Harmonic Tremor in Arkansas? Hope Not!

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posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 07:31 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 
Forgive my ignorance, 'puterman, but could these waves be linked to the natural hot springs that are in Arkansas? I know very little about such matters; i prefer to read what you and WC and the rest of the gang have to say.

Thanks to all of you that are so active in these threads; definitely helps increase the learning curve...

seeker




posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 07:33 PM
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Uh oh, big quake coming in off the west coast...let's see...

This will be at around 1:27 UTC or so... Man! long decay... I'm going to say 4.9 to 5.5 maybe more..
edit on Mon Mar 7th 2011 by TrueAmerican because: (no reason given)


Yeppers. 5.0
earthquake.usgs.gov...
edit on Mon Mar 7th 2011 by TrueAmerican because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 07:47 PM
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reply to post by DogsDogsDogs
 



Puterman, have you done this thing with HAARP doing whatever it does and with ELF transmissions? What is that tone that keeps repeating? Oh, and I don't know if harmonic tremors are literally "harmonic", but musically speaking, there is a dual harmonic tone at 7:16/ 7:17 (as if you are tuning a guitar)


Here is that same section at only 5x speed.

snippetWLAR.mp3

You can hear that is electrical (I would guess) and yes you can hear an harmonic of the hum and guess what - it is the same as the hum from the computer! The background sounds like wind and the noise is ?? not sure - could be water or could be vehicle. This seismo is near a big dam is it not?

Yes harmonic tremors are literally harmonic, that is why they are called that.



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 07:49 PM
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reply to post by the seeker_713g
 


Ah, said could be water so yes that is possible as believe this to be down that area. I will get a location for it and get back to you. It certainly has some similarities to Yellowstone sounds.

Had a feeling this was near the dam.

WLAR Location

I see poison Spring not too far away so yes it could be water.
edit on 7/3/2011 by PuterMan because: (no reason given)


This spectrum of that small section is fascinating.



You can actually see the regular pattern here and can hear it as well. Note the main 'hum' at just under 1 kHz (50x speed) and the harmonic of it very faint at just under 2 kHz and a sub-harmonic at just under 800Hz and even a very faint harmonic of that at 1600Hz.

The pattern peaks at around 36Hz real time so not idea what that might be.
edit on 7/3/2011 by PuterMan because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 08:09 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


Great, just so long as we don't see this:



or anything like it. That's another known ht signature on spectrograph from Mt. Erebus.



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 08:13 PM
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Voila (and I concur, no HTs):


It slowly rises from 20.5 Hz at 15:13:40 to 28 Hz at 15:14:24, rises to 42.8 Hz for 15 seconds, then suddenly drops to 24 Hz at 15:29:49, slowly rises to 42-ish Hz at 15:41:55, and just sorta fades out from there.



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 08:15 PM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


Look at the Hz on those. 2, 4, 6, 8 Hz for the Harmonics.

Above we are looking at 20Hz and a very faint 40Hz for the main noise.



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 08:17 PM
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reply to post by Thought Provoker
 


So glad we agree!

line 2



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 08:17 PM
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So there ya have it folks. No HT at Arkansas, but the signature I feel was worth posting and questioning about. Cause it does sort of resemble a real one. Susan can at least breathe a sigh of relief on that.

So if you ever see something like that- thick, dense, relatively consistent amplitude, and longggggggggggggg- post it and ask. As you can see, we do have the resources to check it out more deeply.



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 08:20 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


I'm still a bit curious and maybe off track. But if you were fracking a new well with thousands of gallons of fluid and the background noise of the pump for quite a length of time. Would that sound of water and pump noise traveling thru the water, not be heard as some sort of harmonics for some distance?



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 08:27 PM
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reply to post by herenow
 


I have no doubt that if the seismo was reasonably close to a well then yes you would indeed hear the crackle of the fracking and probably the sound of the pumps and maybe even the water as an harmonic, but I doubt that is the case here as this seismo sits right by the lake so wind or water lapping could account for rhythmic noise.

It also depends what the dam is, i.e. does it serve any function other than a simple dam to create a reservoir. If it is a reservoir, where is the outlet. What sort of outlet is it etc. You cannot simply say that a sound from the waveform sounds like x because it is speeded up. Played at 100Hz you would not hear it at all hardly. (Actually 100Hz seismos you can just hear but 40Hz or 20Hz are impossible.)



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 08:31 PM
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Oooppsss! I was trying to reply on this thread and accidentally started a new thread, but Puterman you and everyone else deserve it. I can't thank you enough for taking the time, checking and double checking that. You are greatly appreciated as well as everyone else. I was about to load up and leave and run for higher ground. I can't thank you enough. Still may not sleep well tonight but at least I'm no running scared to death.



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 08:38 PM
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I ran the mp3 file through my audio software, and my dog starting barking his head off, and had to quit playing it due to all of the growling and other things they were doing...very odd.

But, I uploaded it up to ATS and it is below, have a look, won't you; but what about those intervals? I didn't see those on any other spectrographic image. Anyone have any insight as to what is represented on the spectrographic image?




Could this be some sort of EM pattern indicating use of EM Drilling heads? I hear they, the oil companies, are using this type of drill head in the area. I'll check Google for the frequencies those drill heads are supposed to be operated at and add the information to this post.

I looked for the frequency range and Wikipedia has a range of 50 and 120 hertz for Sonic (vibratory) drilling frequencies. Unknown if Sonic is the same as EM drilling. Anyone have thoughts to share?
edit on 7-3-2011 by trekwebmaster because: Additional Information



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 08:44 PM
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Puterman, you might make sure you are pulling AG.WLAR, March 7th, 15:14 UTC and forward... Just want confirmation on that.



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 08:59 PM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


No I am pulling faces


The file starts at 11:00 (actually 10:59:59) and has 7 hours of data taking it to 18:00. That is 2,520,194 items of data at 100Hz which is 25,201.94 seconds of data. I will leave you to do the math.


edit on 7/3/2011 by PuterMan because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 08:59 PM
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reply to post by westcoast
 


OMG....I know you are looking at Arkansas....but today I was just looking at the Pineville and Goldonna Louisiana siesmo on GEE...because my Mom is there...and it looked EXACTLY like the ones you just posted! I was going to take a screen shot and post it, but I didn't....the big stream of zig zags just like that...and then it was like the other with a basically steady line with spaced out bursts just like that. Im really getting nervous....do I need to worry here?



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 09:01 PM
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reply to post by StealthyKat
 


The simple straight forward answer? NO

The complex long drawn out answer? NO

By the way do you have the code for that one? I would like to pull some data and have a listen.
edit on 7/3/2011 by PuterMan because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 09:06 PM
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reply to post by trekwebmaster
 



Could this be some sort of EM pattern indicating use of EM Drilling heads? I hear they, the oil companies, are using this type of drill head in the area. I'll check Google for the frequencies those drill heads are supposed to be operated at and add the information to this post.


Interesting. Never heard of this. Please do find out what you can. The noise is some sort of (electrical?) signal, and it has been seen on many seismos.

By the way TA if you look on the spectrogram that trekwebmaster posted you can see the Hz drop section that Thought Provoker posted. You need to slide it across.



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 09:07 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


Thankyou! I was just wondering because it looked just like that, but I don't know how to read them.....I appreciate you taking time to answer so quick!



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 09:08 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


lol, hey, no need to get persnickety with me! Just being sure. While it may not matter much to us, it sure as heck matters to Susan. I still gave you a star for the help.





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