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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 10:47 PM
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26 groups want safety examined after Fukushima

The New England Coalition has no plans to stand still while the calendar ticks down to Sept. 12 when the Entergy v. Vermont case — litigation that could decide the fate of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power station’s renewal license and three Vermont statutes — resumes in U.S. District Court in Brattleboro.

The anti-nuclear group has filed complaints with 25 other advocacy organizations — including Beyond Nuclear, Riverkeeper, Inc., and Citizens Environment Alliance of Southwestern Ontario — against the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

The groups filed 19 legal challenges against the NRC last week, calling for the delay or cancellation of the relicensing of all nuclear reactors.




posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 11:03 PM
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One good piece of news... that SOB Naoto Kan, the Japanese PM, will be out of office on August 30.

So maybe, just maybe, the next Japanese PM will stop being a TEPCO shill and do something good... like tell the truth... but I'm not holding my breath.

Even more improbable... the next PM could indict the current PM for all the lies he's done, killing his own people.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 11:18 PM
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enenews.com...
I think Arnie mentioned this about the plutonium, off site being from the reactors, and not the pools.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 12:40 AM
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Originally posted by Aircooled
enenews.com...
I think Arnie mentioned this about the plutonium, off site being from the reactors, and not the pools.


Yes, NRC is saying it was the reactors that blew, Arnie still maintains it was the SFP, but says if he is wrong the situation is far more serious.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 01:19 AM
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Originally posted by Aircooled


Shot of the stack that comes out of the incineration building, which confuses me as Ive said before. This is the reason I thought that at least one of the stacks in the 4stack was liggit, the incineration building must be in the CWT building and why it uses one of the stacks. This means that there are 5 stacks in the south end complex, which I think is a greater total than any other Japanese nuclear plant in and of itself except for the biggest one which has 7. Curiouser and curiouser.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 01:50 AM
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Originally posted by Wertwog

What this means is that the remaining half is still 100% radioactive. It's really common for folks to think that the radioactive sample is "half as radioactive", but that is wrong.


Thanks WW. And to further clarify, it only takes one molecule of the stuff to begin the cancer process. So anything left behind is just as lethal until the last bit is gone.

This also reminds me of how bs their system of risk analysis is. Since a single molecule of many cancer causing substances is all it takes to start that train rolling, industry had to come up with a way to make it sound like something wasn't dangerous so it could be approved for use. They came up with the percentage of risk. It goes like this. 'if I spread this much of this toxic stuff around, current figures (manipulated in advance) show that only 1 in 10,000 will die from cancer'. And somehow this appeased governments of the world. There are three problems with this when considering nuclear power.

a) It doesn't take into account the fact that radiation will spread with the wind around the globe, so the number of deaths would be in the thousands just using the manipulated numbers regulatory agencies use. And then you have to multiply this by the number of generations that will be exposed.

b) It doesn't take into account current thought on how cancer's initiate. Our immune system's are like buckets. Through the years we pile in toxic chemicals, stress, drugs, pain and all the other things weaken us. And our immune system holds them back and keeps them from starting cancers. Then one day, when the bucket is full, bamb, that drop that it couldn't contain over flows the edge and we're in trouble. And right now our buckets are about as full as they've ever been for many of us.

c) I always thought killing even one person is wrong. How can a company make a product and boldly claim it will only kill 1 in 10,000, or 1 in 10 million. Doesn't that still make them murderers.

They ignore this stuff because they want to make money. And we make them pillars of society.


edit on 23-8-2011 by zworld because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 02:00 AM
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Originally posted by Aircooled



The guy who took these states that he was surprised by both the condition of this building, and the fact that it was stripped of everything inside. They didn't strip the other buildings on this block cause it's in the hot zone next to R1. What was so important that they had to remove everything.

He was also surprised by all the pipes. So am I. The black pipes are used for nitrogen. Where are all these pipes going. And why are they divided into two groups, the blue plastic and the white plastic.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 02:09 AM
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Methane hydrates is one of my fields of expertise, unlike nuclear which caught me offguard, but Im too tired to continue. Ill post some mind boggling stuff tomorrow. However, last summer under a name I couldn't remember so I used zworld this time, in a thread on the oil spill I posted a link to a methane hydrate report that I recently completed for an NGO. If anyone knows which thread or saw the report its a dozy.

Adios amigos. Tons to do with so little time. Keep up the good work all.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 03:50 AM
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Originally posted by zworld

Originally posted by Wertwog

What this means is that the remaining half is still 100% radioactive. It's really common for folks to think that the radioactive sample is "half as radioactive", but that is wrong.


Thanks WW. And to further clarify, it only takes one atom of the stuff to begin the cancer process. So anything left behind is just as lethal until the last bit is gone.

This also reminds me of how bs their system of risk analysis is. Since a single molecule of many cancer causing substances is all it takes to start that train rolling, industry had to come up with a way to make it sound like something wasn't dangerous so it could be approved for use. They came up with the percentage of risk. It goes like this. 'if I spread this much of this toxic stuff around, current figures (manipulated in advance) show that only 1 in 10,000 will die from cancer'. And somehow this appeased governments of the world. There are three problems with this when considering nuclear power.

a) It doesn't take into account the fact that radiation will spread with the wind around the globe, so the number of deaths would be in the thousands just using the manipulated numbers regulatory agencies use. And then you have to multiply this by the number of generations that will be exposed.

b) It doesn't take into account current thought on how cancer's initiate. Our immune system's are like buckets. Through the years we pile in toxic chemicals, stress, drugs, pain and all the other things weaken us. And our immune system holds them back and keeps them from starting cancers. Then one day, when the bucket is full, bamb, that drop that it couldn't contain over flows the edge and we're in trouble. And right now our buckets are about as full as they've ever been for many of us.

c) I always thought killing even one person is wrong. How can a company make a product and boldly claim it will only kill 1 in 10,000, or 1 in 10 million. Doesn't that still make them murderers.

They ignore this stuff because they want to make money. And we make them pillars of society.


You're all kinds of fired up! Good for you! Agreed wholeheartedly! The general public has been fed such a load of crap for the last 50 years, just like a person who's lost their sense of smell, willingly eats the rotten left-overs meant for the dog simply because he can't tell it's putrid.

Think about this also. It's largely the engineers and physicists who have told us what is safe dosages. Since when are physicists experts on medicine? We've let physicists set the radiation safety levels! It's not physicians and epidemiologists who have the ear of the NRC/IAEA and all the other regulatory agencies. How absolutely insane is that? Engineers and physicists, employed by the industry and reliant on it's continuation for their livelihood (no conflict of interest there), frequently and boldly proclaim what the 'safe' levels of radiation, and we fall for it, worse we let our regulators fall for it.

Not only that, these nuke brainiacs consistently forget to take fully into account in their ridiculously flawed risk models INTERNAL radiation emitters, not just 'absorbed doses' from external exposures. The LNR model, and the ICRP model (developed in the 50's before Chernobyl), currently being used everywhere, even the author seems to say his model shouldn't be used for nuclear accidents (!!!!!!), and that absorbed doses have x2 orders of magnitude are a huge level of uncertainty. Just listen to Valentin and how callously he calculates human lives lost just as you were describing. Busby isn't without his own controversy and is rather hated by several establishment scientists who accuse him of pseudo-science.

A very interesting discussion between Jack Valentin (author of ICRP model) and Christopher Busby.




I particularly love this bit from Helen Calicott:
Dr. Helen Caldicott - Unsafe at any Dose


---
Nuclear accidents never cease. We’re decades if not generations away from seeing the full effects of the radioactive emissions from Chernobyl.

As we know from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, it takes years to get cancer. Leukemia takes only 5 to 10 years to emerge, but solid cancers take 15 to 60. Furthermore, most radiation-induced mutations are recessive; it can take many generations for two recessive genes to combine to form a child with a particular disease, like my specialty, cystic fibrosis. We can’t possibly imagine how many cancers and other diseases will be caused in the far future by the radioactive isotopes emitted by Chernobyl and Fukushima.

Doctors understand these dangers. We work hard to try to save the life of a child dying of leukemia. We work hard to try to save the life of a woman dying of metastatic breast cancer. And yet the medical dictum says that for incurable diseases, the only recourse is prevention. There’s no group better prepared than doctors to stand up to the physicists of the nuclear industry.

Still, physicists talk convincingly about “permissible doses” of radiation. They consistently ignore internal emitters — radioactive elements from nuclear power plants or weapons tests that are ingested or inhaled into the body, giving very high doses to small volumes of cells. They focus instead on generally less harmful external radiation from sources outside the body, whether from isotopes emitted from nuclear power plants, medical X-rays, cosmic radiation or background radiation that is naturally present in our environment.

However, doctors know that there is no such thing as a safe dose of radiation, and that radiation is cumulative. The mutations caused in cells by this radiation are generally deleterious. We all carry several hundred genes for disease: cystic fibrosis, diabetes, phenylketonuria, muscular dystrophy. There are now more than 2,600 genetic diseases on record, any one of which may be caused by a radiation-induced mutation, and many of which we’re bound to see more of, because we are artificially increasing background levels of radiation.

For many years now, physicists employed by the nuclear industry have been outperforming doctors, at least in politics and the news media. Since the Manhattan Project in the 1940s, physicists have had easy access to Congress. They had harnessed the energy inside the center of the sun, and later physicists, whether lobbying for nuclear weapons or nuclear energy, had the same power. They walk into Congress and Congress virtually prostrates itself. Their technological advancements are there for all to see; the harm will become apparent only decades later.

Doctors, by contrast, have fewer dates with Congress, and much less access on nuclear issues. We don’t typically go around discussing the latent period of carcinogenesis and the amazing advances made in understanding radiobiology. But as a result, we do an inadequate job of explaining the long-term dangers of radiation to policymakers and the public.

When patients come to us with cancer, we deem it rude to inquire if they lived downwind of Three Mile Island in the 1980s or might have eaten Hershey’s chocolate made with milk from cows that grazed in irradiated pastures nearby. We tend to treat the disaster after the fact, instead of fighting to stop it from happening in the first place. Doctors need to confront the nuclear industry.

Nuclear power is neither clean, nor sustainable, nor an alternative to fossil fuels — in fact, it adds substantially to global warming. Solar, wind and geothermal energy, along with conservation, can meet our energy needs.

At the beginning, we had no sense that radiation induced cancer. Marie Curie and her daughter didn’t know that the radioactive materials they handled would kill them. But it didn’t take long for the early nuclear physicists in the Manhattan Project to recognize the toxicity of radioactive elements. I knew many of them quite well. They had hoped that peaceful nuclear energy would absolve their guilt over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but it has only extended it.

Physicists had the knowledge to begin the nuclear age. Physicians have the knowledge, credibility and legitimacy to end it.


See also, Low-level radiation campaignPhysicians for Social Responsibility, Main websiteNo nuke website who are dead-set against nuclear power.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 04:01 AM
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That reminds me, does anybody remember what happened to these guys?




posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 04:54 AM
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ex-skf.blogspot.com...

So it looks like there new water treatment system may be useless now unless the can flush out what ever is causing this extreme amount of radiation.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 05:55 AM
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Former U.S. envoy critical of Japan's nuclear crisis response



Speaking to reporters in Tokyo, Maher said U.S. officials worried about the lack of leadership shown by Prime Minister Naoto Kan's government after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami led to partial reactor meltdowns at the coastal plant. At one point, Maher said, the Obama administration considered a worst-case scenario of evacuating tens of thousands of U.S. citizens from the Tokyo metropolitan area.

"There was nobody in charge," Maher said Thursday at a speech at the Foreign Correspondents Club of Japan. "Nobody in the Japanese political system was willing to say, 'I'm going to take responsibility and make decisions.' " The former envoy, who coordinated U.S. assistance to Japan during the crisis, said progress was made only after Tokyo and Washington launched a joint task force. Before that, Maher said, "nothing was taking place at Fukushima Daiichi in terms of the government solving the problem."

Read the whole Story

Freezing winter looms for Tokyo post-Fukushima


With September barely a week away and Tokyo’s wicked-hot summer having sparked to life in only a couple of brief spells, the capital’s residents can now breathe easy, safe in the knowledge that post-Fukushima power outages are but a fading fear. Or are they? Not according to the “Nikkei Shimbun” newspaper, which says the next looming threat is a freezing winter compounded by electricity shortages and a lack of backup from power plants outside the Kanto region. Read more: Freezing winter looms for Tokyo post-Fukushima | CNNGo.com www.cnngo.com...


Science teachers stumped over instruction on radiation as nuclear crisis continues


The subject of radiation is set to make an appearance in junior high school science textbooks in the coming school year for the first time in 30 years, which has teachers concerned about their ability to teach students about the topic. As the nuclear crisis at the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant drags on, members of the public remain divided on their views toward the handling of radioactive contamination as well as the question of what to do about Japan's relationship with nuclear power. Many science teachers have never had to teach students about radiation before, prompting concerns over whether they will be able to accurately answer students' questions.

Training sessions for teachers have been held in response to the planned reintroduction of radiation in textbooks. One such session was held by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government on Aug. 16, with some 50 people in attendance. In addition to lectures by radiation experts, attendees conducted experiments, including one that involved the visualization of radiation and another in which the participants measured radiation levels in salt.

"My students may ask questions about radiation, but so much remains unknown about it, even among experts," said a teacher at a public junior high school in Chofu, Tokyo, who attended the workshop. "Entering such territory will put teachers in difficult positions."

Read the whole Article

2.5 trillion yen in nuclear money doled out to local governments since 1966



Local governments have received at least 2.5 trillion yen in "nuclear money" in the form of subsidies, fixed property taxes and other payments since the start of nuclear power generation in Japan in 1966, a tally by the Mainichi shows. But the total is certain to be much higher because many local governments are not releasing data on nuclear power-related fixed property taxes and donations. The Mainichi compiled the tally based on data from the Agency for Natural Resources and Energy, which operates under the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, and interviews with local governments.

Of the 2.5 trillion yen, about 915 billion yen came from subsidies based on the nation's three power source-related laws, enacted in 1974, while 892 billion yen came from fixed property taxes that cities, towns and villages have slapped on operators of nuclear power plants. Hokkaido and 12 other prefectures have also collected roughly 675 billion yen in nuclear fuel tax from electric companies that have built nuclear power stations in those prefectures. In addition, these utilities have donated some 53 billion yen to local governments concerned, the Mainichi found.
Source



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 07:08 AM
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Originally posted by zworld

Originally posted by Aircooled



The guy who took these states that he was surprised by both the condition of this building, and the fact that it was stripped of everything inside. They didn't strip the other buildings on this block cause it's in the hot zone next to R1. What was so important that they had to remove everything.

He was also surprised by all the pipes. So am I. The black pipes are used for nitrogen. Where are all these pipes going. And why are they divided into two groups, the blue plastic and the white plastic.


Those types of corrugated HDPE pipes are usually not used for pressurized gases, I've seen them used as drains and fiber conduit, but that's about it. Not sure what they are rated to hold, pressure wise.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 11:00 AM
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Welcome back Z! And great posts along with Ghost, AC et. all...

Arnie's latest video kinda summed it up that this nightmare ain't going away for a long time. Took me for a spin.

And now bus routes being detoured due the high microsieverts in Fuku.

www3.nhk.or.jp...

Surreal...

- Purple Chive



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 12:45 PM
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Following the money....

Uranium-oxide concentrate for immediate delivery sold for $50.50 a pound in the seven days ended yesterday, the same as the previous week, Ux said in an e-mailed report today. That’s based on the most-competitive offer tracked by the Roswell, Georgia-based company.


Then here comes the real scary part....

Kazatomprom, the Kazakhstan state nuclear company, said yesterday it plans a 100-fold increase in sales of uranium pellets to China within three years as the world’s biggest energy consumer almost triples the number of nuclear power plants it operates.
Source

TRIPLE!!!
I certainly hope they do not "copy" all the design flaws.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 03:10 PM
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reply to post by Wertwog
There are now more than 2,600 genetic diseases on record, any one of which may be caused by a radiation-induced mutation, and many of which we’re bound to see more of, because we are artificially increasing background levels of radiation.


Another important aspect to this whole nightmare of toxic exposure. It's not just this one thing, or that one thing, it's many illnesses we know of, and many we don't. Endocrine disruption showed us how little we know about illness and exposure to toxic substances. Radiation could be, on top of all we know, having wide ranging effects to the health and well being of humans that we aren't even aware of yet. And may never be aware of them cause industry and the rich have locked up the medical research field with money for cures (usually synthetic petrochemical pharmaceuticals they make more money from), and not research for prevention.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 03:14 PM
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reply to post by rbrtj
 


Ill see if I can still find it, but when researching Tepco's nukes, I came across an IAEA doc that listed all new plants in the pipeline, being planned, seeking approval or already approved and ready to begin construction, and the list was a fugging mile long. I just looked at and then clicked off the website without downloading cause I never wanted to see that page again.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 03:33 PM
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I have to take off for the day and wont have time to post the MH data, but I can say this. MH is ice under 164 times compression. It needs two distinct parameters to exist. These are temperature and pressure known as the stability zone. On either side of these parameters the MH comes out of it's frozen state and expands 164 times.

Much of the MH that was formed thousands and millions of years ago has now been buried deep enough so that the earth's inner warmth has heated the area to above the t/p stability zone, and these pockets are now just methane (or other nat gas, but mostly methane) under intense overpressures. These pockets are what cause many of the gas kicks when encountered in the drilling process.

Any MH that is now under land and not a part of permafrost has already been heated by the earth's inner temps and is in it's gaseous state. I call these pockets 'relic hydrates', but industry refuses to recognize their existence, and instead pretends that MH only exists where it could be formed today, and not a million years ago during an ice age when everything was much colder and the stablitiy zone was much wider.

So under Fuku there are most likely relic hydrates, but there wouldn't be MH.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by zworld
 

"most likely relic hydrates, but there wouldn't be MH"
but thats the same as saying,,,,"its not regular gas, its unleaded".
who wrote it, ?
tepco?



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 03:56 PM
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www.google.com...
A little closer to home...I felt the quake here in eastern Ontario. Just a little rumble here. It seems there is an issue with a nuke plant, as well.



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