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Mysterious Glowing Spiral Sighted in a Remote Star System

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posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 12:32 PM
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None of the world's experts no what the strange spiral structure on the left is. Why the spiral glows is itself a mystery, with a leading hypothesis being illumination by light reflected from nearby stars. NASA astronomers think it is related to a star in a binary star system entering the planetary nebula phase, when its outer atmosphere is ejected. The huge spiral spans about a third of a light year across and, winding four or five complete turns, has a regularity that has never been observed before. Given the expansion rate of the spiral gas, a new layer must appear about every 800 years, a close match to the time it takes for the two stars to orbit each other. The star system that created it is known as LL Pegasi. The image was taken in near-infrared light by the Hubble Space Telescope. Image credit: ESA, Hubble, R. Sahai (JPL), NASA




Seems odd none of the worlds experts know what this is. Considering the spirals we've seen on earth in the recent. On the other hand. Is it the same phenomena? Or are we talking a completely different ballgame here?
Honestly, I'm not sure what to make of it. Wormhole? Dimensional doorway? Natural phenomena we just haven't witnessed before? One thing is certain. I don't think we can blame HAARP for this one.




posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 12:37 PM
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The photo shows an unusual pre-planetary nebula called IRAS 23166+1655 as it is forming around the dust-shrouded star LL Pegasi in the constellation Pegasus
Space.com



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 12:43 PM
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i wonder if this is what the ancients saw
or something like it
hmmm



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 12:44 PM
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reply to post by Abductee001
 

Thanks for posting the link. The article doesn't say if this is a common phenomenon. Or if this is unique in recent history.



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 12:53 PM
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This is only a 2D perspective, in 3 dimensions it's a coil spiral moving towards the observer.

This spiral stuff isn't anything brand new.



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 01:00 PM
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reply to post by Klassified
 

Very strange photo indeed, space.com say it was seen 7 years ago - I bet they haven't seen another?
My grandson has just stumped me with a question, he just asked "What would it look like from the side?"

I don't think it would resemble a spiral from the side, if so could there be more spirals?



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 01:07 PM
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Originally posted by Klassified

Seems odd none of the worlds experts know what this is.



Man's current knowledge of the Universe is VERY VERY limited.

Ask any astronomer and they will tell you that there are far far more things that we don't know about the Universe than what we do.

So in answer to your question.......no it's not at all odd that the world's experts don't know what it is.
edit on 7-3-2011 by Logical one because: (no reason given)


+13 more 
posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 01:12 PM
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It is clearly an ICBM "Bulava" missile failure!


S&F.



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 01:12 PM
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Here's another good one from the Hubble



Hubble bubble: A delicate sphere of gas, imaged by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, floats in the depths of space. The shell, or bubble, is the result of gas that is being shocked by the expanding blast wave from a supernova. Called SNR 0509-67.5 (or SNR 0509 for short), the bubble is the visible remnant of a powerful stellar explosion in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a small galaxy about 160,000 light-years from Earth.





posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 01:30 PM
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Originally posted by Arken
It is clearly an ICBM "Bulava" missile failure!


S&F.


Yes, I'm gonna go with Russian missle test...

Again...



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 01:40 PM
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reply to post by Klassified
 


I’ll wager a guess.

It is a brown dwarf planet. It is a gas giant, just like Saturn. It is orbiting the bright star in the picture, inside of the star’s heliosphere, which is why it is not glowing itself. It is instead reflecting the light off of the nearby star. The star itself is far closer than current theory suggests.

Plasma cosmology states that all star systems are powered externally by currents of electricity flowing through the interstellar plasma medium. We know these currents must exist because our radio telescopes can detect the magnetic currents that accompany them.

Here’s a great ebook that lays out why our notions of stellar distances are wrong, and here are some great papers that lay out why our notions of stars themselves are wrong.

Dr. Donald Scott gives a presentation on plasma cosmology at the NASA Goddard Space Center:



For a layman’s tutorial on plasma cosmology, watch this video.




edit on 7-3-2011 by mnemeth1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 01:54 PM
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Originally posted by Abductee001
reply to post by Klassified
 

Very strange photo indeed, space.com say it was seen 7 years ago - I bet they haven't seen another?
My grandson has just stumped me with a question, he just asked "What would it look like from the side?"

I don't think it would resemble a spiral from the side, if so could there be more spirals?


Who knows. The day may come when we get to see one from the side. That would be cool.



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 01:55 PM
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reply to post by JibbyJedi
 

Interesting connection. I wouldn't have even thought of that.



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 01:58 PM
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reply to post by mnemeth1
 

I'll be watching this vid. And checking out the papers too. I've heard the name Donald Scott, but haven't read anything by him.



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 02:00 PM
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Originally posted by Logical one

Originally posted by Klassified

Seems odd none of the worlds experts know what this is.



Man's current knowledge of the Universe is VERY VERY limited.

Ask any astronomer and they will tell you that there are far far more things that we don't know about the Universe than what we do.

So in answer to your question.......no it's not at all odd that the world's experts don't know what it is.
edit on 7-3-2011 by Logical one because: (no reason given)


Yeah, I should have phrased that differently. They always seem to have an answer, even if they have to make one up.



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 04:32 PM
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Well after doing my recent orb thread, I’m going with dust particle enhanced by the flash.



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 04:35 PM
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Originally posted by Whateva69
Well after doing my recent orb thread, I’m going with dust particle enhanced by the flash.

Because "orbs" can relate to spirals in space right?



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 05:08 PM
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reply to post by hippomchippo
 

This is talcum powder taken by our own ATS member elevenaugust.
To me It looks similar to the OP’s spiral.




posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 07:23 PM
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Looks like that thing that happens when I refresh the "New Topics" page on ATS.

Maybe the universe is getting ready to refresh itself.



posted on Mar, 7 2011 @ 07:57 PM
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reply to post by Klassified
 


Kind of looks like the spiral that showed up over Sweden a while back.



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