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What ever happened to the crystal molecular computer transistor?

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posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 12:03 PM
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A couple of years back I read science links that a team demonstrated a particular single crystal molecule used as a computer transistor that in a group of 16 of such 4-prong molecules more closely mimicked the real functions of our brain neurons. The grouping was connected into a sphere, acting as one receptor/transmitter. Thus multiplying the current on/off binary computer transistors, by an exponential scale of 4X16 squared.

That said it showed a base transistor the freedom to send and receive stimuli from over 4,000 sources instead of just being an on/off switch, like our own brain neurons, and similar visually (imaged) also.

Has anyone ever read anything about this R&D? When I first saw an article from a science based website, it was dubbed ‘The World’s Smallest Computer”. I can’t seem to be able to Google or Dogpile any more information about this, I keep coming up with other things like the millimeter computer, it's not an IBM research effort, though I could be wrong about that. I have heard of the liquid crystal transistor, that's not this.

I know my recollection of the particulars on this may be a bit off or misunderstood, but I wonder why it seemingly has vanished from my search attempts, (people think I’m nuts). Maybe it was just woo.




posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by Illustronic
 

Much of what I used to find on the Internet is not as easily found anymore , it seems that change took place about mid last year .



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 05:40 PM
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reply to post by Truthwerx
 


Funny you should say that, since I joined I have tried to go to many of the links I had saved when I was not a member. Allot of them no longer work. It's not only because the website is not there anymore either. Many of them were not that old.

edit on 3/6/2011 by lonegurkha because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:35 PM
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reply to post by lonegurkha
 





Funny you should say that, since I joined I have tried to go to many of the links I had saved when I was not a member. Allot of them no longer work. It's not only because the website is not there anymore either. Many of them were not that old.


Try archive.org and their wayback machine. Things that disappear are generally saved there.



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 09:08 PM
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reply to post by coyotepoet
 


Thank you I will try that.Your help is appreciated.



posted on Mar, 9 2011 @ 09:12 PM
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I looked at all of your links, none of them inferred a 4 prong molecule, just atomically small binary switches. None of these links (thank you but I found them all on a simple Google search) touched on what I read. What I read (again) was a single molecule with 4 branches combined with a 16-branch sphere acting as one single transistor, like our own brain neurons.

I suppose I never bookmarked the link(s), as I was able to access my old computer cashes, and saved links, as it was before where I am now. I guess, I supposed there would be more developments in this, ( so I never saved a link because they were easy to find then), I thought it was like, NEWS!

So in conclusion, I may have read woo and believed it, (though I can't quote the institutions involved, I found them to be reputable at the time, like the #ing world leaders in the field of nanotechnology).

If I happen to stumble upon any links to this, I most certainly put it out.

Binary squared to the power of 16, not 1-0 anymore! That was the point. Free association with thousands of stimuli/transponders, instantaneously.
edit on 9-3-2011 by Illustronic because: (no reason given)



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