United States Armed Forces assistance operation to support Japan in disaster relief following the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. As of March 22, 2011, twenty US naval ships, 140 aircraft, and 19,703 Marines and Sailors were involved in humanitarian assistance and disaster relief efforts in and around Japan. By 29 March 2011, the operation, including relief supplies provided to victims of the disaster, was expected to cost a total of $80 million.




Riddle us this:



As we have always recommended to virtually anyone who will listen, "join ATS instead of lurking to enjoy an almost ad-free viewing experience," we lurked a bit the other day before signing in to get the feel of a non-member’s experience. (Not good.)

In perusing one of our fabulous threads, we innocently clicked on “nuclear power,” fully expecting a link to Babcock & Wilcox, Westinghouse, even G.E.

Can someone please explain the reasoning behind this pairing of “nuclear power” and “electric car?”

Or is it really the subliminal pairing of “nuclear power” and “Environmentally Friendly Solutions?”

Or is this merely a “random” pairing - a co-inkydink?

There are no co-inkydinks.




Mystery black substance has 1,000,000+ Bq/kg of cesium — Seen all over Minami Soma





The person who found it says in his blog this substance is very light-weight and blows off easily. He is finding it all over Minami Soma. He has asked the construction workers if it is from asphalt used in roads. The workers say no.


Uhhh, here in the backwoods of mountain Georgia, we’all call that soot.

If we recall correctly, Arnie warned long ago against burning the debris and causing more fallout (soot), significantly more concentrated by the burning process.

We, and they, were warned.

When is enough?

When will someone step in here and take control and attempt to solve this crisis instead of standing by the wayside and watch TEPCO, et al, blatantly rely on disinformation and obfuscation to blind the public to the true danger until something else happens to further call their hand?




16 February 2012
New docs show iodine-131 contamination was 350% of highest amount reported: 54,100 Bq/kg in spinach 100 km from Fukushima (FOIA)




20 January 2012
8 trillion becquerels of cesium found in pit of water at Reactor 2




10 January 2012
Jiji: 5 billion becquerels of beta radiation in 10 liters of decontaminated water — Includes strontium and cesium






[color=Cyan]click stargate

Peace Love Light
tfw
[align=center][color=magenta]Liberty & Equality or Revolution[/align]

edit on 16/2/2012 by thorfourwinds because: color



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 05:18 PM
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Human, or anyone, could this be translated please. Its the very first SPEEDI read-out, from 3/11 4PM to 5PM right after the tsunami struck. It shows a fair sized plume already being emitted. If this is true then meltdown was already in progress.

Im assuming SPEEDI has bouys or floats with monitoring equipment. Or they're flying the area for readings. Or are these simulations. If simulations, where did this data come from originally that they are basing the simulation on.




posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 06:11 PM
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Originally posted by intrptr
reply to post by zworld
 

Hey z... got your post about thermocouples...

There are two T/C's not one

I think that post might have been from before two were known. And actually there are three TCs acting up. The other 0 degree one at the bottom of the RPV is jumping around like a five pound catfish outa water. But if adding water is supposed to start a downward trend, then the CRD is the only one still functioning properly.

Myself, Im kinda going with the theory that none of the original instrumentation survived the meltdown. The more I go over data the more Im beginning to think they're all fried. How could they not be. 2800C melts everything pretty much. Of course that doesnt explain where the readings they are getting are coming from.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 07:36 PM
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Argh, I can't figure out how to upload a picture from my computer?? I translated the picture about two posts above... It should read:

大気中濃度 (ヨウ素)(地上高)  福島第一  一号機  境域図

airborne concentration (iodine) (above ground level) Fukushima Daiichi First Unit  Short-range map

日時 2011... etc

date and time

気象データ = GPV +  観測地 (2011 etc) まで

weather data = GPV + observed value (2011 etc) until

--

Hope that helps. Please note my Japanese sucks and should be treated as non-canonical. Hence why I've been on the DL... but smaller things I can translate. I'm self taught, for the purposes of one day going to Japan (now I can toss that dream out the window), and have a heavy fantasy/sci-fi oriented vocabulary... because that's what makes practice fun.
I can only be of practical use for smaller, written documents. I can cross-reference written things online, but for spoken videos, I have no solid point of reference if there is advanced vocabulary I don't know... so I can only be of limited help. (But with things like these, I can help.
)

Edit: so, in a nutshell, that map is about airborne concentrations of iodine. Z's assumptions are correct.
edit on 16-2-2012 by manicminxx because: (no reason given)

edit on 16-2-2012 by manicminxx because: (no reason given)

edit on 16-2-2012 by manicminxx because: (no reason given)

edit on 16-2-2012 by manicminxx because: (no reason given)




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