It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

New Supermoon may cause natural disasters in a couple of weeks time

page: 2
17
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 08:07 AM
link   
The trouble is, extreme weather events and tectonic activity occurs every day of every week of every year.

How then do you attribute any particular event to specific cause?




posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 08:11 AM
link   
1993 did have some extreme weather. As others have stated we had the blizzard in March and in East Tennessee we had tornadoes in February. And there was also flooding.....


The Great Flood of 1993 occurred in the American Midwest, along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers and their tributaries, from April to October 1993. The flood was among the most costly and devastating to ever occur in the United States, with $15 billion in damages.

Great Flood of 1993



posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 08:14 AM
link   

Originally posted by Bee2010
reply to post by Bee2010
 


Even if there are no natural disasters, perhaps it will have a stronger effect on us. A full moon is said to cause people to go a bit batty. The moon will be closer to the earth - surely the effect, if it does exist will then be stronger.


The moon is always full, its just the reflection of the sunlight that you see. How can people go batty because the moon is brighter? It is always a "Full Circle"...



posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 08:19 AM
link   
reply to post by Bee2010
 


The moon is closest to earth since 1993 in a fortnights time.


Not to be a thread buster, but, what happened in 1993? Any world killing event I missed?

Ok, I'm trying to make a joke here, and failing it seems, but really, what went on in 1993 and do we have any reason to think 'this time around' it will be any worse?

Or I guess I could just go and read the article?

S&F for putting up with me and since now that I read back Under Water posted the thought first!


peace
edit on 4-3-2011 by silo13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 08:24 AM
link   
I know the farmers calender are predicting a snow storm between the 15th and 20th March in the Northern part of the States.
Only thing I can think of is the tides might be little higer, but if you think about it, it's already almost in that position, it's not like the moon is going to move thousands of miles closer in one night, it's gradual and it's been getting closer for years...



posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 08:31 AM
link   
I too, remember that blizzard of '93. I lived in central NY at the time. Roads were closed for close to a solid week. As were all schools and most Gov't offices. The county I lived in, called a State of Emergency for 5 days. I remember 8-12 foot snowdrifts after the storm. The only time in my life that I remember the need to open the back door and shovel snow just to open it. Snow piled to the peak of the roof, was pretty epic to experience.

And now this year.....

Since '93, this region hasn't had much snow each winter at all. Maybe an average of 12 inches at the most on the ground. But the winter of 2011 has seen some major snowfall here. 30 inches in a few days time is actually a lot for this area in such a short time. And is the most at one time since the blizzard of '93.

Areas just less than an hour north of me, have experienced severe ice jams in the rivers. Most jams over 2 miles long and over 8 foot thick. Some rivers had minor flooding from these jams. One town even needed to blast one huge ice jam with dynamite, twice. We've also had many record low temperatures from November to February. Many days and nights, temps dipping to -30F.

The region I refer to, is the Twin Tiers of New York and Pennsylvania. Which is located south of NY's Finger Lakes Region.

In summary, this winter has been the worst winter for this region, since 1993.
edit on 3/4/2011 by MadDogtheHunter because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 09:29 AM
link   
reply to post by silo13
 


Yes. The worst floods in the history of the nation. It lasted through the entire summer. Movies were made about it. Levees broke, and backup levees broke. Whole towns were inundated.

Now, I personally don't remember the Eastern Blizzard, but it sounds pretty bad. I was directly affected by the floods though, and they were beyond comprehension. Whole communities lost everything. It was probably the worst thing to hit the US up to that point. Katrina might rival it, but just barely.

NY Times

FEMA documentary made 10 years later

Wiki Page




posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 06:43 PM
link   
reply to post by jrmcleod
 


It may sound odd but trust me, people are definitely stranger during a full moon. Just ask any cop, it is always busier during full moon. I don't know the science behind it but i know its the truth from my own observations.



posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 07:47 PM
link   

Originally posted by OptimisticPessimist
reply to post by kennyb72
 


The last impression I was under, was that the Moon was moving away from the Earth...
I'm confuddled now!




The Moon is currently moving away from the Earth at the very slow rate of 3.8 cm per year. It has been moving away from the Earth ever since its formation more than 4 billion years ago.

Source

The reason the Moon's orbital distance from Earth is gradually increasing is due to the influence of the tides. Tides on Earth are created by the gravitational influence of both the Moon and the Sun that tug on the planet and cause it to bulge outward slightly at the equator. The majority of this equatorial bulging is actually due to the rotation of the Earth about its axis. This rotation raises the equator about 23 kilometers, or 0.4% of the Earth's radius, higher than it would be if the Earth did not rotate. The planet's shape is further deformed by the gravitational pull of the Moon. While the solid surface of the Earth is distorted by only a few centimeters, the primary effect is on the oceans that rise by a few meters.

Source





posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 08:00 PM
link   
Great American Flood 1993

Originally posted by Under Water
So the last time this happened was in '93. Any huge disasters in '93 that anyone can remember? Maybe if something is already on the verge of going off, this will be enough to tip it over the edge? Interesting stuff. We already know the effect the moon has on our planet and on us. The closer or further away it is, the more or less it will effect us, right? Seems logical. Just how much closer will it be than usual? Are we talking a big difference, or tiny? Hmm,. I do know i'll be outside shooting pics of it, that's for sure!


1993 Massive flooding of the Mississippi River.
April - October



posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 08:08 PM
link   
The moon's average orbit is about 382,000 km. It ranges from 363,000 km to 406,000 km. The moon does not have a circular orbit, more of an eclipse (oval). Sometimes everything lines up and the moon is closer than usual. The current close orbit is about 356,000 km. The usual changes in orbital distance is +/- 5 %. This orbit is about 7.5 %. Since magnetic and gravity fields act at the square root of distance, I doubt a change of 30,000 out of 384,000 would much of an effect.
edit on 4-3-2011 by noj42 because: woyld to would, hitting return before final check



posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 08:10 PM
link   
reply to post by getreadyalready
 

The flooding of 1993 had its roots in the wet weather which began in the fall 1992 and carried through that winter and into spring.

Though, as pointed out earlier in the thread, a perigeal full Moon does produce higher than average tides there isn't much reason to expect much else.

edit on 3/4/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 08:54 PM
link   
The Scotts Mills earthquake was March 25, 1993.
en.wikipedia.org...

Also Helmut Tributsch has an interesting theory on the moon and earthquakes.

When the snakes awake

Good overview of it here 1/3 of the way down the page.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 06:19 AM
link   

Originally posted by noj42
The moon's average orbit is about 382,000 km. It ranges from 363,000 km to 406,000 km. The moon does not have a circular orbit, more of an eclipse (oval). Sometimes everything lines up and the moon is closer than usual. The current close orbit is about 356,000 km. The usual changes in orbital distance is +/- 5 %. This orbit is about 7.5 %. Since magnetic and gravity fields act at the square root of distance, I doubt a change of 30,000 out of 384,000 would much of an effect.



Quite correct...
which lets us reason that this Lunar perigee is very incremental (especially month-by-month for a
pereiod of ~18 years)

the Moon has been increasing Its' minute gravitational pull each month as it orbits closer to Earth.

the other factors involving the Earth's crust... things like Plate movement & ocean floor spreading
are in the same magnitude of effect on our daily lives.
the Earth changes going on right now are because of the cycle of the inner core
which affects the production on Mantle Plumes in new locations below ground...

the Moons proximity & minute increase in gravity is an almost neglegable force on the Crust or Continents,
... i'm not saying 0%... but perhaps close to 1%...
the plate tectonics and the inner core rate of spin is the greater dynamic at play
conderning the earthquakes and magnetic pole wanderings & anomalies...

Don't blame it on the Moon.... If that were true, then the recedeing moon orbit could be rationalized
as a time when earthquakes and such diminish in strength & frequency as the Earth gets less
gravitational stress as the Moon retreats those same 30k kilometers, over the next 18 years of
Its orbit pattern/cycle



related info:
highered.mcgraw-hill.com...#


? aren't the ultra high tides that occur called Spring Tides ? Proxigean

edit on 5-3-2011 by St Udio because: spring tide & link


www.enchantedlearning.com...
edit on 5-3-2011 by St Udio because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 08:42 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


Ya, I agree. I was just pointing out the floods for those that thought nothing significant happened that year. I don't think it was related to the moon, since it really lasted almost a year! As you pointed out, it began in the end of 92, and than the rains from spring through fall of 93 just topped it off. I don't think the moon produces rain. It does produce crazies though! Ask any cop or ER tech, LOL!



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 11:43 AM
link   
all I can see coming from this is definately higher tides , perhaps some increase seisemec activity and weather paterns . I`'m pretty sure I`ll still have to show up at work on 20th. Unless I call in sick.



posted on Mar, 9 2011 @ 07:24 AM
link   

Originally posted by restless genius
Interesting OP, but does anyone else remember this, it was alot later than 1993 maybe 1999 or 2000 I remember seeing the moon in the sky and it was massive and red and what a sight that was have only ever seen that once, someone please tell me they remember this.

I remember. I was doing my evening paper route when the clouds parted revealing a huge red monster of a moon. I rushed home thinking the world was gonna end. My mother calmed my nerves saying the moon just looked bigger because it was low over the horizon. Still, I've never seen it like that again.


Originally posted by 3finjo
reply to post by jrmcleod
 


It may sound odd but trust me, people are definitely stranger during a full moon. Just ask any cop, it is always busier during full moon. I don't know the science behind it but i know its the truth from my own observations.
Indeed, anecdotal evidence abounds. My mother told me once how she hated working the night shift in the retirement home during full moon. The senior citizens would become very restless, repeatedly getting out of bed, wandering around the hallways, falling, demanding the meds they already had, constantly pressing their 'I need attention'-buttons. A day or so later, and all would return to normal.



posted on Mar, 9 2011 @ 02:43 PM
link   
first of all, my dear friends, lest put this "moon issue" in perspective.

1-The moon affects the tides FACT source






2-The percentage of water in our bodies can be from 55% to 75% that means from half to more than half

source 1

source 2

3- Blood is composed of water as well, almost 92% according to this source


Now adding 1+1 , and understanding that the nature of reality seems to be a fractal in reiterating scales, according to this and this and this too


The moon affects us, just as it affects the earth, I mean it has the power thousands of miles away to exert some pull and change the general shape of the planet, imagine what it does to us that are more than half of water.
If you reason that the center of the earth nullifies this outer force, then we are not taking into account that if the moon changes the earth, by the fractal definition, it also affects us.
Forces pull and tug, yet we decide to ignore what we have right in our noses.

Many can testify the strangeness of human behavior on a full moon, ask any cops, emergency ward interns, firemen, and general service to public folk if they have seen something or felt anything odd during those times.

Fact is not many even pay attention to that, we have learned to ignore everything but our petty lives!
I´ll be camping that day, so I can safely turn into a werewolf, and my running naked through the wilderness wont frighten anybody!




edit on 9-3-2011 by TheOneEyedProphet because: numbers



posted on Mar, 9 2011 @ 02:49 PM
link   

Originally posted by OneisOne
1993 did have some extreme weather.


Yes, but so has every other year. That's the point.



posted on Mar, 9 2011 @ 02:56 PM
link   
reply to post by TheOneEyedProphet
 

Tides are not the direct result of the force of gravity. They are the result of the difference in the force over distance. Look at the picture you posted. Notice how there is a high tide on the opposite side of the Earth from the Moon? How do you suppose that happens?

It is because the force of gravity exerted on the "far side" of Earth is less than that exerted on the "near side". There is a noticeable difference over the 8,000 miles from one side of Earth to the other. There is no noticeable difference between the head and feet of a human. Human bodies are not affected by tidal effects.

edit on 3/9/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
17
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join