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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Sep, 1 2011 @ 11:01 PM
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reply to post by Silverlok
 


Holy schmokes! I know a tinsy bit about floating grounds; my dad was a plant supervisor for a large 4 unit power plant and worked in the utility for over 40 years, even though he's been retired for a good number of years now he still knows about electricity and it's use, transmission, generation, etc.

I do remember him emphasizing how dangerous floating grounds were, something about instability in flow direction and being more susceptible to radio interference. It's been a *long* time since I've heard him talking about that. I need to ask him again.

Oh, and as far as earthquakes go, what do they know and when do they know it?




posted on Sep, 2 2011 @ 12:10 AM
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reply to post by Silverlok
 

I've had haggis... not as bad as you think! Kinda like sausage with oats.

Okies, putting things together that perhaps don't play nicely with each other:

1. Contributing to the weakening of the 'sandstone/mudstone' underneath the reactors. Silver did you read the posts around the Finn's theory... around p1030/31-34. He's either got some marbles loose or some think he's on to something. He suggests neutron weakening of the sandstone impacts the methane clutter layer could be cause of #4 explosion - speculated.
2. Metal corrosion accelerated, add to that Cl-38 . Can't be good. Analysis .. transient criticality...time machine
Just a taste..


[...snip]
Assuming that the TEPCO measurements are correct,this analysis seems to indicate that we cannot discount the possibility that there was another strong neutron source during the time that the workers were sending seawater into the core of reactor #1. However, without knowing the details of the configuration of the core and how the seawater came in contact with the fuel, it is difficult to be certain. Given these uncertainties it is nonetheless important for TEPCO to be aware of the possibility of transient criticalities when work is being done; otherwise workers would be in considerably greater danger than they already are when trying to working to contain the situation. A transient criticality could explain the observed 13“neutron beams” reported by Kyodo news agency (see above). This analysis is not a definitive proof, but it does mean that we cannot rule out localized criticality and TEPCO should assure that the workers take the necessary precautions.

add to that unstable S-35 radioactive atmospheric sulfur
3. Heavy atmospheric ionization, charged particles, loads of moisture, floating ground = hmmmm. I don't know but if I had to work there I'd be wearing rubber booties under my radiation suit!



posted on Sep, 2 2011 @ 01:26 AM
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It seems we have a couple of new images from Cryptome. Pic 1: Aug 29 T-hawk flying past #1 Pic 2: Aug 29 Zoom on #2 east side ladder. Pic #3: Aug 29 zoom on #2 opening. Is this suppose to be a ladder?




And the link.
cryptome.org...



posted on Sep, 2 2011 @ 02:21 AM
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The whole strange picture of #2 fom Aug 29th. The pink bed sheet covering something inside. The TV tower ladder tied off, and the plastic jugg.....for sampling? ...something? Also a zoom on #1. Would that be the larger crane on the right side?


And a zoom of the area North of #1




posted on Sep, 2 2011 @ 05:02 AM
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Yes, useful pics.

This old image worries me.

The idea that Tepco was floating was that this brown line is a 'high-tide mark' caused by the (dirty,oily) water of the tsunami making a mark on the building. This is 'evidence' for the height of the tsunami.

When does water create a flat straight line? When it is calm and standing still, you answer. Thats right. But if the tsunami water was rushing from left to right or from right to left, is it likely that is will hang around long enough to become flat and calm so that it can make the straight oily dirty line on the building ?


Actually, there are 3 straight brown lines on that building shown by the arrows and the red arrows show the continuing brown high-tide-line going round the corner.

Am I making a poor assumption that only flat water can create a straight line like that? Not just one, but three straight lines!

The area to the right in this image appears like a more open space and would not impede the water or cause it to hang around and IF the water was going from left to right in this image, the surge would even out into the open space.



This is the sea we are talking about, not some sunny calm lake but a tsunami causing lots of damage and supposedly moving heavy vehicles about.


Not quite sure about that car up there. There are too many cranes about on this site and the height of the railings around that white tank must be 15-20 feet high. It is possible it was moved there by the sea I suppose.

Then there's this I found the other day, which suggests that the water was hanging around - at least inside buildings.
(looks like someone had a late night curry after drinking too much)



posted on Sep, 2 2011 @ 05:24 AM
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In the image from #2, the access ladder to the roof has been ripped apart. I mean one section of it has been completely destoyed about 10 feet from the top and the lower sections bent and buckled maybe by the tsunami debris(?)

How did the top part become so damaged like that? That is really strange. Any theories?

Too high for tsunami and unlikely to be caused by any explosion unless some projectile thing swept the top section away. That ladder must be fairly strong and attached securely to the building since men have to climb up there to get to the roof.

The Heath-Robinson effort with the jug is to get samples of something inside the building window. Posssibly the spent fuel pool water? What is there behind that opening?



posted on Sep, 2 2011 @ 07:06 AM
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This is an image from July 1st from Tepco, one we have seen before.

It shows the Main Process Building south of R4, but look what is on the roof and above it.

I reckon "they" are keeping an eye on proceedings - just to make sure everything is going according to the Master Plan.


The red arrow points to what I assume is some kind of radio aerial on top of that building. It looks more like one of those fairly high powered receiving station aerials rather than a normal single whip aerial used to send/receive from walkie-talkies around the site.. There are plenty of those about on the tops of reactors. So what is this one for?


The green arrowed thingamee I dont know what it is, but, to me, it does not look the same as the others (blue and pink arrows).

Of course, they could just be dead pixels highly magnified, couldn't they?



posted on Sep, 2 2011 @ 07:14 AM
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Sunset at fuk....Well at least the one in the sky.
www.youtube.com.../u/2/nTEIn_sSlCw
And the sequel. [1 hour compressed into 3 minutes]
www.youtube.com.../u/1/qNhSIw1CoCQ



posted on Sep, 2 2011 @ 08:11 AM
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reply to post by qmantoo
 


Q, from a post I made on page 903:

Originally posted by jadedANDcynical

snip

The following is a series from the security cams (that have been the subject of much debate) taken during the arrival of the tsunami:





You can see how much destruction the water was able to wreak. If you look through the report, you will notice that I skipped a few in the sequence. I felt that their inclusion would not substantially lessen the impact of the existing photos.

In the following image you will find a screencap of page 37 of the report (it's a 87 pages long). You will notice that the highest level of tesunami the plant was designed for (5.7 meters) was nearly tripled by the actual tsunami height (14-15 meters) where the site level of the reactors is 10 meters. This resulted in an inundation height for the area immediately surrounding the reactors of 4-5 meters.


I would really like to see some of our more technically minded posters take a look at the report and see what else can be gleaned form it's pages.


This is the area you show with the vehicle lodged between the tank and the building.

Depending on how long it took the water to recede, there would have been plenty of time for the surface to calm enough to leave the lines you indicate. And the water, when it did recede, would not have had the same force going out to sea as it had coming in. There obviously would have been tons and tons of various type of debris in the wave, so I would be surprised to see no debris left scattered about the site (including within buildings) rather than what that image shows (of the "bad curry" on top of the pipes etc).



posted on Sep, 2 2011 @ 10:15 AM
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A screen capture from this Aug 16th computer animation of the Fujiuma reservoir letting go. It might be worth the time to dig around this channel. Might be some insight into the Geo.
www.youtube.com...



posted on Sep, 2 2011 @ 10:25 AM
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Originally posted by Purplechive

My apologies, off topic post...but doesn't this look familiar...

More pics...
onwingsofcare.org... oil.html

______beforeitsnews/story/1032/923/Oil_Slicks_Sighted_Yesterday_16_Miles_from_BP_Deepwater_Horizon_Spill_Site.html


That is down right depressing. I knew they were having more trouble down there, but not that much. That is something that an honest govt agency (i know seems like an oxymoron) would be all over BP screaming bloody murder for allowing the spill to continue without notifying anyone.

We feared early on in the disaster that there would be continued problems due to the fact that the Macondo site was in one of the biggest methane hydrate (MH) fields ever discovered, and even after capping there was going to be movement within the field. And it does tie into Fukushima because MH may have exacerbated the tsunami. My MH report, and NP report, can be read here www.heartthrobsschipperkes.com... thanks to Susan at the EQ swarm thread. In the MH report i detail how MH has caused tsunamis in the past, usually triggered by an EQ.



posted on Sep, 2 2011 @ 10:56 AM
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Originally posted by Silverlok
In fact they are almost certainly effecting (disrupting) the Tesla-Schumann resonance cavity in the local area

one example of it is the cranes on Seattle's waterfront absorbing radio frequencies and discharging them as electrical arcs.



Thank you SL. That makes sense as to the recent weird arcing, and maybe even lends new ways of looking at the light shows weve seen from time to time in the area of R3 and R4 and the CSFP on the webcam. I think I remember the Tesla-Schumann resonance from Tesla's work on his EQ machine. If memory serves it applies to anything, yes, everything has it's own frequency, not just the earth. Im going to look into this more as it applies to Fuku.

Where's Tessy when we really need him.



posted on Sep, 2 2011 @ 11:10 AM
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Originally posted by Aircooled
Sunset at fuk....Well at least the one in the sky.
www.youtube.com.../u/2/nTEIn_sSlCw
And the sequel. [1 hour compressed into 3 minutes]
www.youtube.com.../u/1/qNhSIw1CoCQ


Thats the brightest light up I think we've seen so far. Some big work project and once again the lighting is brightest over the CSFP area. yet they never talk about this work in their press releases. I'll bet that Tepco and the military complete this work just before day light when the contract workers start showing up, so the contract workers dont have a clue as to whats going on.

Sure would be nice if soneone snuck some pics out of what they are doing at night in that area. Pretty please with sugar on it.



posted on Sep, 2 2011 @ 11:24 AM
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Originally posted by qmantoo
Yes, useful pics.

This old image worries me.





The perfectly straight line in the middle is the one I dont understand. This was obviously caused by one of the later tsunamis (if memory serves there were 8 pulses, but its been awhile). But why would a later pulse leave such a darker imprint than the main earlier ones.

Plus I tend to agree that if the water was rushing from the right to the left in the picture that it would have left a surge line in the top one and it wouldnt be perfectly straight either. If the water was rushing from background to foreground though, a straight line makes more sense, as it wouldnt be affected by the surge. thats just a knee jerk reaction though.

As to the car, I believe that is just a new way of parking in Japan as space is so limited. Brilliant idea yes?. (Just kidding of course).



posted on Sep, 2 2011 @ 02:17 PM
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Gov't releases most detailed maps yet of radiation around Fukushima plant



The Japanese government has released new maps of radiation around the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant, the most detailed yet. The maps show radiation levels in the 20-kilometer no-entry zone around the plant, as well as areas outside that zone that were ordered evacuated.

Radiation levels are given for one centimeter and one meter aboveground for 2,696 locations, generally one location for every 500 by 500 meters. Some very high radiation levels were recorded, the highest of which was 139 microsieverts per hour at one meter above the ground in the town of Okuma, just south of the plant. The highest level at one centimeter above the ground was 368 microsieverts per hour in Futaba, just north of the plant. According to the maps, radiation levels of 19 microsieverts per hour or higher were detected between the plant and four to five kilometers to the south, west and northwest of the plant.

More:

Noda to sway Japan to switch on nuclear reactors



Japan's new prime minister has made clear he sees nuclear power playing a part in energy supply for decades - so one of his first challenges is to convince a sceptical public to allow shut reactors to restart. Yoshihiko Noda inherits a country with no cohesive energy policy after the March earthquake and tsunami triggered the world's worst nuclear accident in 25 years and shattered the public's confidence in the safety of its reactors.

Noda, approved by parliament as the sixth prime minister in five years, will need to overhaul a plan that before the disaster sought to boost the role of nuclear to meet 50% of power supply by 2030 from what was 30%. In the short term, the new prime minister needs to convince the public that it is safe to restart reactors that have shut down for routine maintenance.

Reactors far from the disaster zone have been kept shut by local officials mindful of growing public concern. "Looking at the harsh reality, the best option now is to restart idled nuclear power plants upon confirming their safety," Noda wrote in an essay published this month in the Japanese current affairs magazine Bungei Shunju. Those that failed stress tests examining their ability to withstand future disasters should be closed, he said, but nuclear must remain part of the energy mix for several decades. Noda has acknowledged that building new plants is unlikely given public worries after the nuclear crisis at Fukushima.

Source



posted on Sep, 2 2011 @ 02:33 PM
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reply to post by qmantoo
 


Nice spotting. Gamma strike should not have a dark ring usually.

They say the dark part is an ionized field around the exterior. Probably part of the problem they cause for electrical circuits.

Been wanting to post this for ages.



Can't notice obvious keyframing issues, when camera caught focus it was clean looking. Who knows..



posted on Sep, 2 2011 @ 08:19 PM
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Although I have never witnessed a tsunami, I would think it is pretty scary. I visualise it as rushing in taking everything with it as it forces its way inland (when it can go inland, but the fukushima plant is built on the sea side of a hill) and then receeding like a large wave does. I dont see it hanging around much because there is so much open ocean to return to.

Near to the sea I see damage, yes, However ,I would have expected to see a lot more mess and rubbish strewn about the place that there is evidence of in the images. Think about a flood and clearing up after that, mud, sand rubbish gets everywhere. So, I just dont understand why in some areas there is destruction (some of it unexplained, like the ladder being broken near the top of the building in the previous image) and some of it looks legitimate tsunami damage.

In other areas of Japan, the force of the water moved/floated heavy empty steel containers and pushed them inland across flat areas, it washed away concrete structures and bridges and made a heck of a mess. Here though, we see a surprisingly small amount of damage where the area is enclosed and where any force would be totally concentrated in the plant vicinity due to it being built 'into' the hillside.

Why doesn't the 20-30 foot tidal wave pick up everything in its path, hit the cliff at the back of the plant and then recede dropping everything everywhere?

On the Digital Globe images from middle of March for example, apart from near the sea, I see no debris and I see clear roads and pathways. Inside the plant I dont see rubbish clinging to fences and ladders and railings and steps. The Japanese would not have had time to clear away rubbish from these places bearing in mind, the other more serious problems theye were facing. The point is that when the water rushes in, it picks up everything and as it leaves, it leaves the rubbish it has collected everywhere. Water will take the path of least resistance when returning to the sea so we should see it all strewn about.

I just dont understand it.



posted on Sep, 2 2011 @ 09:34 PM
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www.youtube.com.../u/7/CdVANE88t9c
Just before sun rise at fuk. To me, it looks like #3 or 4 are releasing or exhaling but you be the judge. It's tricky the way the fog can roll in. The second one is sunrise, and a screen cap and zoom of the lights/flashing.
www.youtube.com...




posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 12:12 AM
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Fukushima Unit 3: Steam-Explosion Theory



The signature event of the Fukushima nuclear meltdowns was the large mushroom-cloud explosion of Unit 3 on March 14th. In contrast, the explosion of Unit 1 lacked any notable vertical projection. Yet Tokyo Electric Power Company assumes each was a hydrogen explosion in the upper-deck above the reactor. However, because dramatically different effects suggest different causes, let us consider an evidence-based model wherein the Unit-3 explosion was a steam explosion that vaporized tons of injected seawater into a mushroom cloud and that triggered secondary hydrogen explosions.

The risk of a steam explosion during a meltdown in the containment vessel housing a reactor has been a matter of considerable concern and research, as noted in Moriyama et al.:

The steam explosion caused by the contact of molten core and coolant [water] is recognized as one of the potential threats to the integrity of the containment vessel during a severe accident of light water reactors and one of the important sources of uncertainty in the evaluation of frequencies of large early fission product releases. [1]

Because seawater was injected into Unit-3 reactor in an effort to cool it during its meltdown, the necessary ingredients for a steam explosion were in the containment before the explosion. So given that a steam explosion is a recognized risk under such circumstances, the possibility of a steam explosion requires investigation, which we shall embark upon forthwith.

More interesting Theories:

Final goodbyes: Residents make short visit to hometown claimed by nuclear disaster



Residents of the town of Okuma, deep within the Fukushima nuclear crisis exclusion zone, on Sept. 1 made their first visits to their homes since the onset of the nuclear disaster on March 11, with many saying they didn't think they would ever return again. The town, about three kilometers south of the nuclear plant, has the highest radiation levels of any community in Fukushima Prefecture, according to a government study released on Aug. 19 that pegged the annual dose in one part of Okuma at 508.1 millisieverts.

Faced with this grim fact, Okuma's townspeople spent the scant hours of their trip in sadness and distress. Some 239 people from 149 of the town's households gathered for the journey at a public gymnasium in Hirono, Fukushima Prefecture. They set out for the exclusion zone on 13 microbuses just before noon, everyone in white protective suits, masks and plastic caps, their feet wrapped in blue plastic bags.

The bus for accompanying journalists joined the convoy and the whole procession headed north along National Route 6. Twenty kilometers from the nuclear plant we passed through a checkpoint at the edge of the exclusion zone, and entered an eerie parallel world of fully stocked convenience stores and ramen noodle restaurants with condiments and chopsticks sitting ready on the counters, but no people, whispering the terror of a nuclear disaster.

Sad stories:

Quake risk to reactors greater than thought



The risk that an earthquake would cause a severe accident at a U.S. nuclear plant is greater than previously thought, 24 times as high in one case, according to an AP analysis of preliminary government data. The nation's nuclear regulator believes a quarter of America's reactors may need modifications to make them safer. The threat came into sharp focus last week, when shaking from the largest earthquake to hit Virginia in 117 years appeared to exceed what the North Anna nuclear power plant northwest of Richmond was built to sustain. The two North Anna reactors are among 27 in the eastern and central U.S. that a preliminary Nuclear Regulatory Commission review has said may need upgrades. That's because those plants are more likely to get hit with an earthquake larger than the one their design was based on. Just how many nuclear power plants are more vulnerable won't be determined until all operators recalculate their own seismic risk based on new assessments by geologists, something the agency plans to request later this year. The NRC on Thursday issued a draft of that request for public comment. The review, launched well before the East Coast quake and the Japan nuclear disaster in March, marks the first complete update to seismic risk in years for the nation's 104 existing reactors, despite research showing greater hazards. The NRC and the industry say reactors are safe as they are, for now. The average risk to U.S. reactors of core damage from a quake remains low, at one accident every 500 years, according to the AP analysis of NRC data. The overall risk at a typical reactor among the 27 remains very slight. If the NRC's numbers prove correct, that would mean no more than one core accident from an earthquake in about 30,000 years at the typical reactor among the 27 with increased risk. But emails obtained in a more than 11,000-page records request by The Associated Press show that NRC experts were worried privately this year that plants needed stronger safeguards to account for the higher risk assessments.



posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 01:39 AM
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Originally posted by jadedANDcynical
reply to post by Silverlok
 


Holy schmokes! I know a tinsy bit about floating grounds; my dad was a plant supervisor for a large 4 unit power plant and worked in the utility for over 40 years, even though he's been retired for a good number of years now he still knows about electricity and it's use, transmission, generation, etc.

I do remember him emphasizing how dangerous floating grounds were, something about instability in flow direction and being more susceptible to radio interference. It's been a *long* time since I've heard him talking about that. I need to ask him again.

Oh, and as far as earthquakes go, what do they know and when do they know it?



I can guarantee that their is a Hawaiian high-school teacher that agrees with the EQ prediction thing, and, on a different note : floating grounds are hand in hand with (fluid based) transient criticalities ..if only some collective group of people working for free on the internet could have foreseen it ...( sigh)


Originally posted by Wertwog
reply to post by Silverlok
 

I've had haggis... not as bad as you think! Kinda like sausage with oats.

Okies, putting things together that perhaps don't play nicely with each other:

1. Contributing to the weakening of the 'sandstone/mudstone' underneath the reactors. Silver did you read the posts around the Finn's theory... around p1030/31-34. He's either got some marbles loose or some think he's on to something. He suggests neutron weakening of the sandstone impacts the methane clutter layer could be cause of #4 explosion - speculated.
2. Metal corrosion accelerated, add to that Cl-38 . Can't be good. Analysis .. transient criticality...
3. Heavy atmospheric ionization, charged particles, loads of moisture, floating ground = hmmmm. I don't know but if I had to work there I'd be wearing rubber booties under my radiation suit!


Interesting but probably cu-de-sac reasoning from the finn( but no I am not there yet so ask me again later ;-) : methane is not an especially powerful gas, especially in open space. It is more likely that #4 has been SO quiet (In terms of Tep-crap-i-co...incorporated, information releases about, what, exactly, happened ) because a dry reaction between common 'waste pool' ( or spent fuel if one is a moron ) and container "by-products" is explosive and dangerous and classified tech, and since ariva has been such a player, almost certainly tied to the ( unregistered use ) of mox, plutonium heavy fuels. a guess on my part but almost certainly close : dry pools , poolium and over flow and hydraulic tanks are most likely the suspects , though I did not figure whom the hell Kayser sose was until the shoe scuffing end part so take that into account


Originally posted by zworld

Originally posted by Silverlok
In fact they are almost certainly effecting (disrupting) the Tesla-Schumann resonance cavity in the local area

one example of it is the cranes on Seattle's waterfront absorbing radio frequencies and discharging them as electrical arcs.



Thank you SL. That makes sense as to the recent weird arcing, and maybe even lends new ways of looking at the light shows weve seen from time to time in the area of R3 and R4 and the CSFP on the webcam. I think I remember the Tesla-Schumann resonance from Tesla's work on his EQ machine. If memory serves it applies to anything, yes, everything has it's own frequency, not just the earth. Im going to look into this more as it applies to Fuku.

Where's Tessy when we really need him.



If EQ means earth quake , then NO, it was postulated ( Tesla postulated the existence of the ionosphere and then calculated it's resonance based on lightning strikes ( balances the field oscillation between the cosmic/solar radiation hitting/charging the ionosphere and the earth ground) with such precision that he could track storm fronts ( from his Colorado Springs digs) and was within spitting distance of the actual resonance number so when it was actually able to be measured ( due to tech advancement that made it possible; so re-discovered ) by Schumann about 60 years later ( hence the name ) he was proven correct , while he was perfecting his resonant energy transference (wireless) tech most of which is still "lost", hidden or 'classified' to this day

I don't think Tesla ever understood human nature AND politics ( as a set ), but he did understand passion and sex unlike Nietzsche ( whom I think thought it was selfish to satisfy himself with another person, a high moral calling but one that may have robbed his genius/madness of a very human insight that such genius seems to lack...
edit on 3-9-2011 by Silverlok because: hahahahahahahaah, now I am over the number of words limit, so : ... like most geniuses often they are the dumbest smart guys in the room, perhaps it's a condition of myopia

edit on 3-9-2011 by Silverlok because: (no reason given)




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