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Can Stars be seen from the moon???

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posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 10:40 AM
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Im curious to why we can see stars poke through at twilight when the sky is a bluish color and cant see stars in the background in moon pic, i have posted a few to give you an idea...i dont believe that its cause the reflectivity from the surface is the reason for them.

thank you all and ill look forward to your opinions and views.












posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 10:43 AM
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reply to post by gmac10001
 


Yes, one can see stars on the moon.

It has to be night time though. The sun is awfully bright when it's out.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 10:50 AM
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There are no stars, it was just a black screen around the set. They were filming the Tonight Show and Let's Make A Deal behind those screens around the same time.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 10:56 AM
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reply to post by JibbyJedi
 


lol hahah touche...i actually saw a doc. showing that they black out the back ground and created a fake horizon to hide the huge structures that were discovered while up there and that they met an entity that told them to never come back..ill try and look it up.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 11:02 AM
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Originally posted by octotom
reply to post by gmac10001
 


Yes, one can see stars on the moon.

It has to be night time though. The sun is awfully bright when it's out.


I disagree. We can't see stars at daytime because of atmosphere not because of sun's brightness.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 11:16 AM
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These pics are taken in bright daylight. The aperture and exposure time of the camera must have been adjusted to this extremely bright light, no wonder there are no stars visible.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 11:18 AM
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In comes your resident photography expert. The sun was shining, and due to the conditions on the moon the camera would have raised the aperture to let less light in (Meaning this photo was probably shot at an F-11 or higher aperture, resulting in less light reaching the center). This would cause low light sources such as stars to be invisible to the camera and would show up as completely black due to the stars not projecting enough light to reach the sensor through such a small lens opening. I don't feel like checking the EXIF data but if one of you can access it you will see the F-stop at a high number and the shutter speed around 1/30-1/160, as well as a relatively low iso (200-600), all of these would cause a solid black sky but would result in a better picture for the objects of focus. I'm actually surprised to see nasa using the correct photography settings, as I doubt many astronauts are trained photographers. Hope that puts this one to rest for you. As for whether the photo is fake, I couldn't tell you, I can just tell you that the black sky does not mean a fake photo under these conditions.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 11:20 AM
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reply to post by gmac10001
 


Don't bother, it is silly:


...i actually saw a doc. showing that they black out the back ground and created a fake horizon to hide the huge structures ...


Your question about stars on photos, though....not understanding WHY people don't understand this!

Many just know nothing at all about photography, it seems. You can do this experiment yourself. go outside at night, here on Earth, where there is a bright light illuminating the area. (Just one, preferably, to simulate the Sun, when above the Lunar horizon, during the Lunar "day".

Set your camera exposure (**) for the light, as in take a picture of a subject...a person, or thing...that is lit up, and be sure to include a good chunk of the night sky in the background. (**)....if you are using an "Auto" setting, you should understand what the camera is "doing". It can change both aperture size (opening) and/or exposure interval (time). You may wish to use "manual" settings, to get to know better the different results.

THEN, look at your image results. No doubt, you will be using a digital camera, nowadays....whereas on Apollo it was film. But, the principals are the same, regardless.

Do yourself a favor, too, and look for some basic photography lessons or courses....or just info online, for free, if you don't want to pay anything. You can still learn a LOT for free.....



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 11:25 AM
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Set your camera to manual exposure and manual aperture, adjust it all so that you can take a good picture in bright sunlight.

And then wait until it is night. Use the very *same* settings and shoot a picture of the night sky (maybe even including the moon, just for fun) and post it here: It will be all black!
edit on 5-3-2011 by prof7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 11:32 AM
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I don't feel like checking the EXIF data


EXIF data did not exist when these pictures were made, not even digital cameras.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 11:39 AM
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reply to post by archasama
 


The atmosphere is always there!!! Day and night!! The reason we experience a 'blue sky' is due to Rayleigh scattering, longer wavelengths of the sun's light passing through the atmosphere giving a blue effect, so, in turn the sun can be classed as the cause of not seeing the stars by day even in your argument that it is the atmoshere in the way!!!!!!! By the way, it is the sun that masks the stars by day!!!



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 12:04 PM
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reply to post by chandlerbrujo
 


Yup. That's right. *Sun + Atmosphere = No Stars* I was referring to the fact that moon doesn't have an atmosphere. Atmosphere is only visible in daytime. Of course it does not disappear in night.

P.S. - Why are you using so many exclamation marks?



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 12:18 PM
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reply to post by KevinB
 


There is a very involved discussion on the topic of the cameras used on the Apollo missions, in another thread.

Film ASA / ISO speeds, aperture settings and shutter speeds, etc on the Hasselblads in particular.

(As mentioned....you are WAY too modern, with a mention of "EXIF data"!! Film...good old-fashioned negative film was used).

AS TO the Hassies....they had only a few aperture /shutter speed selections to choose from, to make it easier while wearing the bulky EVA suit gloves.

Also, a handy-dandy placard was on the camera, for reference:



More about the Apollo Hasselblads.....






edit on 5 March 2011 by weedwhacker because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 12:21 PM
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reply to post by archasama
 



I disagree. We can't see stars at daytime because of atmosphere not because of sun's brightness.

So, what about those little spots on the sky at night? Why can I see them? Is the atmosphere only present on the daytime side of the Earth?



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 12:35 PM
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reply to post by archasama
 



I was referring to the fact that moon doesn't have an atmosphere.

The moon actually does have an atmosphere. In comparison to Earth's atmosphere it is virtually a vacuum. Apparently, the moon has more of an atmosphere then Mercury!



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 12:55 PM
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Hahaha, I forgot this was pre-exif data lol. I have shot with hasselblad film cameras and while they have less aperture/shutter settings the reasoning I presented in my early post still applies. Light + Higher Aperture (smaller hole) = No stars at night. This is basic photography and applies to film and digital cameras. Most likely the person using the camera was well versed in photography and that is why the picture was taken correctly with a high aperture. Also my ISO comment still applies as the film was probable a "low speed" film, somewhere in the 200-600 range.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 01:13 PM
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reply to post by KevinB
 


Here, you can read all about the various ASA speeds of the film used on Apollo:

www.hq.nasa.gov...



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 01:18 PM
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We've gone through this so many times on the site I cant even recall all of them. They were in the moon at daytime. Daytime = no stars.



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