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Mystery Meat: Authorities Find Chimpanzee Meat in Britain

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posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 02:52 PM
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Mystery Meat: Authorities Find Chimpanzee Meat on Britain


newsfeed.time.com< br />

Trading authorities in the United Kingdom were testing samples of meat thought to be seized from illegal vendors when they discovered that the unidentified meat was actually that of chimpanzees.
(visit the link for the full news article)


edit on 2-3-2011 by DaddyBare because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 02:52 PM
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Seems the black market in ...so called... exocit foods... is a huge business in the EU...

the story goes on to say how 270 tons of the stuff are passing through one airport in Paris alone.



According to the Daily Mail, Adina Farmaner, Executive Director of the Jane Goodall Institute UK, reports that ‘The bushmeat trade is a huge problem in certain parts of Africa and is one of the main reasons the population in the wild has been reduced from approximately one million about 50 years ago, to just a few hundred thousand today."


newsfeed.time.com< br /> (visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 03:03 PM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 


Very interesting find S&F. I had never heard of bushmeat until my girlfriend recently told me about it. This doesn't really suprise me, as people enjoy trying different and odd cuisines. People eat squirle, turtle, frog, snake, shark and other strange animals so why not chimps? Being on the indangered species list only raises the price tag on the dish.



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 03:14 PM
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Considering the range and capabilities of well-established chef's one has to wonder why anyone would seek out this kind of cuisine.

Knowing that it has to have come from some shady unregulated source would be enough to keep me away, no matter how 'rich' my tastes might become (is that event he right word for the liking of this "bushmeat"?)



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 03:15 PM
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reply to post by I B Dazzlin
 


You shouldn't eat chimps because they could give you AIDS.

Nah, but seriously you shouldn't eat them because they are 99% human. That basically makes you a cannibal.. Hannibal Lector. :-p



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 03:16 PM
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Makes a change from the usual sources of mystery meat in the UK, however I can't imagine Chimpanzee meat being very cheap even on the black market. I wonder which restaurants this was heading for hmmm.



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 03:19 PM
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Nothing like eating something that your related to.... Will they be selling cousins and uncles next?



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 03:20 PM
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If I am not mistaken bush meat can be exceptionally dangerous to handle as primates and humans share lack of immunity to several very dangerous diseases. If I have time I'll try to source it later but I can't imagine risking something like HIV or ebola just for a food "adventure".

~Heff



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 03:21 PM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 





Seems the black market in ...so called... exocit foods... is a huge business in the EU...

the story goes on to say how 270 tons of the stuff are passing through one airport in Paris alone.


I am not surprised.

the UK pretty much wiped out their own farming so you have a big import business. This makes it much easier to slip in "EXOTIC" foods.



January 8 2008 ~ "Who will rid us of this pestilent farming?"

Defra has dropped the word 'farming' from its title. The Telegraph today reveals that
"Defra and the Treasury's joint vision document of 2006 presented to the EU argued that supports for farming should be completely abandoned.." and the article reinforces the conviction in many minds that for the government, and for the Treasury in particular, farming is a drain on the country's finances and we are in a "post agricultural era". We can only repeat what we have already said today: at a time when oil industry executives themselves are admitting it isn't going to be easy to meet future world oil demand, and the globalised system that brings in cheap food is increasingly unsustainable, the values of local food production and of self sufficiency need urgently to be reconsidered. We need good farmers more than ever.



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 03:22 PM
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They have to do something with their bodies as they take over all of their natural environments...

This is news I am so very sorry to hear, from what I know of Brits this is going to piss off many many people and they will not tolerate this kind of animal cruelty and cannibalistic cuisine.

Keep us informed of the outcome please.



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 03:34 PM
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How about gorilla meat in NYC?

Nat Geo

Here is another:

We hear stories like that of the woman who faced a New York City judge last December for having smuggled dozens of monkey and baboon limbs and torsos into the United States from Guinea, and we’d like to think we know better. We’d like to think we’ve outgrown everything that hunting, killing and eating wild animals entails. Our ancestors did that, and through our modern eyes it seems primitive, speciesist and gross — and we’re ashamed.


Source



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 03:37 PM
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So while Jr. Detective at the airport boarding ramp feels Granny's panties for security, a containerload of bioweaponized monkey meat rolls right on by?

I never did trust bangers...



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 03:40 PM
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I wonder if it tastes like chicken?
But after seeing the brain eaters
in Faces of Death, I wondered when
they would work their way down & not
waste the rest.
edit on 2-3-2011 by don rumsfeld because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 03:44 PM
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That is absolutely disgusting! I think I just threw up in my mouth a little bit.




posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by tooo many pills
 


If monkeys taste this good im off to buy some fava beans and chianti.



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 04:31 PM
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edit on 2-3-2011 by Tamahu because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 05:16 PM
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I find this absolutely awful. Its not turning up the nose at things that aren't normally eaten by a Brit. I don't judge what other people like to eat and enjoy trying different foods, but a Chimp is too close to man and I agree with the writer above that this is virtual cannabilism. I also wouldn't judge and can understand cannabilism when people are faced with starvation.

As chimps are endangered I hope they catch both the people who sent the meat and the people to whom it was sent because we are not starving in this country and there is no excuse for this whatsoever. Don't know if the senders were starving, but if they were they wouldn't have sent it in the first place, they would have eaten it themselves.



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 05:35 PM
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reply to post by Chakotay
 


Yeah while TSA does Grope-N-Fly on every American, The USDA has a total of 17 Plant Inspection Stations in the United States for inspecting incoming plant material. The FDA has less than two inspectors per seaport.


The New York Times article “The Safety Gap” written by Gardiner Harris, 11/2/2008

"This year, 18.2 million shipments of food, devices, cosmetics and drugs are expected to enter more than 300 U.S. ports; the FDA. had 454 investigators in 2007 — one and a half per port — to scrutinize them.."

“China’s leap to one of the biggest suppliers of pharmaceutical ingredients in the world over the last decade [note the date], Generic drug makers in the United States, where price competition is fierce, were the first to seek cheaper drug ingredients...Over the past six years, the F.D.A. has managed to inspect annually an average of just 15 of the 714 Chinese drug plants that export to the United States. At its present pace, the FDA. would need more than 50 years to visit all Chinese plants. By contrast, the FDA. inspects domestic drug plants every 2.7 years ”
ltcadmin.org...



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 05:55 PM
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reply to post by I B Dazzlin
 


Too close to cannibalism for my taste. I would just not want to do it unless there were absolutely no other choice besides actual cannibalism.



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 06:05 PM
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bushwarriors.wordpress.com...’s-also-disease/
Some disturbing Images...........

Bottom line is that eating Bush meat Destroys and reduces Primate numbers.......
Eating bushmeat significantly increases the chances of Cross Species Infections and Viruses developing and gaining a foothold in another species...... that US by the way....


Text from the article / link above.....

The Dangers of the Bushmeat Trade: Beyond Extinction, There’s Also Disease
Trade in bushmeat is a growing industry, and is spreading across the globe. Found in alarming amounts at international airports and even local markets in the U.S., it is a demand stemming from the protein deficient, fine dining connoisseurs, and immigrants who want to remember their homelands. While some may find it satisfying, many find it a serious threat to the existence of both wildlife and humanity. Diseases exchanged between humans and wild animals are some of the most dangerous, and are often hard to control.

Bushmeat monkeys in market (photo credit: Dawn Starin)

“I eat monkey whenever I can,” says Angela, who is, ironically, a health worker at one of the main hospitals in the Guinean capital of Bissau. “Often I go with my son and we pay 2000 CFA [the equivalent of USD $4.12] for four or five pieces of monkey and a loaf of bread. I prefer mona monkey but I’ll eat anything on offer unless I’m pregnant. Pregnant women can’t eat monkey because they will end up having kids who act like monkeys and that’s a problem.”

Angela represents just one of many levels of the bushmeat trade. Many in central Africa, and elsewhere in the world, rely on bushmeat as a protein source in the absence or failure of livestock and crops. Trade in this form is considered “subsistence”, where as fine dining has fueled an even riskier commercial demand. Both subsistence and commercial trade in bushmeat pose serious health risks and are a grave threat to biodiversity.


Disease outbreaks in villages located in seemingly impenetrable forested areas are not uncommon. The culprit most often being transmission from wild animals, and usually from consumption. The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has seen a recent surge in monkeypox, which kills roughly ten percent of those infected, has virologists concerned that the virus may begin to transmitted from human to human. The disease is initially transmitted from exposure to wild animals, usually primates and frequently through consumption. However, given time in a human host, a virus can potentially mutate into a form transmissible from human to human. This is the part that concerns the experts.


“Those variants better at spreading will win out over time. This is the process that adapts the virus to humans,” says evolutionary biologist Paul Ewald of the University of Louisville. He explains that once a germ has established even a small foothold within a new host species, it will only improve in its ability to spread. Ewald adds that this process can happen quite rapidly, even within a matter of a few months.




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