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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 1043.htm
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posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 04:42 AM
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Incredible posts folks!! Truly a stupendous group of people on this thread!!

A shame that we have to focus our intelligence, time and effort on deciphering all the lies and corruption from Big Business and the Gov't.

Bet the "Gestapo" doesn't like this thread much at all. Hope ATS is making safe, solid backups!! Got a little nervous the other day when it was down. Other ATS threads were up...but not this one.

And to quote Thomas Jefferson again...
"When governments fear the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny."

- Purple Chive




posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 04:48 AM
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What is wrong with the Tepco Cam today,
it looks disgusting!

@ 18.45pm Godzillas Nice has shown up!

I think we will see a steamy Night

edit on 30-8-2011 by Human0815 because: info



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 05:21 AM
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3 Fukushima nuke plant workers blasted with beta radiation



Cleaning those filters...Arnie said that was going to be a major problem because they would be extremely "hot" and no robot to do the job.


According to the TEPCO announcement of Aug. 29, the three men were replacing the filters on the decontamination system between 10 and 11:30 a.m. on Aug. 28, pulling out submerged components to replace the filters. The maximum beta radiation exposure to workers during this task is capped at 15 millisieverts, but two of the men absorbed doses of 23.4 and 17.1 millisieverts, respectively.



Beta rays are a type of radiation that can penetrate through the skin and into the body, and total exposure is legally limited to 1,000 millisieverts. The three men involved noticed they had gone over the 15-millisievert limit for their task on Aug. 28, but did not report it to their supervisor until the following day as they thought the exposure level was within legal limits.


mdn.mainichi.jp...

- Purple chive



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 05:27 AM
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Originally posted by Human0815
What is wrong with the Tepco Cam today,
it looks disgusting!

@ 18.45pm Godzillas Nice has shown up!

I think we will see a steamy Night

edit on 30-8-2011 by Human0815 because: info


A BIG BUG!! Wonder if radiation makes them grow larger!



- Purple Chive



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 07:56 AM
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Convoluted way TEPCO explains rate hike...



Fuel Cost Adjustment in Electricity Fees for October 2011

www.tepco.co.jp...

And with the Finance guy now the Prime Minister...some pretty slick turds in power...

- Purple Chive



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 09:20 AM
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reply to post by zworld
 


Top left building, above your "welfare building" lable is the dry cask storage facility.



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 09:35 AM
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Some more TEPCO pics on cryptome



cryptome.org...

- Purple Chive



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 10:52 AM
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Originally posted by qmantoo
There are reports of underground tunnels extending many kilometres in other areas of the world, so why not here in Fukushima. Why couldn't it connect Daini to Daiichi?


The pic of black smoke isnt in the Daini plant. Not sure where it is. Nearby?

A massive tunnel system is a possibility simply because Japan doesnt have much above ground land to work with. The thought of a connection between Daiichi and Daini is interesting though.

We'll probably never know for sure.



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 10:59 AM
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Originally posted by jadedANDcynical

Top left building, above your "welfare building" lable is the dry cask storage facility.

Thanks J&C. Will add.



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 11:04 AM
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reply to post by Human0815[/url]

On the new version of the map I added your info, though mostly what I am seeing on the schematics are things labeled ducts, but who knows what that represents. Could be a four lane freeway if enough stuff needs ducting. But definately, yes, there is a tunnel system under Fuku irrespective if there is also an underground complex.

It adds a whole other scenario, and answers some of the questions that the inclusion of the UC adds, especially concerning crosstalk between the basements of the reactor buildings. You wouldn't need a UC for this to occur.

Good eye Human.



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 11:05 AM
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Survey Finds Radiation Over Wide Area in Japan



The first comprehensive survey of soil contamination from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant showed that 33 locations spread over a wide area have been contaminated with long-lasting radioactive cesium, the government said Tuesday. The survey of 2,200 locations within a 100-kilometer (62-mile) radius of the crippled plant found that those 33 locations had cesium-137 in excess of 1.48 million becquerels per square meter, the level set by the Soviet Union for forced resettlement after the 1986 Chernobyl disaster.

Another 132 locations had a combined amount of cesium 137/134 over 555,000 becquerels per square meter, the level at which the Soviet authorities called for voluntary evacuation and imposed a ban on farming. Authorities said that all of the highest levels are within the current evacuation zone, which is generally 20 kilometers (12 miles) around the plant plus some specific towns to the northwest that have already been found to have high levels of contamination.

Cesium-137 has a half life of 30 years, meaning that its radioactive emissions will decline only by half after 30 years and affect the environment over several generations. Cesium-134 is considered somewhat less of a long-term problem because it has a half-life of two years. More than 400 researchers from across the country took part in the survey, conducted between June and July, collecting samples from every two square kilometers (1.2 miles) of land within the 100-kilometer radius of the crippled plant. Until then, only estimates were available about the extent of soil contamination through aerial surveys and airborne dust samplings. "The results of the soil analysis have confirmed our estimates about contamination," an official of the education ministry said at a press briefing.

More

Kazakhstan’s nuclear legacy offers lessons for Fukushima



The Semipalatinsk region suffered under four decades of Soviet nuclear testing. Now, the country wants to become an international research hub for the effects of radiation on future generations. Matilda Lee reports from Kazakhstan Ground zero is an hour and a half drive away from the Kazakh National Nuclear Centre (NNC) along a dusty road in the seemingly endless steppe.

The Ecologist is in the Semipalatinsk (renamed Semey in 1991) region of eastern Kazakhstan to observe one of the world's nuclear hotspots: the epicenter of the Soviet Union's previous - and highly controversial - nuclear testing programme. The natural beauty of the reeds and rushes blowing in the breeze and the sun reflecting off the water belies the truth of this spot: the ‘lake' is actually a crater created from the explosions and the ground beneath is highly radioactive, and indeed, dangerous.

Our military escort carries a Geiger counter, first measuring 0.09 micro Sieverts per hour along the drive, then shooting up to 3.6 micro Sieverts per hour. My mind vacillates between extreme fear and confidence in what I have been told: being at the epicentre for 10 minutes will give you a dose of radiation the same as that of taking a transatlantic flight. Facemasks and feet covers offer protection from inhaling or gathering the radioactive dust. We hastily make our way back. The experience is not one to be repeated, but will always be remembered.

Highly Informative:

Fukushima residents decry Kan's comment



Residents of Fukushima Prefecture expressed their anger over outgoing Prime Minister Naoto Kan's comment that some areas close to the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant will remain uninhabitable for a long time. During a meeting with Fukushima Gov. Yuhei Sato on Saturday, Kan said, "There is a possibility that residents of some areas will not be able to [return and] live there for a long time." Kan's comment offended residents of Futabamachi and Okumamachi in Fukushima Prefecture, where the power plant is located.

"The government hasn't even tried to decontaminate the areas. We're appalled," a local resident said. "The areas with high radiation levels are scattered. I want to ask him what grounds he has for saying 'areas that will remain uninhabitable,'" Tomoe Unuma, 36, said. Unuma, who evacuated to a shelter in Kazo, Saitama Prefecture, made a temporary visit to her house in Futabamachi on Friday for the first time since the outbreak of nuclear crisis. Mitsuko Nishiuchi, 49, who is also taking refuge in Kazo and made a temporary visit to her house in Futabamachi, said: "I understood what Kan meant is it will be difficult to live there. Now I'm more reconciled to the idea that I'll have to live here [in Kazo]."


Tokyo Elec to start Fukushima compensation in Oct


Tokyo Electric Power unveiled the first details on Tuesday of how it would compensate Fukushima residents for lodging and other costs stemming from their evacuation of areas close to its crippled nuclear plant. The payments, due to reach victims in October, nearly seven months after the start of the nuclear crisis, mark just the first round in a series of state-supported outlays that some analysts estimate could climb as high as $130 billion. About 80,000 people were evacuated from a 20 kilometre radius around Tokyo Electric's Fukushima Daiichi plant, which has been leaking radiation since a March 11 earthquake and tsunami triggered a meltdown of reactor cores. Tokyo Electric and the government have come under fire for their slow response to the crisis. Many of the evacuees are still living in shelters or temporary homes, and the effort to decontaminate the area has just begun. "We again apologise deeply for our Fukushima accident, which has caused trouble and concerns among people around nuclear plants, among the people of Fukushima and Japan as a whole," Tokyo Electric Managing Director Naomi Hirose told a briefing. Underscoring the unprecedented scale of the task ahead, Tokyo Electric said it would mobilise about 6,500 employees and contract workers to start accepting compensation claims at field offices and call centres from Sept. 12. The initial round of compensation claims will cover lost income, psychological suffering and costs for transportation and lodging, among other things, between March 11 and Aug. 31.
whole story



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 11:27 AM
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reply to post by Purplechive
 


Speaking of the cam, I have been studying the cam extensively recently. I think there are two that they switch between on occasion. I say this because of the infrared shots, and because there are times when the cam is in perfect focus and doesnt go through 4 stages of way out of focus to just slightly out of focus, like the main cheapie one they use does. could this be why the time stamp is blurred out, cause it looks different depending on the cam.

Next time it goes to the one in focus, (it doesn't very often, only twice Ive seen) Ill grab a screen and examine it to the other.

As an aside, there is one other forum, Timebomb2000 or TB2K, that has tried to stay on top of Fuku, but is running out of steam, and there are a couple on there who would do good over here. But Ive never joined, and now you have to send a request to the mods to be able to join (screening) and I dont like going through hoops. If anyone belongs to this forum, could you mention that the ATS Fukushima Forensics team would love their input.



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 12:05 PM
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More info on the wacko "TEPCO-MAN" in the Webcam




Answers from Tepco:
(1) He is not an outsider. He is a Tepoco’s worker,and he’s already identified.
(2) This Area is restricted zone. Outsider cannot enter there.
(3) His action is not “check” nor “inspect”. Not a routine work.
(4) Tepco did not understand what he means.
(5) Tepco warned him for his action which may cause misunderstanding or anxiety.


Read more...
fukushima-diary.com...

- Purple Chive



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 12:38 PM
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This can't be good. Trying to understand what this implies. I'd like to see a map of the area to understand the watershed involved, which would be the receiving basin for any radiation this poor guy was exposed to.

The problem Im having with this scenario is that this area is outside the areas that were hit with heavy doses of rads according to the SPEEDI data, and the NILU (Norways early mapping) projections, which showed the areas being hit as northwest and to a lesser extent north of Fukushima, and a wrap around pattern that occurred a couple of times where the plume headed out to sea and south and then looped back into the Tokyo area.




Gunma prefecture, north of Tokyo, reported Monday that a fish containing more than the legally allowed amount of cesium was caught in a river in the prefecture, the first such case outside Fukushima prefecture, where the plant is located.


ON EDIT: Dont have a WSJ account. Does the story say which river the fish came from.

Just found this



Ten days after an earthquake and tsunami crippled a nuclear plant in Japan, officials are detecting abnormal levels of radiation in what may seem like a scattershot assortment of foods: milk from Fukushima Prefecture, where the reactors sit; spinach from Ibaraki Prefecture to the south; canola from Gunma Prefecture to the west; and chrysanthemum greens from Chiba to the south. Shipments of the milk and spinach have been banned.


This is from www.nytimes.com...

So this area has experienced contamination from early on. Interesting. I suspect much more than they admitted to. All early projections were based on Tepcos data and weather conditions.

Gunma prefecture is southwest of Daiichi. Depending on which river system, it could be closer to Tokyo than Fukushima. Its definately in the area that isnt projected to have been hit hard.




edit on 30-8-2011 by zworld because: (no reason given)

edit on 30-8-2011 by zworld because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 12:56 PM
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www.youtube.com...
Our man, who is trying to make a point [Yuk Yuk] is on the news in Japan. Could someone translate? I'd like to hear their take on this man. This URL has an = sign and yet didn't show up in the preview when I copied back to it, so I just pasted the link.



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 01:02 PM
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With the news of 23,000 times more Pu239 released than initially stated (as we expected), I believe it's time for a laugh to even it out!





[size=-3]Disclaimer: the above two images are not affiliated with TEPCO, official logo utillised as public domain.
Both images' included text ©2011 GhostR1der of abovetopsecret.com all rights reserved, free for non-commercial use.
edit on 30/8/11 by GhostR1der because: text size screwed up



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 01:07 PM
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reply to post by zworld
 


But that Region has a lot of Hills and Mountains (really Hilly)
imo it is logical that the Rivers collect a lot of Radiation,
spec. on that Time in March,
always Foggy!



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 02:00 PM
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Originally posted by Human0815
reply to post by zworld
 


But that Region has a lot of Hills and Mountains (really Hilly)
imo it is logical that the Rivers collect a lot of Radiation,
spec. on that Time in March,
always Foggy!


I agree. Anything in the mountains of Japan I assume. But the most crucial factor, other than Tepco being honest about how much was released, is where the wind was blowing. And Gunma is not normally downwind of Fukushima too often from what Ive been seeing. But Japan has incredibly diverse, and almost chaotic wind patterns full of eddys and flows, so just because the wind was blowing a certain direction at the top of the hour, its anybodies guess where it was blowing during the hour or where it swirled around to.



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 02:16 PM
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Originally posted by Purplechive


And to quote Thomas Jefferson again...
"When governments fear the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny."

- Purple Chive


This is going to be offtopic, sort of, though not really when one considers where this train is going. But TJ and Sam Adams are my heroes, and their quotes have guided me many times. Those two were the real American Revolution. Sam got it started by making people aware, and TJ kept it going after the war was won.

And they both saw what might happen in the future without curbing the powers that they knew cliques of elites would try and create. They were talking to us in the future like Ike was when he gave his good-bye and watch out speech. Sadly, all of the warnings of the elders through the years have fallen on deaf ears far too often, and now we are left with the exact condition they warned us about.

But the awakening has begun, and never again will we blindly follow like cows heading to slaughter. Let the games begin.



posted on Aug, 30 2011 @ 02:34 PM
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Originally posted by Aircooled
www.youtube.com...
Our man, who is trying to make a point [Yuk Yuk] is on the news in Japan. Could someone translate? I'd like to hear their take on this man. This URL has an = sign and yet didn't show up in the preview when I copied back to it, so I just pasted the link.




For AC.

- Purple Chive




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