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Oh no, Yellowstone May have been awakened by the 8.8

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posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:04 AM
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Originally posted by lordtyp0
reply to post by MonkeyWrench30
 


You realize I hope that a tsunami is a tidal wave.. Not a kinetic reaction in the Tectonic plates?
Yellowstone is far in on the tectonic shelf, though there is a lot of volcanic activity from the subduction over on the coast-the quake would have to be massively more powerful to really trigger a reaction. This activity in YS just looks like it's normal (relatively recent) burbling.

Hate to be pedantic, but a tsunami is not a tidal wave, it has nothing to do with tides but can be caused by earthquakes, landslide, volcanic eruptions, explosions and meteorites




posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:04 AM
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THOSE ARE LOCAL.


Forgive my ignorance, but what does THOSE ARE LOCAL mean? It's my understanding that readings will spike all over the world after a major quake due to seismic waves, as can be seen here:

aslwww.cr.usgs.gov...

Am I misunderstanding?



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:04 AM
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more seismo facts:
the long period component of a seismo, wherever in the world will show events from around the world.

for example, this seismo is very long period component from a seismo here in the UK, it shows activity from world seismic events.
www.earthquakes.bgs.ac.uk...


Seismology is a science.

'readings' like those eventually proposed as 'evidence' from OP on this thread aren't accurate, probably relate to world events and are misleading.
edit on 11-3-2011 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:04 AM
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reply to post by westcoast
 


agreed and that is why lots of people are reading whats going on



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:05 AM
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i just heard sky TV say that the moon is closest possible to the earth and this increases the risk of earthquakes. Ive read something about this on here before...



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:07 AM
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reply to post by westcoast
 


A needle twitching a quake does not make.
But I guess that doesn't fit the narrative.
Have a good one I will bugger off and leave the thread in peace.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:10 AM
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reply to post by redtic
 


Local simply means that the tremors/activity is originating from an area.

What the OP means by say the activity is local mean that the residual energy from the initial quake is not what is setting off the seismographs, but rather that the activity is now coming directly from the Yellowstone-area itself.

(Hope this helps anyone that was wondering)



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:11 AM
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For the lay people on here like me, let me relay what I am understanding from listening to the news channels since I woke up about 4:30 am EST.
When a quake of this magnatude occurs it's like ringing a bell on the earths crust. The bell does not just ring at the point where the clacker struck. It rings all over the bell. But like waves on a still pond when you toss in a rock, the waves carry away from the center of the disturbance and loose maganatude all along the way. According to what I heard this morning it is quite normal for other quakes to occur after and around the large quake. Activity increases are normal and expected. So even if there is ringing in the bell it does not mean it is tolling a death knell.

New update: Waves are now hitting the northwest coast of Kona, Hawaii....

Creator have mercy on your Creations.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:11 AM
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reply to post by lordtyp0
 


TA is great. I thank him for everything he does here. I don't want these threads dumbed down for the masses like others are implying. I do not personally need 4 page documentation on everything posted. I analyze the data, research the topic, and form my own opinion. I don't want instructions with the data on how to read and interpret it. So yeah...THANK YOU TA!



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:12 AM
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Originally posted by shadowland8
reply to post by wingsfan
 


Ah okay.

So, Yellowstone is a highly volatile place, volcanic, and an earthquake there could trigger a really bad eruption.


How bad would this eruption be, and like how would it affect the world?


Go to You Tube and search for Super Volcano. There's a good BBC docudrama there, for starters.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:14 AM
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I don't know if this was posted before, But this earthquake was predicted 3 days before.





posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:15 AM
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reply to post by FlyInTheOintment
 


I agree, I took my kids to see it and they liked the special effects. I only mentioned it to the poster to give an example of what Yellowstone might look like if it blows. From everything I've heard it would be cataclysmic to North America. Not something I want to see and I admit it does make me a little wary. I'm sure there are much better examples, though, you're right. I saw a History Channel show on it one time and they do a decent job of portraying things as they could be "if" it erupts.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:16 AM
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reply to post by theabsolutetruth
 


You are showing helicorders with very strong P waves that are going around the world.

We are observing the park on EHZ channels...it makes it possible to still see what is going on underneath.

We are not dumb. Like TA said....not all of what is showing are local quakes....but there are many that are quite distinct.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:16 AM
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reply to post by juggalo77
 


yellowstone is a super volcano and its eruption would make most of the USA an inhospitable place



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:23 AM
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Let me go about this a bit different. I will show you two different stations in the park (these are not the live GEE, but pull the same info)....they are both EHZ channels. They are both set at 1600 microvolts. Both TA and I have noticed these quakes seem to be coming from the SW corner of the park.

SO....here is the first station a bit NE of the middle of the park:

YML


Here is the other station in the SW corner of the park:

MCID


No....not all of those are local quakes, but there are DEFINATELY numerous ones there. They even have the ole' Yellowstone signature 'double tap' characteristic to them.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:24 AM
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Need to get Robin and Puterman up in here. TA is top notch as well....Listen to what he is saying.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:24 AM
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reply to post by Seitler
 


So, can you explain how the seismograph at that station distinguishes between a "local" event and the seismic waves from a large event thousands of miles away?



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:26 AM
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Whats the best case scenario? Things gradually simmer down and people forget this ever happened? So lets say things simmer down in YS over the next week. What happens when the Supermoon happens on the 19th? Could it serve as a catalyst for more of this...whatever it is?


edit on 11-3-2011 by Student X because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:30 AM
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Jeez. I'm kind of nervous here. I live about 200 miles from the park. Should I pack up the dog and cat and head east? I swear I had a premonition about this yesterday. Whoa.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:32 AM
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reply to post by bepreparedd
 

Good old SkyTV... The moon will be at its closest to Earth (perigee) this month on March 19 (right on the time of the full moon, as it happens), so I guess they're jumping the gun a bit in that respect. However, this month's perigee will be the closest one for this year. Viz: Fourmilab's Lunar Perigee and Apogee Calculator.

There is however some evidence that perigees and apogees have a correlation with larger quakes, so at least SkyTV got that right.

Best regards,
Mike




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