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I'm a muslim. I'm not violent/radical. Tell me I'm lying!

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posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:20 AM
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reply to post by My.mind.is.mine
 


The Burqua?

Thats ok in Islamic countries but I'm afraid I feel it has no place in the Western world however I'm not against the Hajib




posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:21 AM
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reply to post by Sky watcher
 


The Bible is 10,000 years old? What bible?????



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:22 AM
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reply to post by Sky watcher
 


Jesus did'nt come to the Jews......

Jesus WAS born JEWISH

big difference my friend

the rest of your post is utter rubbish



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:23 AM
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reply to post by My.mind.is.mine
 


Hold on, wait for it.........YOU'RE LYING!!!!!



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:32 AM
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Just because one person comes up and says he is god, doesn't make everyone god.



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:34 AM
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reply to post by My.mind.is.mine
 


I often ask myself the same question.

However:
www.cfr.org...

What is Sharia? Also meaning "path" in Arabic, sharia guides all aspects of Muslim life including daily routines, familial and religious obligations, and financial dealings. It is derived primarily from the Quran and the Sunna--the sayings, practices, and teachings of the Prophet Mohammed. Precedents and analogy applied by Muslim scholars are used to address new issues. The consensus of the Muslim community also plays a role in defining this theological manual.


This is a pretty uniform definition of Shari'a.

Now let's look at Consensus:

This is a report from World Public opinion.org(PDF)
Public Opinion in the
Islamic World on Terrorism, al Qaeda, and US Policies February 25, 2009



8. Islamist Groups and Shari'a
Majorities say Islamist groups should be allowed to participate in the political process by
organizing political parties and running candidates in elections and reject the argument that
such groups should be excluded because they are not genuinely democratic. The Islamist goal
of giving Shari’a a larger role in Islamic society is viewed positively. Views are more mixed,
however, on whether people would like to see a greater role for Shari’a in their country, and
among those who do prefer a greater role views vary as to whether this greater role should
emphasize the enforcement traditions or social welfare.



This is the kind of thing that is worrisome. It is my opinion that folks that believe as you do are THE minority when it comes to this.



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:39 AM
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reply to post by projectvxn
 


While not trying to just pass out my identity, I disagree. I travel all over the U.S dealing with Muslims, speaking on panels, answering questions and such. That's not because of my level of knowledge but because of my stature in the American Muslim community. I think there a more people who share views with me than there are who share views with extremists. And the concentration varies by region. For example, the east coast is where you'll find more people who agree with Sharia without full knowledge of it's background. However on the west coast, the muslims I know out there all deal heavily with their sufi/spiritual side and have nothing but love for people everywhere. They're very open minded and love being American and living under the American justice system.



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:45 AM
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reply to post by My.mind.is.mine
 


I think there is a bit of misunderstanding here. I'm not speaking of American Muslims, of which I know many and have been kind enough to impart their knowledge of Islam to me without attempting to convert me. I am speaking strictly of Middle Eastern Islamic tradition and their counterpart that are, in fact, here in the US. Who do, in fact, intend to do the US harm.

I'm saying that the very basis of Islam for the fundamentalists is prevalent and dangerous. While Christians, and Jews have, by and large, given up much of their original bloodletting practices, those traditions are still alive in much of the Islamic world.

Poll after poll report after report from many nations(not just Western nations) depict a growing problem with Islamic Extremism especially among the youth.

The Muslims I often look to are those who decry such actions and beliefs. My argument with you is based solely on the academics and not your beliefs. As I hope you understand.

On a side note, also consider how many people we've had come through ATS with WIKI know how(
) pretending to be something they are not to fulfill some agenda. My apologies for my harshness.
edit on 6-3-2011 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:46 AM
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reply to post by projectvxn
 


Give it a break will you!

Jeezes

Just accept that we are all different and thats what makes life interesting

I hate to say this but when I look at how sick our Western society is today in 2011; makes me think that perhaps some aspects of Sharia Law would'nt be a bad thing to have in our judicial system thats already broken down.



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:48 AM
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reply to post by bluemirage5
 


I will not "give it a break".

ATS is for debate.

Grow up.



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:49 AM
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reply to post by projectvxn
 


I've had experiences with many muslims from other places in the middle east, southern asia, europe, and africa, and while I do agree that the bulk of extremism exists from within those places, the generalizing still isn't conducive to relations. It's a lot of muslims there who disagree with extremists, however they possibly have to fear for their lives so of course they're silent. America has been the catalyst for change in many different issues and I think on this issue, it is American Muslims who have to stand up and speak out, and maybe slap a couple of people if need be.



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:51 AM
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reply to post by My.mind.is.mine
 


So if i call you a liar - you'll call me a bigot.



the burden of proof is on you, i'm afraid.
edit on 6-3-2011 by PrimePorkchop because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:51 AM
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reply to post by MiTS1965
 


Oh, That just cracked me up, coffee all over my keyboard now LOL. Never a truer word spoken in jest. Peace star.



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:52 AM
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reply to post by My.mind.is.mine
 


The second the American Muslim community begins to slap the Wahabi's and other nut jobs into submission there will be a huge bloodletting. I understand the silence, but I want to SEE the courage of conviction.



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:53 AM
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reply to post by bluemirage5
 



I hate to say this but when I look at how sick our Western society is today in 2011; makes me think that perhaps some aspects of Sharia Law would'nt be a bad thing to have in our judicial system thats already broken down.




Sharia Law is better?
You apparently have NO IDEA what Sharia Law is about



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:54 AM
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reply to post by PrimePorkchop
 


I know exactly what Sharia Law is.....probably better than you!

I said SOME aspects of Sharia Law



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:56 AM
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reply to post by projectvxn
 


Wahhabi's and Sufi's have had this hate thing going on for hundreds of years, understandably as well. One day the light will shine though.



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:59 AM
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reply to post by My.mind.is.mine
 




One thing I am not clear on is the fighting between the sects(Of which there are many). While I have read much of the history regarding these issues....It is just aggravatingly convoluted.

Care to provide a clarification?
edit on 6-3-2011 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 08:59 AM
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reply to post by My.mind.is.mine
 





During that process of the splitting up of Islam, Islam was actually broken apart and became compartmentalized. Sufism is the inner realm of Islam which deals with the person having a personal relationship with God and yearning for him. When the system of worship was first revealed, this was just a normal part of it, but afterward, it was turned into a sect and the practitioners became "the sufi's". I've seen in the past couple of years more and more muslims begin to understand sufism for what it is and have started to implement it in their lives via meditations and such.



A most interesting post. I'm for anybody studying the deeper mystical paths of religion.



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 09:01 AM
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reply to post by My.mind.is.mine
 





If we come from the same "family" of religions, then obviously it's the SAME GOD.



Exactly, so why do we have religions tied to the same thing most of us believe? This "religion thing" really causes more hate and judgment of each other, just like the republican and democratic parties! We do more fighting among ourselves because of what we perceive is the right thing according to these labels. When religious leaders start judging people, when they protect their own criminal activity, when they spew hate, promote violence, and start involving themselves in the political arena, than that alone should be a RED FLAG that religions are really going against God's basic premise of "love one another."



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