What does the National Anthem and US Constitution mean to you?

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posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 12:55 PM
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As I stand at a US sporting event last night I take a moment to observe people during the National Anthem. I see people not paying attention, drinking beer, sitting, not facing the flag, eating and not many putting their hands over their heart. Do people in America want freedom? Do they appriciate all that died, their bravery and sacrifices to bring this country freedom? How many Americans know that the constitution was written to free us for Taxation without Representation which includes income tax, but do you still pay income tax, yup. Does anyone care that Obama can now detain you indefinetly even if you are found innocent in a court of law? He can as of a few days ago. What does Thomas Jefferson mean to you and the warning he left us about bankers and the control of money? Will we all end up homeless on the very land our founding father fought to defend and bring freedom to? What of those that fought in wars for our freedom and died or had their lives altered forever being left to suffer in horribly funded VA hospitals? Is this important to anyone?

To me the US Constitution was a gift of freedom, a blanket of saftey from Kings, Dictators and Tyranny. A chance for people of all nations and all colors and genders to learn and succeed if life. A safe place to let children grow. A land free to explorer and love. A land that accepted those that wanted to be free of their countries control. A land free of fear and oppression.

For those that don't know.... When National Anthem plays you should be standing tall and straight, you should be facing the flag with either your hand over your heart or hands crossed behind your back and you should be silent. For this is not just a song it is a tribute, a memorial and a thank you to all that made this country great. It is for my great grandfather that served in World War II, my grandfather that served in Viet Nam, my cousins that server in Iraq and all other great grandfathers, grandfathers, grandmas, dads, moms, sisters, brothers, cousins that served to give and keep freedom in this country for all.

The US Constitution is quickly becoming invisible and obsolete by the passing of laws that are mostlty unknown by the American people. I see the American choosing ignorance over freedom, stagnancy over happiness, entertainment over education. So if you live in this country ask your self, does this feel like the land of the free? Does it feel like the home of the brave? My Country 'Tis of Thee, or My Country 'Tis a Theif.

God Bless
edit on 10-3-2011 by mileslong54 because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 01:01 PM
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post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions



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edit on 10-3-2011 by getreadyalready because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 01:02 PM
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wow chill out, its only a song



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 01:03 PM
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reply to post by AOA2012
 


Your right, that was the idea and belief people had in creating America in the first place.
edit on 10-3-2011 by mileslong54 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 01:06 PM
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reply to post by mileslong54
 


No, the Constitution was not written to free us from taxation without representation. It was written to set up a system of government, with appropriate checks and balances, for the United States. The Declaration of Independence set out the reasons the 13 colonies were seperating themselves from Great Britain, one of which was the taxation without representation. The Declaration is not, and never was, a document used to govern the US.

As for your questions, since I live in Maryland, the National Anthem means quite a lot to me seeing as how the events that inspired it happened not too far up the Chesapeake Bay from where I live. It's damned hard to sing, but I like it that way. I hate it when some singer messes with the tempo (hint: It's not a dirge or a hymn, it was originally a drinking song) or throws stupid trills and pauses not originally part of the song so as to make it "personal". Sorry, it's not personal, it's the National Anthem so sing it correctly.

I revere the Constitution but not to the point of idiocy. It is a document that was intended to be a living and changing thing, not petrified in amber. We and our needs and concerns are not the same as the drafters of the Constitution and they knew that when they wrote it. It's not a bad document to base a system of government and laws on.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 01:09 PM
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reply to post by AOA2012
 


Yes I hear on that point makes absolute sense and logic lets get rid of the concepts lets move forward!



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 01:09 PM
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reply to post by LibertyLover
 


As per the constitution, Income tax is unconstitutional but your paying it right. Apparently no one knows what our constitution says anymore. Yea the Constitution was created to create a government free from the opressions of England, ie TAXATION without representation
edit on 10-3-2011 by mileslong54 because: (no reason given)
edit on 10-3-2011 by mileslong54 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 01:11 PM
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reply to post by mileslong54
 


What does the National Anthem and US Constitution mean to you?,


That a once-great-country has lost its way...


Thanks for the reminder.





posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 01:28 PM
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reply to post by mileslong54
 


The Constitution is a great document, one that should be studied deeply. Preferably in the complete absence of flags and anthems.

The anthem and the flag are symbols. Symbols are means of conditioning and thought control. They are shorthand designed to cause specific reactions in people, often regardless of who is wielding said symbols. The fact is that people are only trained to look at the flag when listening to the anthem or reciting the incredibly creepy pledge of allegiance, not to think about the principles of our nation or the state of our land. After all, neither the flag nor the anthem convey any significant information about this country, how it should be run or what it can be. This is brainswashing and conditioning that has allowed generations of traitors to hide behind a piece of fabric while performing vile acts against the American people.

Witness the flag lapel pins on politicans who supported the USA Patriot Act.

The Constitution, on the other hand, is a complex document that establishes a foundation for our country. Note the word foundation. An entire house of precedent, law, statute and amendment has been built on that foundation and must be acknowledged and contended with. Some parts of that house are run down or shoddily constructed, but that is a thought for a different thread.

The Constitution should be revered in its historical context but not fetishized. It is an important document whose fundmental elements regarding individual rights and separation of powers should be respected and followed, but you can't use it as some sort of weird piecemeal ABSOLUTE where those parts that you agree with are set in stone and those parts you don't are ignored.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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reply to post by mileslong54
 


No taxation without representation.... do you understand the meaning? The citizens ARE represented by their senators and house members.

The colonies were NOT represented to England.

Different circumstances.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 02:03 PM
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reply to post by RustyShakleford92
 


So you think the money we pay in taxes are going to good use. Billions of dollars in bailouts put on the back of US people. Yea that's good representation!



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 02:12 PM
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reply to post by mileslong54
 


No, I don't think it's going to good use, but we ARE represented.

Americans don't want to research the candidates or vote for third parties. So they vote red or blue and stick with it for life from my perspective. Americans CAN have excellent representation, but it is in their choosing not to. I don't know if you're one of the people who believe the whole government system is set up, but it's definitely not. I used to live across the street from John Runyan, former Eagles lineman and now NJ congressman. He is a multimillionaire and if I were him to be honest, I would not be bothered with politics. BUT he genuinely wanted change. Definitely not put in by any NWO so to speak. So there are honest people out there who want a serious change, but people are ignorant or don't care.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 02:15 PM
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reply to post by RustyShakleford92
 


I agree, Thanks! That's kind of my point, do people care about the freedoms they have been given. I believe in this government in it's true form but most seem to forget what the true form of democracy means.

Thanks
edit on 10-3-2011 by mileslong54 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 02:15 PM
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To me it means people risked their lives and died to form this great country to escape the tyranny and lack of freedoms of their old land. The same freedoms they were seeking our elected govt is now systematically taking away from us. History repeats itself and things will come full circle.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 02:30 PM
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Brain washing...

Let me tell you something, back in 70’s in Iran when you wanted to watch a simple movie in theatres just before the movie starts you’d stand up and listen to anthem with the images of shah and the glories of the Pahlavi dynasty and how Iranians should be proud of their achievements. Every time, every movies.. click back on tv.. and story continued.. the radio?? 24/7 on both SW/MW and later FM…

I asked what the hell is this..? (the answer was shut up and follow).

What is the national anthem..?? Aren’t we human forced to live on this planet? Do I have a choice where to be born?

What is national anthem..??



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 02:36 PM
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reply to post by amkia
 


If you are born in America you have many choices. You may move anywhere you wish or to any number of other countries. If you were born in Iran or North Korea you don't have those choices. And God forbid you would be born a woman in Saudia Arabia, Afghanistan, Iran... you would barely have any rights.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 02:46 PM
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Reply to post by RobertAntonWeishaupt
 


Exactly this.

I do not recite the pledge because as a citizen of the united States, that were founded on dissent, it is quite contrary to pledge an oath of fealty.

As for the national anthem, I will stand quietly in remembrance of the people who fought for our united States.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 02:55 PM
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reply to post by amkia
 


No you can't choose where you are born but here in the US you have many of your former people living here and accepted here that made their trip to find a better life.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 03:01 PM
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Originally posted by mileslong54
reply to post by LibertyLover
 


As per the constitution, Income tax is unconstitutional but your paying it right. Apparently no one knows what our constitution says anymore. Yea the Constitution was created to create a government free from the opressions of England, ie TAXATION without representation
edit on 10-3-2011 by mileslong54 because: (no reason given)
edit on 10-3-2011 by mileslong54 because: (no reason given)


Please give me the Article and Section in the Constitution that you believe makes income tax illegal. I need some amusement this weekend.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 03:28 PM
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reply to post by LibertyLover
 


Not illegal unconstitutional.

Source www.infoplease.com...

a little history lesson

History of the Income Tax in the United States
Source: Tax Foundation.
The nation had few taxes in its early history. From 1791 to 1802, the United States government was supported by internal taxes on distilled spirits, carriages, refined sugar, tobacco and snuff, property sold at auction, corporate bonds, and slaves. The high cost of the War of 1812 brought about the nation's first sales taxes on gold, silverware, jewelry, and watches. In 1817, however, Congress did away with all internal taxes, relying on tariffs on imported goods to provide sufficient funds for running the government.

In 1862, in order to support the Civil War effort, Congress enacted the nation's first income tax law. It was a forerunner of our modern income tax in that it was based on the principles of graduated, or progressive, taxation and of withholding income at the source. During the Civil War, a person earning from $600 to $10,000 per year paid tax at the rate of 3%. Those with incomes of more than $10,000 paid taxes at a higher rate. Additional sales and excise taxes were added, and an “inheritance” tax also made its debut. In 1866, internal revenue collections reached their highest point in the nation's 90-year history—more than $310 million, an amount not reached again until 1911.

The Act of 1862 established the office of Commissioner of Internal Revenue. The Commissioner was given the power to assess, levy, and collect taxes, and the right to enforce the tax laws through seizure of property and income and through prosecution. The powers and authority remain very much the same today.

In 1868, Congress again focused its taxation efforts on tobacco and distilled spirits and eliminated the income tax in 1872. It had a short-lived revival in 1894 and 1895. In the latter year, the U.S. Supreme Court decided that the income tax was unconstitutional because it was not apportioned among the states in conformity with the Constitution.

In 1913, the 16th Amendment to the Constitution made the income tax a permanent fixture in the U.S. tax system. The amendment gave Congress legal authority to tax income and resulted in a revenue law that taxed incomes of both individuals and corporations. In fiscal year 1918, annual internal revenue collections for the first time passed the billion-dollar mark, rising to $5.4 billion by 1920. With the advent of World War II, employment increased, as did tax collections—to $7.3 billion. The withholding tax on wages was introduced in 1943 and was instrumental in increasing the number of taxpayers to 60 million and tax collections to $43 billion by 1945.

In 1981, Congress enacted the largest tax cut in U.S. history, approximately $750 billion over six years. The tax reduction, however, was partially offset by two tax acts, in 1982 and 1984, that attempted to raise approximately $265 billion.

On Oct. 22, 1986, President Reagan signed into law the Tax Reform Act of 1986, one of the most far-reaching reforms of the United States tax system since the adoption of the income tax. The top tax rate on individual income was lowered from 50% to 28%, the lowest it had been since 1916. Tax preferences were eliminated to make up most of the revenue. In an attempt to remain revenue neutral, the act called for a $120 billion increase in business taxation and a corresponding decrease in individual taxation over a five-year period.

Following what seemed to be a yearly tradition of new tax acts that began in 1986, the Revenue Reconciliation Act of 1990 was signed into law on Nov. 5, 1990. As with the '87, '88, and '89 acts, the 1990 act, while providing a number of substantive provisions, was small in comparison with the 1986 act. The emphasis of the 1990 act was increased taxes on the wealthy.

On Aug. 10, 1993, President Clinton signed the Revenue Reconciliation Act of 1993 into law. The act's purpose was to reduce by approximately $496 billion the federal deficit that would otherwise accumulate in fiscal years 1994 through 1998. In 1997, Clinton signed another tax act. The act, which cut taxes by $152 billion, included a cut in capital-gains tax for individuals, a $500 per child tax credit, and tax incentives for education.

President George W. Bush signed a series of tax cuts into law. The largest was the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001. It was estimated to save taxpayers $1.3 trillion over ten years, making it the third largest tax cut since World War II. The Bush tax cut created a new lowest rate, 10% for the first several thousand dollars earned. It also established a slow schedule of incremental tax cuts that would eventually double the child tax credit from $500 to $1,000, adjust brackets so that middle-income couples owed the same tax as comparable singles, cut the top four tax rates (28% to 25%; 31% to 28%; 36% to 33%; and 39.6% to 35%).

The Jobs and Growth Tax Relief and Reconciliation Act of 2003 accelerated the tax rate cuts that had been enacted in 2001, and temporarily reduced the tax rate on capital gains and dividends to 15%. In 2004, the U.S. was forced to eliminate a corporate tax provision that had been ruled illegal by the World Trade Organization. Along with that tax hike, Congress passed a cornucopia of tax breaks, which for individuals included an option to deduct the payment of whichever state taxes were higher, sales or income taxes.

Two tax bills signed in 2005 and 2006 extended through 2010 the favorable rates on capital gains and dividends that had been enacted in 2003, raised the exemption levels for the Alternative Minimum Tax, and enacted new tax incentives designed to persuade individuals to save more for retirement.

The problem....

This argument is based on the premise that all federal income tax laws are unconstitutional because the Sixteenth Amendment was not officially ratified, or because the State of Ohio was not properly a state at the time of ratification.



edit on 10-3-2011 by mileslong54 because: (no reason given)
edit on 10-3-2011 by mileslong54 because: (no reason given)
edit on 10-3-2011 by mileslong54 because: (no reason given)





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