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TERRORISM: Jordanian Attempts to Get U.S. Pilot License, Arrested

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posted on Jul, 18 2004 @ 04:30 PM
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This is a story that may point out the dangers of sleeper agents and continuing lax government officials. The Jordanian man in question Sami Abuhamatto applied for a pilots certificate in May 2002 and recieved approval from the FAA a week later.

The only reason authorities figured out he lied about his citizenship was the fact that he was caught trying to set up a bogus marriage to gain residency status much later.

In Mr. Abuhamatto's case no terrorism ties are suspected at this time, his case however points to a glaring and unforgivable lapse in security by the FAA, an agency who should be extremely vigilant after the 9/11 attacks used pilots trained at several private flight traing centers located in the U.S.
 



ap.tbo.com
BROOKFIELD, Ill. (AP) - A Jordanian man living in the United States illegally has been charged with lying about his immigration status to obtain a pilot's license.

Abuhamatto's six-month visitors visa expired in 1996, according to court documents. He applied for the pilot's license in May 2002, claiming he was a U.S. citizen born in Brookfield, the Chicago suburb where he lives, the documents show.

Authorities said they learned of the incident after Abuhamatto arranged a bogus marriage late last year in an effort to gain resident alien status.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


I have to wonder how many Sami Abuhamatto's are out there training to be pilots that have motives other than Sami's desire to stay in the U.S.

Once again through the inaction of government officials charged with checking these things out - we the public have to ask open ended questions about our security.




posted on Jul, 18 2004 @ 05:23 PM
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So the moral of the story is, if you've got something to hide, then stay single after you get your pilot's license. A better background check is run by a small-town clerk than by the FAA?

I may be misinterpreting this, but that's the way it seems to be to me, from the facts presented. Unless there was something funny about the marriage, like a fictional spouse?

And this guy's visa expired in 1996, and he applied for the pilot's license in 2002. Where was he is the six years in between?

Who's watching the back door?




posted on Jul, 18 2004 @ 05:34 PM
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jsobecky, I think you called it just right, yup the county court or whatever local agency heck I'll even go so far as to say INS got this detail before the FAA.

This just goes to show what we are up against. Our own governments lack of care or effort. When people say another attack is coming believe it by this example.



posted on Jul, 18 2004 @ 06:58 PM
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I hate saying it and will probably get flamed but after many many years working with GS (government) workers, I am convinced they are somewhat lazy, riding the job to retirement, and very complacent. My personal experience only - I am sure there are many good workers out there. But many are still part of the problem. Think of the bureacratic bean counters that stifle much of the information coming through the chain of command.



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 01:04 AM
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Anyone else here think it would be pointlessly stupid for a soon-to-be terrorist to get a Pilot's License? I mean, honestly, they know how to fly, they should just fail their exam and act all sad, then leave. They could still do their required work - why the hell would they let the FAA do a background check?

If a terrorist was actually stupid enough to go through the certification process and the US government was actually stupid enough to let them breeze through these days, then, well, no, no one would ever deserve anything like that, but it would be shocking. The terrorists would have let slip a major flaw, and the US would have taken no advantage..

Terrible.



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 04:00 AM
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One thing should be considered as well - if you manage to get a flight license in the US it is a "good-job-guarantee" for African and some middle-east countries.
I remember a magazine on some info channel reporting about africans who did their license in the USA to become pilot in their home countries.

But okay, this one seems to be quite stupid


The 6 years are easy to explain. After 9/11 governments in western countries started this big data-mining and PR-campaign "We know everything about everybody so don't even try it again"-campaign. So if any terrorist was trying to get into the USA after 9/11 he was under constant monitoring.
What they missed to say is that everybody who entered the country before this whole process was somehow on a lost list.

And that's where we have the danger. No way by sleepers, that came after 9/11 - more by those who have been in the USA before that date and aren't covered by the latest data mining.



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 08:08 AM
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I'm a private pilot and would like to present the 'other side' of this issue. My flight instructor was Lebanese. He left home in his teens and worked extremely hard to learn English, put himself through secondary school in Europe and college in the US. He worked to get all of his pilot ratings. His goal since childhood had been to be an airline pilot (despite his family's wish that he follow his father's path into medicine). He was/is an exceptional instructor and pilot.

Shortly after I completed my instrument training with him he found a job flying for a small regional carrier. The carrier went though significant pains to get the necessary documentation to allow him to fly for them (we was not a US citizen at the time). About a year later the events of 9/11 changed everything. He had returned for a brief visit to see his family and was not allowed back into the US for almost a year --- despite tyhe fact that he had a job here. When he finally was allowed back he has suffered a withering string of 'paper chases'.

Foreigners will always seek to get their flight training in the US. Our flight schools are the best and most affordable in the world. If your intent is to get a job with a commercial carrier you almost HAVE to get your trining in the US.

Just another point of view --- it ain't all good.



posted on Aug, 27 2004 @ 01:47 AM
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Sami was my flight inst. I flew with him for almost 3 years and he was an awesome flight inst and and awesome friend. I can't believe this is happening and now I have to wonder what the FAA is going to do with my flight time because now I would guess that all his credentials are void. Either way, I wish the best for him and his family who are also very nice people.



posted on Aug, 27 2004 @ 02:39 AM
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Originally posted by WRBlueMeanie
Sami was my flight inst. I flew with him for almost 3 years and he was an awesome flight inst and and awesome friend. I can't believe this is happening and now I have to wonder what the FAA is going to do with my flight time because now I would guess that all his credentials are void. Either way, I wish the best for him and his family who are also very nice people.


You personally know him? Hmmmmm....



posted on Aug, 27 2004 @ 09:18 AM
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Originally posted by TACHYON

Originally posted by WRBlueMeanie
Sami was my flight inst. I flew with him for almost 3 years and he was an awesome flight inst and and awesome friend. I can't believe this is happening and now I have to wonder what the FAA is going to do with my flight time because now I would guess that all his credentials are void. Either way, I wish the best for him and his family who are also very nice people.


You personally know him? Hmmmmm....


Someone arrest that man! Call John Ashcroft!!




(just kidding!)



posted on Aug, 28 2004 @ 01:27 AM
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Yeah, I personally know him. He's been one of my best friends for the last 3 years. It really sucks now because obviously I can't get ahold of him and he'll most likely be deported and I'll never get to say goodbye. He's taught me all I know about flying and I wouldn't want to fly with any other instructor than him. But what are you gonna do, he was wrong and now he has to face the consequences.



posted on Aug, 28 2004 @ 07:25 PM
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Originally posted by WRBlueMeanie
Sami was my flight inst. I flew with him for almost 3 years and he was an awesome flight inst and and awesome friend. I can't believe this is happening and now I have to wonder what the FAA is going to do with my flight time because now I would guess that all his credentials are void. Either way, I wish the best for him and his family who are also very nice people.


The long arm of ATS reaches everywhere. God I love it.



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