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NASA disavows its scientist's claim of alien life

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posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 03:11 PM
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What? And your are?! Get real and stop being a smart a*s. He was just being a critique of questionable evidence. That's what a smart guy does. He does not immediately accept "what they say" just because they all have PhDs. That's BS.


 
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posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 03:18 PM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 


So you accept the opinions of anyone who agrees with you and automatically dismiss those who don't. Interesting. What makes you so sure which are right? Maybe the problem is that you don't run a weather and earth science news blog?


reply to post by ag893
 


Cheers mate


Of course, I may be wrong. Only time will tell.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 03:18 PM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 


I have more experience with the peer-review process than most people on here. I have a paper currently in press in an undergrad journal that I submitted last May and didn't hear back on until last week. I have another paper that was submitted to Motivation and Emotion also last May and I have yet to hear back on it. The peer-review process is a time consuming one. So, assuming this scientist went through the normal avenues to get a paper published, especially one potentially as groundbreaking as this, it would explain why he has had this hypothesis for years yet is only now getting published in a journal whose reputation is less than stellar. I also know statistics so I can state with absolute certainty that you are going to get no understanding of what the scientific community thinks by reading reviews on the article on the same website that it is posted.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 03:22 PM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 


Once again, this scientist has been pitching his research for years now. Considering that he works at NASA it is very likely he had colleagues review his work. It's not like this is out of left field for them. They were aware of his work and the methods he used to achieve his results. That is why they were so quick to make a press release stating their opinion on the article. They have read it and heard about it for years.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 03:40 PM
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Originally posted by Essan
reply to post by GoldenFleece
 


So you accept the opinions of anyone who agrees with you and automatically dismiss those who don't. Interesting. What makes you so sure which are right?

I'm not sure that I am right.

What I object to is NASA throwing cold water on one of their own scientists research A FEW DAYS LATER just because it doesn't fit their ridiculous paradigm that "there's no intelligent life (or ancient bacterial life) anywhere in the universe."

And Xcalibur, how does one go from being a recent psych grad with a part-time grocery job (IIRC) to being an expert in peer-reviewed journals?



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 03:48 PM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 


I have written research papers that synthesize information from a lot of different fields, so I know what journals tend to publish the biggest findings and are the most respected. I have submitted two papers for peer-review, which is more than most people on this site can say. I was on friendly terms with my professors and regularly talked with them about their past research. I have also been in contact with scientists who are at the top of their fields and discussed their research with them for grad school. Not to mention that I have presented research at two major conferences which also required a peer-review process. Now, what have you done that makes you presume you know more about the peer-review process than me?



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 03:57 PM
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ATS has 217,918 members.

What are the chances that this thread would draw the undivided attention of two known universal skeptics of almost everything discussed on ATS -- one who claims he joined ATS specifically for it's alien and UFO discussions?



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 05:04 PM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 


The probability is 1 as we are both in here. Thank you for the compliment of universal skeptic though, I find the best way to approach these fringe topics is with a skeptical mind as it is the only way progress will be made. Take UFOlogy for example, a skeptical mind like Dr. J. Allen Hynek has done more for the field than all the David Icke's, Stan Romanek's, Blossom Goodchild's, etc. put together. The skeptical mind is absolutely crucial in a case such as this article or discussions on Nibiru, because if it weren't for them this website would devolve into believers arguing over their different New Age beliefs and no progress would be made.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 06:22 PM
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Originally posted by Essan
reply to post by Leto
 


Fair enough, But I was sceptical of the claims - I don't think even basic life will evolve on small asteroids, so where did the supposed fossils come from? Anyway, there were lots of questions and it appears I wasn't the only one asking.

edit on 10-3-2011 by Essan because: (no reason given)


Not from Earth, that's what's important. Seems to me the next step would be to find out if any of our neighboring planets have microorganisms, and if so we'd compare it to our own and see if we share the same origin. If that meteor hit us, chances are our neighbors been hit by fragments originating from the same source.
edit on 10-3-2011 by Leto because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 10:34 AM
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Originally posted by Leto

Originally posted by Essan
reply to post by Leto
 


Fair enough, But I was sceptical of the claims - I don't think even basic life will evolve on small asteroids, so where did the supposed fossils come from? Anyway, there were lots of questions and it appears I wasn't the only one asking.

edit on 10-3-2011 by Essan because: (no reason given)


Not from Earth, that's what's important. Seems to me the next step would be to find out if any of our neighboring planets have microorganisms, and if so we'd compare it to our own and see if we share the same origin. If that meteor hit us, chances are our neighbors been hit by fragments originating from the same source.
edit on 10-3-2011 by Leto because: (no reason given)


Speculation. I would like it to be alien as much as everyone else would on here, but the fact of the matter is that is the problem with this data, the possibility (not saying fact) that these fibers are not alien bacteria, but earthly contamination. Not saying this isn't worth more research and discussion, but it is certainly not proof of alien life.




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