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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 1157.htm
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posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 08:59 PM
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NRC infighting ignited by Japanese nuke disaster, not Yucca Mountain standoff

By Karoun Demirjian

Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2011 | noon


www.lasvegassun.com/news/2011/dec/14/hearing/


Oversight committee Chairman Darrell Issa suggested in his report that the discord among members of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission originated with the standoff over the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository.

But no one mentioned Yucca Mountain, except in passing, at this morning’s hearing to examine NRC chairman Greg Jaczko’s conduct. And when asked about it, even the commissioner who Issa said had been strong-armed said the issue hadn't triggered the discord this time.

“That was a big debate last year, there were clearly different views on both sides. But I don’t think that that’s lingering. It didn’t even come up,” said Commissioner William Magwood, a Democrat appointed by President Barack Obama in 2010. “It was an issue, it was a big debate, but I don’t see it as a big debate that broke relationships. I mean after that was done, we moved on to other things and there really was no lasting impact.”

Magwood and three other NRC commissioners wrote a letter to White House Chief of Staff Bill Daley in October complaining that Jaczko’s leadership was “causing serious damage to this institution” and that Jaczko had “intimidated and bullied” staff to the degree that he has created a high level of fear and anxiety resulting in a chilled work environment.”

(...)




posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 09:00 PM
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Concerning decontamination and the rush to move people back into Fukushima prefecture, this is from David Chanin the guy Langley mention above, and he appears to be an excellent resource. This is from an article he did on March 18. Note he says "safe and stable". To me that means that he considered a meltdown occurring and past the point of being able to one day achieve "cold shutdown". I may be reading into it too much though.


There are only two countries in the world which can truly claim to have the experienced personnel and capabilities to conduct (or attempt) environmental restoration of a large radioactive site, such as will be absolutely necessary in Japan after the six units at Fukushima, and all on-site spent fuel, are rendered safe and stable.

Russia has this distinction because it had 25 years to learn the lessons of Chernobyl, where, through trial and error, mostly error, they found that the cleanup of fission products from inhabited areas is practically impossible without the almost complete destruction, removal, and disposal of the affected property and surface soil.


ON EDIT: In other words, you take it all, scrape everything above ground into oblivion, all the trees and fields, all the houses, all the rivers, all the memories gone. Then you bring in soil, plant new trees and new flowers, and build new homes. Then you pray that the mountains and forests and soils all around you dont bleed and exude future contaminants to a level that force the process to be done again.

what you dont do is tell people to smile and radiation wont bother you, and then go back home because govt subsidies are going to run out if you dont.
edit on 14-12-2011 by zworld because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 09:09 PM
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Fukushima N-Plant Should Be Nationalized: Ex-Prem. Hatoyama

jen.jiji.com/jc/eng?g=eco&k=2011121400878


Tokyo, Dec. 15 (Jiji Press)--Former Japanese Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama and a ruling party lawmaker proposed Thursday that the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant should be nationalized to have independent scientists find out whether the worst-case scenario occurred there.

The Tokyo Electric Power Co. plant, devastated by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, "must be nationalized so that information can be gathered openly," Hatoyama of the ruling Democratic Party of Japan and DPJ lawmaker Tomoyuki Taira, said in an article in the British science magazine Nature. Both are members of the House of Representatives.

"Particularly important" is finding out whether recriticality, or the restart of self-sustaining nuclear reactions in the reactor core, occurred, Hatoyama and Taira said, questioning the analyses by TEPCO and the industry ministry's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency. They said the evidence of recriticality is still "inconclusive."

Citing TEPCO's view that molten fuel may have eaten through three- quarters of the concrete under the No. 1 reactor, they said "similarly unconfirmed" is how much of the concrete base under the reactor has been breached.

If the concrete below the reactor has cracked, radioactive materials could leak into the groundwater, they said.

Hatoyama and Taira also underlined the need to find out whether the explosions at the plant after the quake were nuclear in origin, referring to findings by the science ministry of heavy radioactive substances such as plutonium at distant places.

"Whether a hydrogen explosion would have been powerful enough to scatter heavy metals that far remains unclear," it said, citing other possibilities, such as a nuclear explosion and the ignition of other gases.

They also said that half-century processes to decommission the reactors "must be based on the worst-case scenario."

A special science council should be established to help scientists work together on the analyses, they said in the article.

(2011/12/15-03:00)

Copyright 2011 Jiji Press LTD



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 09:15 PM
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I just watched the latest Arnie video and he said that the blob is cooling down, no more new reactions are happening inside of it...

How does this contrast to the fact that I-131 keeps popping up, and there is an increase in both the intensity and duration of radiation level spikes tested in multiple places in North America at the same time?

My understanding is very basic, I apologize.

Big thanks to everyone again...



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 09:35 PM
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Originally posted by manicminxx
I just watched the latest Arnie video and he said that the blob is cooling down, no more new reactions are happening inside of it...

How does this contrast to the fact that I-131 keeps popping up, and there is an increase in both the intensity and duration of radiation level spikes tested in multiple places in North America at the same time?

My understanding is very basic, I apologize.

Big thanks to everyone again...



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 09:57 PM
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This is the article from Chanin that Paul Langley is refering to

www.gplus.com...


TEPCO Data Shows Ongoing Criticalities Inside Leaking Fukushima Daiichi Unit 2

Analysis Of
Press Release (Apr 28,2011) Detection of Radioactive Materials from Subsurface Water near the Turbine Building

April 28, 2011

Premise

Data released on April 28, 2011 by TEPCO is now unequivocal in showing ongoing criticalities at Unit 2, with a peak on April 13. TEPCO graphs of radioactivity-versus-time in water under each of the six reactors show an ongoing nuclear chain reaction creating high levels of "fresh" I-131 in Unit 2, the same reactor pressure vessel (RPV) with a leak path to reactor floor, aux building, and outdoor trenches, that is uncontrollably leaking high levels of I-131, Cs-134, Cs-137 into the Pacific Ocean.

Discussion

When a nuclear reactor goes "critical" it means that the fissioning of U-235 or Pu-239 becomes a self-sustaining process, called a chain reaction, where fissile material hit by a neutron then spilts (or fissions) into two atoms with atomic numbers between ~90 and ~140 while "throwing off" a few neutrons which then hit other fissile atoms and so the reaction then continues until it's stopped, usually by dropping the control rods, or reactor scram.

During normal reactor operation, short-lived nuclides like I-131 (8 day) that pose high radiological hazard decay as quickly as they are created, because its halflife is much shorter than the refueling cycle, so I-131 reaches an equilibrium value quickly. In contrast, because the cesiums decay slower than they are created, reactor inventories of Cs-134 (2 year) and Cs-137 (30 year) gradually rise during the cycle, reaching a maximum at end of cycle.

When Units 1-3 were all scrammed on March 11,  2011 from earthquake-caused station blackout, the chain reaction of splitting fissile U-235 and Pu-239 into numerous fission products came to an immediate stop. Reactor scram means that neutron-absorbing control rods are dropped into the reactor core to absorb enough neutrons that the chain reaction ceases. Because I-131 has no long-lived "parent" to "feed it" by parent decay, the levels of I-131 in scrammed reactors with intact geometry will decrease exponentially with an 8-day halflife, meaning that after 5 halflives (40 days) the I-131 levels are only 3% of what they were at scram.

But instead of seeing that expected decrease in I-131 levels relative to Cs-134 and Cs-137 in the regular TEPCO press releases, I-131 was seen to be increasing, instead of decreasing as the physics said it should.

Until the April 28 press release with accompanying graphs and table, I discerned that something strange was happening with the elevated I-131 levels, but until this latest news, it was impossible to know where, exactly, was the source of the high I-131 levels.

The answer is clear if you look at the graphs of groundwater radioactivity measurements from all six reactors. "Outlier" Unit 2 has I-131 levels roughly 20 times its levels of Cs-134/137. The only possible source of I-131 would be "pockets" of molten core in the Unit 2 RPV settled in such a way that the boron in the injected water is insufficient to stop the localized criticalities.


And a week earlier or so

www.gplus.com...

edit on 14-12-2011 by zworld because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 10:52 PM
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A great report from our MsMilky.



posted on Dec, 15 2011 @ 12:26 AM
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1st Fukushima town assembly held locally after evacuation

IWAKI, Japan, Dec. 15, Kyodo


english.kyodonews.jp/news/2011/12/131674.html


The town assembly of Hirono, Fukushima Prefecture, on Thursday became the first of the nine municipalities whose administrative functions were relocated following the Fukushima nuclear crisis to hold a regular meeting back on home ground.

Located within a zone 20 to 30 kilometers from the crisis-hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, the town with a population of about 5,300 held assembly sessions twice in the neighboring Iwaki city before the evacuation advisory was lifted in September.

The nuclear accident had forced Hirono and eight other offices of towns and villages in Fukushima to move their functions to different locations.

The Hirono government aims to decontaminate the town so that all the residents can return home by the end of next year. The assembly says it wants to take the lead in promoting the process of return.

Copyright 2011 Kyodo News



posted on Dec, 15 2011 @ 12:27 AM
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Japan, U.S. hold nuclear disaster drill in Yokosuka

YOKOHAMA, Dec. 15, Kyodo


english.kyodonews.jp/news/2011/12/131677.html


Japan and the United States held a joint nuclear disaster drill Thursday in Kanagawa Prefecture under the scenario of a leakage of radioactive substances from the U.S. nuclear-powered aircraft carrier George Washington.

About 180 people, including officials in charge of disaster prevention from Japan's Foreign Ministry and Defense Ministry, the Yokosuka municipal government, the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Embassy, took part in the drill at the U.S. naval base in Yokosuka, southwest of Tokyo.

The event was based on the assumption of water containing radioactive materials leaking from a pipe on the carrier, causing some crew members to be exposed to radiation.

In the drill, the U.S. military transported the crew members to a hospital on the base for treatment, while Yokosuka city officials dispatched liaison staffers to the base to confirm procedures such as the method of promptly sharing information between the Japanese and U.S. sides.

Japan and the United States have held joint drills every year since 2007, and this year's event saw the participation of local medical representatives to treat people exposed to radiation for the first time, in the wake of the nuclear crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant that was triggered by the March earthquake and tsunami.

Copyright 2011 Kyodo News



posted on Dec, 15 2011 @ 12:47 AM
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Have something I was hoping someone here could help out with.


(click thumbnail for larger image)

I am hoping someone will be able to identify what these are, and tell me that they're not what I think they could be.

ETA: they are a bit bigger than railroad taker cars.
edit on 15-12-2011 by jadedANDcynical because: more detail



posted on Dec, 15 2011 @ 02:34 AM
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Gov't admits nuclear substances found in waste, unreported to IAEA

mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/national/archive/news/2011/12/15/20111215p2g00m0dm145000c.html


TOKYO (Kyodo) -- The Japanese government admitted Thursday that nuclear substances have been found in the waste of domestic facilities subject to International Atomic Energy Agency inspection, but left unreported to the U.N. nuclear watchdog.

Top government spokesman Osamu Fujimura said in a news conference that the matter will be reported to the IAEA soon, but did not say how much nuclear material was involved.

The chief Cabinet secretary said an investigation last year of records led to the discovery of nuclear substances that were unaccounted for in waste at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency's Oarai Research and Development Center in Ibaraki Prefecture.

(...)

(Mainichi Japan) December 15, 2011



posted on Dec, 15 2011 @ 07:49 AM
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Critical mass



Many times in Japan's recent history, the government has handed responsibility for dealing with issues involving tricky scientific concepts to bureaucrats or politicians.
All too often, these officials, not understanding the issues, do what governments shouldn't do — hide the problem and hope it will go away. In the meantime, politicians fumble for answers, while ill-informed government spokespeople tell confused stories that can make them look foolish, irresponsible or deceitful.

This is how the government handled Minamata disease caused by industrial mercury poisoning in the 1950s and 60s, the HIV-tainted blood products problem in the 1980s, and the BSE scare of a decade ago. And now it is how it has handled Fukushima. Fear of spreading panic, for example, prevented warnings being issued on the dangers of radiation predicted by simulations. As a result, more residents than necessary were exposed.
-------------------------
Japan could start by following the example of countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom, and take on a science adviser. Five years ago, Japan did claim to establish such a system, installing a scientist as a special adviser to the cabinet (see Nature 443, 734–735; 2006).

But that was based more on hopes of encouraging innovation than dealing with the broad range of scientific issues that a proper science adviser takes on — and the experiment lasted only two years. Now there is no science adviser. Efforts to give the Science Council of Japan a more influential role, akin to the US National Academy of Sciences, have also come up short (see Nature 428, 357; 2004).

Japan can do better. The Japanese people deserve better.

www.nature.com...

Japan May Declare Control of Reactors, Over Serious Doubts



On Friday, a disaster-response task force headed by Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda will vote on whether to announce that the plant’s three damaged reactors have been put into the equivalent of a “cold shutdown,” a technical term normally used to describe intact reactors with fuel cores that are in a safe and stable condition.

Experts say that if it does announce a shutdown, as many expect, it will simply reflect the government’s effort to fulfill a pledge to restore the plant’s cooling system by year’s end and, according to some experts, not the true situation. If the task force declares a cold shutdown, the next step will be moving the spent fuel rods in nearby cooling pools to more secure storage, and eventually opening the reactors themselves.

However, many experts fear that the government is declaring victory only to appease growing public anger over the accident, and that it may deflect attention from remaining threats to the reactors’ safety. One of those — a large aftershock to the magnitude 9 earthquake on March 11, which could knock out the jury-rigged new cooling system that the plant’s operator hastily built after the accident — is considered a strong possibility by many seismologists.

www.nytimes.com...

U.S. should learn lessons from Fukushima, keep nuke plants: daily



"The Japanese disaster showed that it's crucial to try to imagine the unimaginable," the paper said in its editorial titled, "Japan's nuke meltdown shouldn't close U.S. plants."

While Germany responded to the Fukushima Daiichi disaster by moving to phase out nuclear power generation, the United States should not follow suit, it said.

www.nytimes.com...



posted on Dec, 15 2011 @ 10:01 AM
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Originally posted by Human0815
Japan could start by following the example of countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom, and take on a science adviser.

Obviously who ever wrote that article wasnt aware that our science advisors have all bee pro nuke, pro pollution an pro biz. Holdren, the current one, is possibly the worst of the lot. What good is an advisor if they are nothing more than industry lackeys. In the end its just more doublespeak from an 'expert'. And you end up with concepts like this one;


U.S. should learn lessons from Fukushima, keep nuke plants: daily



"The Japanese disaster showed that it's crucial to try to imagine the unimaginable," the paper said in its editorial titled, "Japan's nuke meltdown shouldn't close U.S. plants."

While Germany responded to the Fukushima Daiichi disaster by moving to phase out nuclear power generation, the United States should not follow suit, it said.


Japan should learn from America who is learning from Japan that nukes are OK. And I wonder why Im so confused these days.



posted on Dec, 15 2011 @ 10:13 AM
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If you live along the west coast of US/Canada keep your eyes out for debris on the beaches. "Theyre here". From www.peninsuladailynews.com...

PORT ANGELES — The first piece of debris that could be identified as washing up on the West Coast from the March 11 tsunami in Japan — a large black float — was found on a Neah Bay beach two weeks ago, Seattle oceanographers Curtis Ebbesmeyer and Jim Ingraham said Tuesday night.

Since then, the two researchers, known as DriftBusters Inc. — who have used flotsam to track wind and water currents in the Pacific since 1970 — have learned that the black, 55-gallon drum-sized floats also have been found on Vancouver Island.

About a quarter of the 100 million tons of debris from Japan is expected to make landfall on beaches from southern Alaska to California, possibly in volumes large enough to clog ports, Ebbesmeyer said.



posted on Dec, 15 2011 @ 01:42 PM
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Some interesting film from a plant worker at fuk. Maybe human can translate a few interesting highlights of what is being said.

And it rained here in eastern Ontario so I did the winshield-wipe rain check at 11am Dec 15th. I have been asking folks on FB to explain to me, just what my numbers mean. We all have to learn and understand this stuff, right? According to a friend, when I got 1.09 micro-sieverts on Nov 27th, he said if I stood out in that rain for an hour, I would get roughly a years worth of rads.

I'm not totally surprised. The guy in Colorado got these numbers two days ago, and his weather would normally swoop under the great lakes and follw the St Lawrence seaway up to the Maritimes and New England.

J+C, looks like a Soylent Green plant.



posted on Dec, 15 2011 @ 02:26 PM
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reply to post by qmantoo
 


On this thread we have discussed many things, and I know there has been discussion on the historical aspects of nuclear energy in Japan and how some USA organisations were manipulating the situation. Well, now there is a book from the modern Japanese point of view from which may shed extra light on the cause of the war with japan and the events in that area afterwards.

In case anyone is interested in the background The Yomiuri Shimbun has published a book.
From Marco Polo Bridge to Pearl Harbor - WHO WAS RESPONSIBLE?

Thank you Q, I am one of the interested parties that looks at that aspect of history as very important. Why Japan went to war and developed post war era is very dependent upon some very specific actions by my country. The US of A is not unblemished in that regard. Having said that, any book that gets reviewed by Kissinger ( the biggest liar of them all) is suspect in my mind. Thanks for the info though... If my posts have a bent it will be that we invented the technology that the world calls "Nuclear Power" and I am right ashamed about that. What a mess... sorry 'bout that.



posted on Dec, 15 2011 @ 03:34 PM
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Hello all, yes I am still alive. Sorry had some health issues and been too busy to post for a while but been glancing in every once and a while, good work! Ya'll rock!

Z, great forensic analysis to-date, will add some alternate points in soon upcoming post.

Glad to see some new posters, I do encourage everyone who hasn't yet had the time, it is very worthwhile to go back through some of the early analysis in this thread anywhere in the pages approx 300-600+ range, you will be amazed at how insightful and accurate it has proven to be. Especially in light of the new imagery AC and others are digging up. There has been an enormous legacy of knowledge and insight in this thread that isn't limited to just the last few hundred pages or so.


Originally posted by jadedANDcynical
Have something I was hoping someone here could help out with.


(click thumbnail for larger image)

I am hoping someone will be able to identify what these are, and tell me that they're not what I think they could be.

ETA: they are a bit bigger than railroad taker cars.
edit on 15-12-2011 by jadedANDcynical because: more detail


JC they look like regular grain cars to me. It's hard to see from the distance, but the walls of those containers do not look as reinforced (thick) as other typical rail transport shipping casks for nuke waste.


(click for larger image)

How they are loaded and placed on the cars is usually done in a highly controlled environment. It varies per country, but there are strict regulations regarding the types of casks that can be used (impact and bomb resistant etc) and how they can be loaded etc. Depending on the type of waste they are carrying, rods/pellets/soil/clothing/medical/liquid etc will also determine the heaviness of load. The degree of radioactivity of the waste determines amount of shielding that the container must have, and waste can't be transported at all if it is to thermally hot. All transported waste must be secured via heavy security (usually) and loaded and offloaded at secure facilities.


(click for larger image)

The photo of that yard you posted looks far too open and unsecure for loading, but they could be storing casks there although it is unlikely they would be stored in such an open manner.

This is a shot of some more rectangular looking waste casks (Britan)

(click for larger image)

From this Wiki

Are you sure they aren't grain cars? I can't tell if they are larger than normal. Where was the shot taken? It looks like a typical grain yard to me.




posted on Dec, 15 2011 @ 04:47 PM
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Originally posted by Wertwog

Hello all, yes I am still alive.

Great to hear from you again Wertwog. Was wondering if you wuz OK.

Ive been forced to read the old stuff as I do the report, dammit,
and yes, it is nothing short of amazing the knowledge that was posted here. By far, way ahead of the curve. and I hope to condense a chunk of it, but of course it will be way condensed, and I, too, recommend going back, but start right from page 1. It goes pretty fast now that I understand so much about this whole shebang. At least for me I dont have to read each post slowly hoping I can understand like I once did.

Anyway, hope all is well and welcome home.



posted on Dec, 15 2011 @ 05:18 PM
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This isn't a fair headline. From Fukushima Diary;

Tokyo people as guinea pigs

Mochizuki is referring to the incineration they are doing at Onagawa NPP. The headline should read,

'Pacific Ocean and west coast of the America's used as guinea pigs'

, because thats where the contamination is going, not Japan. They picked Onagawa and this time of year to incinerate because the prevailing winds will blow the radiation over the ocean and across the seas, where the milk toast kiss arse US govt will gladly ignore the threat cause its like so insignificant and havent you heard about bananas and besides the story says Tokyo.

THIS IS ONE MORE CRIMINAL ACTION, AND THE CRIMINALS ARE THE JAPANESE GOVERNMENT, THE US GOVERNMENT AND THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT. FUG EM ALL!!!!!!

edit on 15-12-2011 by zworld because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2011 @ 07:20 PM
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It is here!!!


Tsunami debris landing on Washington coast as we speak.
I put a warning out on my facebook page. Pray parents keep the kids out of it and do not drag it home.
Rbrtj



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