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England's 17th century witch chronicles put online

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posted on Mar, 8 2011 @ 04:51 PM
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Well, this one was a bit hard to place in most of the forums as it could very well touch on quite a few topics such as religion, paranormal, health and wellness or even survival if you wanted to get too picky about it


But, here it is, the 17th century witch chronicles online and free to read.

I found it in one of the most odd places.. a news web site from the Philippines.. of all places..
Here's what they had to say;

A 350-year-old notebook which documents the trials of women convicted of witchcraft in England during the 17th century has been published online. The notebook written by Nehemiah Wallington, an English Puritan, recounts the fate of women accused of having relationships with the devil at a time when England was embroiled in a bitter civil war.

The document reveals the details of a witchcraft trial held in Chelmsford in July 1645, when more than a hundred suspected witches were serving time in Essex and Suffolk according to his account. "Divers (many) of them voluntarily and without any forcing or compulsion freely declare that they have made a covenant with the Devill," he wrote. "Som Christians have been killed by their meanes," he added.

www.gmanews.tv...

I am yet to read any of it myself, thought I'd share it with you all before I get my nose into it. It might prove to be rather useful for those in the paranormal field or even in religious studies. It brings to light the way that TPTB (of the time) used fear to get what they wanted..

I hope that this becomes rather useful for many.. If not, then I'm sure it will be an interesting read...
The FULL digitised book online

Just to add a snippet of helpful info..

If you would like to find a specific entry, say, about witch trials, simply search for ‘witchcraft’.

chiccmanchester.wordpress.com...
edit on 8-3-2011 by Extralien because: added help tip.




posted on Mar, 8 2011 @ 05:05 PM
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reply to post by Extralien
 


I was able to briefly click on a few pages and WOW. I am so excited to take some time to actually read this "thing". So much history here, and the language! Thank you so much for positng this! S&F!!



posted on Mar, 8 2011 @ 05:06 PM
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reply to post by Extralien
 


Superb discovery Extralien


Infinite cheers for sharing - I'm off to read more from this fascinating insight into history!


edit on 8/3/11 by lizziejayne because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2011 @ 05:16 PM
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Isn't it strange how different parts of the country responded differently to this, I think there has only ever been less than a handfull of trials of witches (men and women) here (Sussex) and only one (bewitching by posioning) in 1575 ended in the death sentence, while another one in 1591 saw Agnes Mowser convicted of bewitiching Ann Flemens to death but was sentenced to only one year's imprisonment.

Thanks for the linky tho
I've always found this an interesting topic



posted on Mar, 8 2011 @ 05:21 PM
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Im not into witches and stuff, but can i ask is this in connection with the Salem witch trials?



posted on Mar, 9 2011 @ 01:11 AM
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reply to post by Whereweheaded
 


Of sorts, yes...

The best-known trials were conducted by the Court of Oyer and Terminer in 1692 in Salem Town. Over 150 people were arrested and imprisoned, with even more accused but not formally pursued by the authorities. All twenty-six who went to trial before this court were convicted. The four sessions of the Superior Court of Judicature in 1693, held in Salem Village, but also in Ipswich, Boston and Charlestown, produced only three convictions in the thirty-one witchcraft trials it conducted. The two courts convicted twenty-nine people of the capital felony of witchcraft. Nineteen of the accused, fourteen women and five men, were executed by hanging.[1] One man, Giles Corey, refused to enter a plea and was crushed to death under heavy stones in an attempt to force him to do so. At least five more of the accused died in prison.

"The Puritans" were a political and religious party in England beginning in the mid-16th century. The party, influenced by Calvinism, opposed many of the traditions of the new Protestant Church of England, including the Book of Common Prayer, the use of priestly vestments (cap and gown) during services, the use of the Holy Cross during baptism, and kneeling during the sacrament, all of which constituted "popery". In the 17th century, England erupted in civil war, with the Puritan Party winning and executing King Charles I. This success was short-lived as the Commonwealth's failure under the Lord Protector's successor Richard Cromwell led to restoration of the old order under Charles II. Emigration to Massachusetts Colony by Puritans during this almost constant state of political upheaval resulted in a population of settlers both fervently religious and politically astute. Self-governance came naturally to them, and building a society based on their religious beliefs was their goal.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Mar, 9 2011 @ 09:37 AM
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reply to post by Extralien
 


Hope you dont mind, but copied your info, and thread links and forwarded them via email to my girlfriend. shes into all that stuff.

Thanks for the info.... defiantly enlightening and a different thread from the " usual " dog and pony show.



posted on Mar, 9 2011 @ 02:57 PM
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reply to post by Whereweheaded
 


Not a problem.. it's free to read it anyway and the more who see it the better


Even for those interested in the civil war... and of course the pilgrims to Salem..




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