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Deer just now rutting in Missouri?.

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posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 09:10 AM
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I have a friend that came to me yesterday with a question that was hoping he could get answered
with the help of all of my fellow ATSers.

He has a cabin in Southern Missouri where we dear hunt every year.
Deer rutting season (mating season) is in November.
That is when they lose their antlers as well.

Well, it is the middle of march and according to him,
they are just now rutting and still have their antlers.
He is damn near a professional deer hunter and would not be alarmed if this was in any way normal.

So, is there anyone here that might know why this is happening?

Thanks ATS!




posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 09:18 AM
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While some hunters swear by the reliability of the rutting moon and other aspects of moon phase hunting at helping them predict deer behavior, other hunters think it is a sharp drop in temperature that triggers peak breeding. This is one of those battles for the ages that hunters debate about year-after-year, decade-after-decade. Adding to the confusion is the fact that average peak rut dates differ from state-to-state and region-to-region. For example, rut dates in the South can be significantly later than they are in the Northern and Mid-Western states.


This may be..I don't know


rutting moon



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 09:18 AM
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Not true. Deer have their antlers in November as this is the normal rutting season and they use them to fight with other bucks during this period. Most deer shed their antlers between January and April. However, I am sure it varies from state to state. Further, if there is a doe who did not mate during the rut I suppose she could still come into heat until she mates, and of course the bucks would still fight over her.

www.buckmanager.com...
edit on 10-3-2011 by IamAbeliever because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 09:20 AM
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reply to post by IamAbeliever
 


So you are saying that it is normal for deer to rut in November??
Seriously?

I just know that for this part of the country
***I am told*** that deer still having their antlers at this time of year is unheard of.
hmmmm

edit on 10-3-2011 by Screwed because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 09:24 AM
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reply to post by Screwed
 


Well, I just did a couple minutes worth of research (mainly here). While I'm not a hunter, my father is, and he knows as well as your friend that deer typically mate around November. As that site says, this is because the gestation period for deer is about 200 days, and, like everything else, they want to have their babies when there's a good chance of survival - when there's a good food supply. That means they would want to give birth in spring, which means they have to mate in November.

Mating in March, though, means they'll be giving birth in late September. Is there a decent food supply there at that time for it to be worthwhile for some deer to give birth then?
If not, then it's certainly unusual. Not unheard of, I'm sure, but unusual, nonetheless. Maybe they're expecting a mild fall/winter?
edit on 10-3-2011 by CLPrime because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 09:26 AM
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Very interesting OP.
I don't ever remember hearing of the rut occurring in Spring (at least we are very close to it).

I have seen the rut come early and late, but only by a period of a few weeks, not months. My experience usually seemed to link the onset of the rut with lower air temperatures in the Fall. My question would be whether the does are in estrous or not. That would really be weird, possibly catastrophic for the deer population. If the does are bred now, that would have them dropping fawns in November! That would not work out so good for a fawn, being born near the onset of winter.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 09:27 AM
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reply to post by Screwed
 


www.trmichels.com...

According to this page the rut for Missouri is Oct-Dec. The info is near the bottom of the page. Shows state by state when the rut occurs.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 09:28 AM
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reply to post by Screwed
 


Although I had not heard this yet, it's really not that surprising... Birds, fish, horses, dolphins etc dying around the world. All the planets are warming up while scientists are crying out about superstorms. Just add this to everything else.

Hell I have had daff-o-dills and suprise lillies showing in my yard since the last week of February and the trees have alreaded budded. I watched snow in direct sunlight melt in -10* temps. I even read a report on another persons blog claiming that Robin's had already began laying their little blue eggs in January.

The only thing that is for certain anymore, is that nature is all out of whack.
edit on 10-3-2011 by OatDelphi because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 09:30 AM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


Yeah, I'm saying it is a huge conspiracy or anything and was not trying to start the next huge mega thread worthy of 200 flags.
I just love ats because it is so easy to pick the brains of people....actual people,
not websites and find out answers to questions from people with experience.
thanks for the input.
I will relay the info.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 09:34 AM
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Originally posted by butcherguy
Very interesting OP.
I don't ever remember hearing of the rut occurring in Spring (at least we are very close to it).

I have seen the rut come early and late, but only by a period of a few weeks, not months.. If the does are bred now, that would have them dropping fawns in November! That would not work out so good for a fawn, being born near the onset of winter.


This is exactly what he said.
Thanks for your input.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 09:35 AM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 





As that site says, this is because the gestation period for deer is about 200 days,
I don't want to argue the info you have, but my experience here in Pennsylvania with whitetail deer is that mating occurs from late September through early November. Fawns are dropped from late May through early June. That indicates a gestational period of around 8 months.
If the does are bred in March, they would be dropping fawns around Oct/Nov.

I don't know, but rutting in March is def weird, I am going to look for more info.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 09:38 AM
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reply to post by Screwed
 


If dad saw deer rutting now around here, I'm sure he'd be just as confused. Maybe even a little concerned, that the deer population here would then be at risk, because the chance of the next generation surviving the winter isn't exactly promising.
Of course (and this is just pure speculation and dot-connecting on my part - I'm not one to be fear-mongering and whatnot), if the deer sense that something's not right with nature, they may just be mating now in a, possible vain, attempt at getting the next generation in before whatever happens happens. It may be important that they consider the threat of winter to be worth the risk - it might hint that they think something worse could be coming.
But, again, that's just speculation on one possibility. Nature just seems to have a way of knowing what's going to be thrown at it.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 09:43 AM
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I have a friend in SW Missouri and SE Kansas. He hikes out into the chat piles every November and kills his limit of deer on the first weekend with a Bow and Arrow (and on one occasion a knife!). He usually hikes longer than he hunts. He is an expert in all things deer and wilderness related in that area. I have put a call into him for an opinion on this subject. Hopefully he responds quickly this morning. I had a missed call from him earlier today, so I know he has his phone today.

I am from Southern Missouri, and the Rut is definitely mostly in November. Deer Season typically opens for primitive weapons in October and then opens for rifles in November. Antlers are not typically seen in the Spring.

I'll post back as soon as I get a more knowledgeable opinion than my own.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 09:47 AM
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I think that if the female deer are not bred in the normal mating season they will come back into heat. If a saw more than a few does in heat I would wonder if they had miscarried and that was bringing them back into heat. Another possibility is the very real fear of estrogen and estrogen like compounds found in groundwater causing disruptions in normal mating cycles. Pure speculation however there are some real concerns that many people have regarding these things.
edit on 3/10/2011 by iforget because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 09:49 AM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Much appreciated.

If this is something that has happened in times past due to whatever circumstances
it is one thing.
If it is completely unheard of then my next mission will be to get pics I suppose.
But there will be no way to PROVE that it is actually March in the pics so it is pointless.
He claims that he has them on a trail cam, antlers and all.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 09:53 AM
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reply to post by Screwed
 


umm, just set a recent newspaper/magazine next to the antlers you want to photo... that would be pretty sufficient proof.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 10:01 AM
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Originally posted by Screwed
reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Much appreciated.

If this is something that has happened in times past due to whatever circumstances
it is one thing.
If it is completely unheard of then my next mission will be to get pics I suppose.
But there will be no way to PROVE that it is actually March in the pics so it is pointless.
He claims that he has them on a trail cam, antlers and all.

Most of todays trailcams have a time and date stamp on the photo.

Maybe that will help.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 10:05 AM
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From what I can read it is not unheard of for deer to carry antlers until late march with deer in good condition carrying them for longer.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 10:14 AM
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Originally posted by iforget
From what I can read it is not unheard of for deer to carry antlers until late march with deer in good condition carrying them for longer.
Definitely not unheard of, but rare.
From my own experience more tend to lose antlers earlier than late, but a lot of that can be due to the surrounding flora. A deer that spends most of his time in low scrub may hold his antlers longer than one that lives in higher brush. They will knock them off, (whether intentionally or not,I don't know) on brush that is substantial enough to do the job.
In PA, bucks will usually not have their antlers past mid-January. Some will lose them as early as late November.

ETA: Good gravy, all these responses and no stars or flags for the OP? I changed that.
edit on 10-3-2011 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 10:20 AM
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reply to post by butcherguy
 


Thanks I dont disagree the OP also stated that he had noticed does in heat still. I wonder if that alone could be keeping the bucks testosterone up preventing them from shedding their antlers. The may just not be done breeding yet.



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