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Say 'thank you' to ESA

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posted on Jul, 18 2004 @ 06:42 PM
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Ariane 5 launches heavy load


18 July 2004
Early this morning (CEST), an Ariane 5G lifted off from Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. On board was the largest telecommunications satellite ever launched.

The satellite was successfully placed into geostationary orbit around 28 minutes after liftoff. At the time of its release, the Ariane-5 launcher was travelling at a speed of 8650 metres a second and had reached an altitude of around 1610 km.

At launch, the Anik F2 telecommunications satellite, to be operated by Canada-based Telesat, had a launch mass of 5950 kg. Now that it is in orbit, this heavyweight telecommunications satellite will provide high-speed Internet access and digital communications services across North America. Anik F2 carries 32 Ku-band transponders, 38 Ka-band transponders and 24 C-band transponders.

One of the beneficiaries will be the Canadian telemedicine project Telecare, a pilot project that received ESA funding under its Telecom Programme. This pilot project uses two-way satellite networks to enable nurses to ‘visit’ patients who live in remote areas

More cool and useful tech from europe! We know you appreciate us really.




posted on Jul, 18 2004 @ 07:51 PM
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I live in the US this does nothing for me don't know why I should thank them so i wont but nice satellite *mumbles another thing to make Europe seem important* just kidding



posted on Jul, 18 2004 @ 08:46 PM
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The Sattelite is owned by a Canadian company.



posted on Jul, 18 2004 @ 09:38 PM
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Did ESA do this for free? If so thanks are in order. But Im guessing they were payed a tidy little launch fee....



posted on Jul, 18 2004 @ 09:48 PM
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Hmm the satellite is owned by a Canadian company but they had it launched from Europe? Was it developed there as well? I guess U.S. is chargin to much for launches. We'd better shape up if we want business at NASA to pick up. After all its not there for just space exploration.


MBF

posted on Jul, 18 2004 @ 10:31 PM
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Originally posted by sminkeypinkey
Ariane 5 launches heavy load

The satellite was successfully placed into geostationary orbit around 28 minutes after liftoff. At the time of its release, the Ariane-5 launcher was travelling at a speed of 8650 metres a second and had reached an altitude of around 1610 km.


Geostationary orbit is a lot higher than 1610km, something like 35-36,000km. Going the speed that it was, it would have taken over an hour to reach geostationary orbit if it went straight up, but it takes a curved path therefore it will take a lot longer to reach geostationary orbit. It may have made it into orbit in 28 minutes.



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 12:01 AM
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They launched it from ESA's spaceport in French Guiana which is actually in South America and because this is a commercial sattelite the company definetly paid for the launch. The Sattelite was made by Boeing while the internal components I believe were produced by a couple of Canadian companies.



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 12:34 AM
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Damn!! Now they are out sourcing space launches.
I hope MacDonald’s has spots for all our rocket scientists that will be looking for work soon.
I’ll bet the service gets worse



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 05:48 AM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
I live in the US this does nothing for me don't know why I should thank them so i wont but nice satellite *mumbles another thing to make Europe seem important* just kidding



Did you miss the bit about......"this heavyweight telecommunications satellite will provide high-speed Internet access and digital communications services across North America".

I dunno, the things we olde worlders do for you lot (at a remarkably competitive price!) and not a gramme of gratitude.



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 05:49 AM
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Originally posted by Taeas
Damn!! Now they are out sourcing space launches.
I hope MacDonald’s has spots for all our rocket scientists that will be looking for work soon.
I’ll bet the service gets worse


.....but the small talk as you wait for your order will be an excellent antidote to all that 'dumbing down' crap that's going on, huh?!



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 07:02 AM
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NASA doesn't desperately need money once the space tourism industry starts NASA will be out front leading the pack and at 20 million a . for going to see space they will be filthy rich before they know it and I got a question can the US government tax US citizens for going into space?



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 09:57 AM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
NASA doesn't desperately need money once the space tourism industry starts NASA will be out front leading the pack and at 20 million a . for going to see space they will be filthy rich before they know it and I got a question can the US government tax US citizens for going into space?


Hmmm, getting rich on the rich and their 'need' to travel quickly and their desire to risk all by going into space, eh?

France and Britain thought that stuff about the rich with the Concorde, be warned. I doubt their appetite for the novelty of space too and I don't see any realistic scenario for your idea to work. Sorry.

Unless the USA is prepared to fund another few luxury versions of the space station (which they could/would not do alone on the 1st one) to act as space hotels how does this multi-million dollar stream happen? A few hops into space per year, hell, be generous and say per month!? That's not going to make a lot of $....and the capacity to do even a few per month would cost the kind of $ no-one is prepared to pay.

Considering private craft seems attractive right now what with the first private flight happening (although it has yet to be repeated to claim the prize) but can you imagine the cost of certifying that craft or similar to act as any kind of public transport?!

....or is that the kind of pinko government interference you get angry about!
lol. Yeah don't bother, maybe it'll crash onto you and yours in your house one day or just asphyxiate you or your relatives if you should be so 'lucky' to fly on it.


As for the tax question?

Of course, one way or another they'll get you and anyway you can't take it with you when you die.

It was afterall taxpayers who funded the whole learning and development of space flight, the infrastructures.....and who will no doubt be left to clear up any mess from the screw-ups and accidents, so, why not?



[edit on 19-7-2004 by sminkeypinkey]


E_T

posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 11:59 AM
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Originally posted by sminkeypinkey
Considering private craft seems attractive right now what with the first private flight happening...

It's sub-orbital flight which is magnitude cheaper and less complex than flying to orbit&staying there.



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 12:39 PM
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Yes like ET said low orbit flight is cheaper and safer than deep space also once the industry starts out and becomes practical the cost will go down dramatically and one day it will cost as much as you pay now to fly from one country to another.



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 12:45 PM
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Originally posted by E_T

Originally posted by sminkeypinkey
Considering private craft seems attractive right now what with the first private flight happening...

It's sub-orbital flight which is magnitude cheaper and less complex than flying to orbit&staying there.


- I don't doubt the theory but I am saying the practicalities of certification for passanger carrying make this unlikely in the extreme for the foreseeable future.



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 12:47 PM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
Yes like ET said low orbit flight is cheaper and safer than deep space also once the industry starts out and becomes practical the cost will go down dramatically and one day it will cost as much as you pay now to fly from one country to another.


- is your idea that NASA now start sub-orbital joy-rides for the rich to get rich?

You have still got to get over the hurdles of certification for passanger carrying.

I just don't see it as practical or happening for a long long time yet myself.



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