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Federal researchers declare eastern cougar extinct

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posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 08:42 PM
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The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Wednesday declared the eastern cougar to be extinct, confirming a widely held belief among wildlife biologists that native populations of the big cat were wiped out by man a century ago.



After a lengthy review, federal officials concluded there are no breeding populations of cougars — also known as pumas, panthers, mountain lions and catamounts — in the eastern United States. Researchers believe the eastern cougar subspecies has probably been extinct since the 1930s.



Wednesday's declaration paves the way for the eastern cougar to be removed from the endangered species list, where it was placed in 1973. The agency's decision to declare the eastern cougar extinct does not affect the status of the Florida panther, another endangered wildcat.


I think this species of cougar is almost the same as the ones from the west. The article says that some of the ones from the west are moving into eastern areas, so there might be a chance there will be a growing number of cougars back in the east. There are still some of these cougars in the zoo, but none in the wild, according to the article.

From the article, the last known one was believed to be killed in 1938. Im not sure what led this certain kind of cougar to be extinct. Maybe industrialization of some of the east? Maybe that forced its habitat to shrink? Maybe pollution?




posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 08:49 PM
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Lol... I never trust or take seriously anything a Federal agent has to say.

You should take a peek at the cryptozoology section. There are many recent sightings of black panthers in Eastern US, which is just a variation of the cougar. Making wide assumptions like this is totally unreasonable. Getting out in the untamed hills at night isn't something fish and game wardens particularly excel at.
edit on 2-3-2011 by Mayura because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 08:53 PM
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Industrialization in the Appalachians is a major factor in reducing the mountain lion populations here. However, to say that the species is entirely extinct is disturbing, because I know for a fact that there are a few cats still roaming the hills through West Virginia, and probably Kentucky.

The problem is taking them off of the endangered species list. Why? Well, what type of penalty is there, legally, for killing an animal of an extinct species? I would doubt there is any. *I think* this is to allow any remaining cats that are still here to be eliminated by the DNR, possibly to rid any potential threat they may cause to local deer population or livestock. Of course they can't kill the cat legally on an endangered species list, they would have to allow it safe habitat if it lived in an uninhabited area, ergo take the cat off the list.



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 09:13 PM
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Originally posted by buni11687
Article


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Wednesday declared the eastern cougar to be extinct, confirming a widely held belief among wildlife biologists that native populations of the big cat were wiped out by man a century ago.



After a lengthy review, federal officials concluded there are no breeding populations of cougars — also known as pumas, panthers, mountain lions and catamounts — in the eastern United States. Researchers believe the eastern cougar subspecies has probably been extinct since the 1930s.



Wednesday's declaration paves the way for the eastern cougar to be removed from the endangered species list, where it was placed in 1973. The agency's decision to declare the eastern cougar extinct does not affect the status of the Florida panther, another endangered wildcat.


I think this species of cougar is almost the same as the ones from the west. The article says that some of the ones from the west are moving into eastern areas, so there might be a chance there will be a growing number of cougars back in the east. There are still some of these cougars in the zoo, but none in the wild, according to the article.

From the article, the last known one was believed to be killed in 1938. Im not sure what led this certain kind of cougar to be extinct. Maybe industrialization of some of the east? Maybe that forced its habitat to shrink? Maybe pollution?



While I do agree that Mountain Lion populations are very low but to claim them as extinct is just a bunch of BS, last year I saw 2 different adult mountain lions roaming a state park "Chapin Forest", in Kirtland, Ohio one was a large male and the other sighting was about 4 weeks after i saw the male near the same area I saw a pregnant female that must've been close to giving birth since its milk sacks were almost fully developed. I have also heard from some people that live in same town spotting them near dumpsters and rumaging through garbage cans early in the morning. Plus plenty of water, deer and coyote's to sustain a decent size population. Whatever is left of them we need to leave them alone and just admire the awesome power and beauty that they are.



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 11:23 PM
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I don't know about you but, I was hit up by an older middle aged woman not to long ago.... I beg the differ


On a serious note, I'm not surprised, it wont be long before more species bite the dust, starting with amphibians. then up the ladder



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 12:58 AM
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In NW Oh/SE Mi there have been several sightings over the years. I had one of my own. I was just getting my dogs in from out back, but one was lagging behind. I walked out back and grabbed his collar and started walking back to the house. Just then I heard the unmistakable sound of an animal being killed and the growl/cry of a very large cat. I yanked
my dog back to the house asap and stepped out ( not too far!) to see if I could see or hear anything more. I told my husband and my neighbor what I heard and that I was positive that it was a very large cat. They both laughed at me. Less than 2 weeks later, two cougars, a momma and a baby were spotted about 1 mile from me. If I recall, the person was able to video tape them. I think this was around 2004.
Oh and btw- I called Michigan DNR and they told me it couldn't have been a cougar.
edit on 3-3-2011 by virraszto because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 01:52 AM
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Yes, there are still small populations of South American and/or (western) cougars in the east. The idea here is that the Eastern Cougar subspecies has gone extinct in the wild. Just because other cougar subspecies are still spotted in small numbers doesn't change the notion presented in the article.
edit on 3/3/11 by redmage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 12:05 PM
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Maybe it'll be one of those animals that makes an appearance in 10 years after hiding out and waiting for humanity to get its act together.



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 12:06 PM
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reply to post by buni11687
 


What is the difference between the "Eastern Cougar/Panther" and the "Florida Cougar/Panther"???? Because we are on the East Coast, and we have plenty. Are they different species?


Wednesday's declaration paves the way for the eastern cougar to be removed from the endangered species list, where it was placed in 1973. The agency's decision to declare the eastern cougar extinct does not affect the status of the Florida panther, another endangered wildcat.


Nevermind, I read the article now.
edit on 3-3-2011 by getreadyalready because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 12:44 PM
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This is pretty much a semantic lullaby for a species that has been long extirpated from it's former range. Why they didn't declare them extinct long ago is beyond me. Despite sporadic sightings in the east there is no endemic population large enough to breed. What people are seeing are probably cougars released into the wild by would-be "pet owners" who realized that kitty was getting too big to handle.



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