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Weird things shooting at our sun? Sorry can´t describe it better you have to look for yourself plea

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posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 05:08 PM
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www.youtube.com...

I really don´t know what to say. Keep your eyes on the middle right corner. It looks like some living organism is heading towards our sun. The objects seem to be twisted like a corkscrew.

Any ideas?
edit on 3-3-2011 by Perfectenemy because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 05:14 PM
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Hmm...I see a bunch of space rocks interacting with the suns hot atmosphere.

Maybe I'm wrong?

SM



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 05:45 PM
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reply to post by Perfectenemy
 


The Sun has 98% of the total mass of the solar system.

That is why the planets orbit it but not each other.

As such, it acts like a big gravitational vacuum cleaner, sucking up anything within its gravitational reach that is not in a stable orbit. Things like comets, meteors & stuff.

Because things falling in to the Sun come from very far away, they are ice cold. Frozen. Sometimes when they melt, they do so unevenly and this can cause them to break up or even to appear to wobble as they go.

If a falling object was light coloured on one side (visible against the background of space) and dark on the other (invisible against the background of space) and was spinning, we could well interpret it as "spiralling" as it fell, and leaving a trail of broken off bits could make it look as if the object was an elongated spiral.



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 06:02 PM
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I just think it's odd that the trajectory of both (quite large) objects was virtually if not exactly identical - and with identical "spin" signs.

Sure, it may be just random debris...but it looks mighty fishy having that concordance.



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 06:47 PM
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Originally posted by Perfectenemy
www.youtube.com...

I really don´t know what to say. Keep your eyes on the middle right corner. It looks like some living organism is heading towards our sun. The objects seem to be twisted like a corkscrew.

Any ideas?
edit on 3-3-2011 by Perfectenemy because: (no reason given)


Conventional comet theory--of which I'm not entirely in agreement with--has a nice explanation. We know what comets are, chunks of asteroid-like bodies that also emit gases that provide their glorious comas and tails. Most that we see are in suitable orbits that take them around the sun and back out into deep space or anyway, away from that approach.

If a body does not have enough of an angle of attack to have an orbit, stable or unstable, it will fall into the sun. If not the first time it falls into the inner system , then eventually. Physics demands it.

the "corkscrew" appearance can come from a comet that is falling into the sun and the tail displays a typical comet tail as the body heats up nearing the furnace. Comets are anything but ball-shaped. they usually rotate, sometimes on more than two axis. This one is evidently tumbling and we can surmise that since a second body follows the first that there originally was only one body. It split, which comets are seen to do, and that would allow for some portion of both bodies to have exhausted some of its volitile substances and/or perhaps exposed new material to boil off as the pieces rotated falling into their doom.



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 06:48 PM
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The "Weird things shooting at our sun" are more than likely comet fragments belonging to the Kreutz Sungrazer family of comets


Source: SOHO


SOHO image of two Kreutz comets on their way towards the sun



The reason they appear to "wiggle" is most likely an imaging artifact that is due to pixelation, which makes straight things look wavy or jagged, especially when you start to zoom in.


Source: betterexplained.com
edit on 3-3-2011 by C.H.U.D. because: fixed image desplay problem



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