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What's inside Tycho Crater?

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posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 04:46 AM
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In September 1996, during a total eclipse, the MSX satellite shooted this infraed image of the Moon completely immersed in the Earth's shadow. The bright spots correspond to the warm areas on the lunar surface and dark areas are cooler. The brightest spot below and left of center is the Crater Tycho! What huge kind of heat it is emitted from inside the Tycho Crater? A volcano? A reflective soil? What is this "warm anomaly" on lunar surface?


Eclipsed Moon in Infrared Credit: DCATT Team, MSX Project
apod.nasa.gov...

From "Astronomy Picture of the Day" 2005 April 23

Explanation: In September of 1996, the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite had a spectacular view of a total lunar eclipse from Earth orbit. SPIRIT III, an on board infrared telescope, was used to repeatedly image the moon during the eclipse. Above is one of the images taken during the 70 minute totality, the Moon completely immersed in the Earth's shadow. Infrared light has wavelengths longer than visible light - humans can not see it but feel it as heat. So, the bright spots correspond to the warm areas on the lunar surface, and dark areas are cooler. The brightest spot below and left of center is the crater Tycho, while the dark region at the upper right is the Mare Crisium.


Another bizarre explanation: An Extraterrestrial "Main" Base inside Tycho Crater?
edit on 2-3-2011 by Arken because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 04:53 AM
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reply to post by Arken
 


Truth is stranger than fiction. Isn't it?


Monoliths are fictional advanced machines built by an unseen extraterrestrial species that appear in Arthur C. Clarke's Space Odyssey series of novels and films.



The first monolith to be discovered in the modern age was unearthed on the moon near Tycho Crater due to it emitting a powerful magnetic field which was detected and investigated. It was called Tycho Magnetic Anomaly 1 (TMA-1) before the monolith was discovered. After it was discovered to be an alien artifact, the name became "Tycho Monolith Anomaly 1" (still TMA-1).


en.wikipedia.org...(Space_Odyssey)



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 05:05 AM
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According to Nasa

It's super heated rock from meteor impact.

Tycho Crater

Then again, You COULD be right. Thats what this site is all about.......questioning what we're told.
If you look at the other bright spots on your pic, that could be a network of tunnels and chambers below the surface. That certainly follows the story of the ET's using the moon as a base.

As I have always said, it all depends on what you want to believe. There are some things that 'the common folk' just couldn't handle.....going back a bit, but look into the grief that was caused during the 'War of the worlds' radio show........thank god we're more intelligent now............or are we?


edit on 2/3/2011 by Therealkaf because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 05:06 AM
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Originally posted by Beamish
reply to post by Arken
 


Truth is stranger than fiction. Isn't it?


Monoliths are fictional advanced machines built by an unseen extraterrestrial species that appear in Arthur C. Clarke's Space Odyssey series of novels and films.



The first monolith to be discovered in the modern age was unearthed on the moon near Tycho Crater due to it emitting a powerful magnetic field which was detected and investigated. It was called Tycho Magnetic Anomaly 1 (TMA-1) before the monolith was discovered. After it was discovered to be an alien artifact, the name became "Tycho Monolith Anomaly 1" (still TMA-1).


en.wikipedia.org...(Space_Odyssey)


Searching for other threads about the Tycho Crater Topic, I stumble on this this one: www.abovetopsecret.com...

And yes. Seem thet there is a "Monolith" inside Tycho Crater and much more....





Maybe Sir Arthur C. Clark was right....



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 05:11 AM
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Would I be right in thinking that the deeper the crater, the longer it would hold heat? Perhaps that is what's happening.



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 03:12 PM
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Originally posted by Therealkaf
According to Nasa

It's super heated rock from meteor impact.

Tycho Crater
It's funny how we can both read the same source and it tells you "It's super heated rock from meteor impact." and it tells me that's definitely NOT what it is, in this part of the article:


How old is Tycho? Because the impact event scattered material to such great distances, it's thought that some of the samples at the Apollo 17 landing site originated at the Tycho impact site. These samples are impact melt glass, and radiometric age dating tells us that they formed 108 million years ago. So if these samples are truly from Tycho, the crater formed 108 million years ago as well.
So, in other words, it was superheated rock 108 million years ago if that's the correct age. For comparison, the Chixulub crater on Earth is 65 million years old and we had a hard time even finding it, so 65 million years is more than enough time for a crater to cool down after an impact. Even meteor crater in AZ isn't any hotter than the surrounding area a mere 50,000 years after the impact.

I don't know if Wikipedia is correct or not, but it says the reason is that the materials that cover the Tycho crater are different, and therefore cool at a slower rate than the rest of the lunar surface.

Tycho (crater)


Infrared observations of the lunar surface during an eclipse have demonstrated that Tycho cools at a slower rate than other parts of the surface, making the crater a "hot spot". This effect is caused by the difference in materials that cover the crater.


That explanation makes a lot more sense than leftover heat from a 108 million year old impact.

JAXA/Selene took amazing imagery of tycho and made it into a fly-around animation. It's awesome, though I didn't happen to notice any monoliths or other structures.

wms.selene.jaxa.jp...
But the animations and the google imagery like the one that shows the monolith aren't as reliable as the original photographs. Google Earth can distort features on the Earth and the moon because of the algorithms it uses to produce imagery.


Originally posted by Arken
And yes. Seem thet there is a "Monolith" inside Tycho Crater and much more....



ArMaP posted some links to very high resolution images of Tycho here: www.abovetopsecret.com...
I downloaded those and never saw any monolith in the original images. Has anyone ever found the monolith in the photographs, instead of on Google Moon imagery?

There's a real monolith on Phobos so it certainly seems possible there's a monolith on the moon also, but I've never seen it in a photo and I don't trust Google Moon to give accurate imagery, nor should anyone else trust it for accuracy. I use Google moon, but then if I want to see something accurately, I look for hi-res images, like the ones ArMaP posted.

Tycho is a very interesting crater.



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 03:26 PM
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I'd go for Wikipedia's explanation.

"Infrared observations of the lunar surface during an eclipse have demonstrated that Tycho cools at a slower rate than other parts of the surface, making the crater a "hot spot". This effect is caused by the difference in materials that cover the crater." en.wikipedia.org...

In other words, Tycho heats up during the lunar day, and cools down a lot slower than other parts of the Moon.
edit on 2-3-2011 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 04:39 AM
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Originally posted by wildespace
I'd go for Wikipedia's explanation.

"Infrared observations of the lunar surface during an eclipse have demonstrated that Tycho cools at a slower rate than other parts of the surface, making the crater a "hot spot". This effect is caused by the difference in materials that cover the crater." en.wikipedia.org...

In other words, Tycho heats up during the lunar day, and cools down a lot slower than other parts of the Moon.
edit on 2-3-2011 by wildespace because: (no reason given)


Maybe this is right... But this is Huge if real.

And this kind of "official explanation" open dark "hot" scenarios!

Why NASA or other Agencies don't (never) investigate with accuracy on THE TYCHO CRATER ANOMALY?
The "difference in materials" that cover the crater it could be fundamental in order to generate easily heat, and energy to acquire for a Lunar Base.

Or we are not yet allowed to build a permanent Lunar Base?
Something don't work.....



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 04:52 AM
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reply to post by Therealkaf
 




There are some things that 'the common folk' just couldn't handle


I don't agree. The old 'the public would panic' arguments have been around as long as the UFO subject has been around. 60% of Americans and probably a much higher percentage of people around the world believe in ET's and that UFO are either a lifeform in their own right, or are the vehicles built and operated by ET life.

I don't see 60% of Americans panicking or indeed anyone else panicking about UFO's and ET's, even though they claim to believe they are real and exist.

People will believe what they are conditioned to believe, just they same as people will react how they are conditioned to react. IOW, the panicking public theory is an excuse to lie and cover the truth of existence from us all.

If kids were taught about ET's and UFO's from birth, there wouldn't be any surprise and certainly no panic from those kids, if ET or an old abandoned Lunar outpost showed up or was made known.

It's convenient to hang on to the secrets, and claim it's in our best interests..which it's isn't of course, but you gotta watch out for the mass panic, it'll jump up and rip your throat out!

Interesting image OP, thanks.

Anyone overlay the image on another moon image to see where those other patches of light show up? Would be interesting to see exactly where they are.

I suppose NASA could be right with the 'red hot rocks from an impact' theory. Although, after millions of years i doubt it.

Could it be radioactive decay from rare elements on the moon, taking millions of years to lose the heat?

edit on 3/3/2011 by spikey because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 05:08 AM
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reply to post by spikey
 


Great spikey! great!

A great (radioactive) star!

Whic kind of "material" or unknown atomic element it can have a so long radioactive decay of hundred of millions years?


Again: something don't work inside Tycho Crater....!!
edit on 3-3-2011 by Arken because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-3-2011 by Arken because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 07:56 AM
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"There are some things that 'the common folk' just couldn't handle"

Like proper science, for example. Some people seem to prefer living in their own kind of world.



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 08:04 AM
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Originally posted by wildespace
"There are some things that 'the common folk' just couldn't handle"

Like proper science, for example. Some people seem to prefer living in their own kind of world.


Right. Like WATER ON THE MOON!

Some people seem to prefer living in their own kind of world made of reassuring, conventional, simple and often false and not corrected official explanations.

What a wonderful world....



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 09:51 AM
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reply to post by Arken
 


Water on the Moon is far from conventional

What's even more unconventional - there might be ice on Mercury.

I simply don't see a reason for me to chase after the conspiracy theories and tinfoil hat stuff. Real science is very exciting and mind-blowing stuff.



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 03:01 PM
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Originally posted by spikey
I suppose NASA could be right with the 'red hot rocks from an impact' theory. Although, after millions of years I doubt it.
As I already said before your post, that's a misunderstanding on the part of Therealkaf, not a "NASA theory". Please deny ignorance, please don't promote it. In a thread this short, you have little excuse for not reading the thread.


Could it be radioactive decay from rare elements on the moon, taking millions of years to lose the heat?
If that was the source, then the crater would still glow brightly in infrared after a couple of weeks in darkness. That's not what happens and contrary to what some people think, scientists are not morons, they would figure it out:

Infrared images of tycho on dark moon.


Infrared images of the thermal anomaly associated with the lunar crater Tycho were obtained during the lunar night after Tycho had ceased to be illuminated by the Sun for as long as 97 hours. In agreement with results of previous studies, these measurements show that the crater is warmer than its surroundings during the lunar night, and that the temperature of the thermal anomaly gradually decreases with time, being no longer detectable after new moon. This work provides strong evidence that the steeper crater walls facing the Sun before local sunset are warmer throughout the cooling phase, and that the Tycho anomaly is thus produced by solar, rather than internal, heat.
That's probably the easiest experiment in the world to do, just take the infrared image in a new moon phase. Nothing shows up. That's how we know it's "produced by solar, rather than internal, heat." This also means that radioactivity isn't the source of the heat.



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 03:08 PM
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Originally posted by Arken
reply to post by spikey
 


Great spikey! great!

A great (radioactive) star!

Whic kind of "material" or unknown atomic element it can have a so long radioactive decay of hundred of millions years?


Again: something don't work inside Tycho Crater....!!
edit on 3-3-2011 by Arken because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-3-2011 by Arken because: (no reason given)



I going to pull this one from the backside: could it be H3 or element 115?



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 04:28 PM
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Originally posted by Arken
Right. Like WATER ON THE MOON!

Some people seem to prefer living in their own kind of world made of reassuring, conventional, simple and often false and not corrected official explanations.
Sorry, I don't understand your point, please explain. It's because of the official explanation that we know about water on the moon, see the scientific photo below:


Originally posted by wildespace
Water on the Moon is far from conventional

What's even more unconventional - there might be ice on Mercury.
There is water on the moon, but there isn't. It depends on how you define water:

science.nasa.gov...

September 24, 2009: NASA scientists have discovered water molecules in the polar regions of the Moon. Instruments aboard three separate spacecraft revealed water molecules in amounts that are greater than predicted, but still relatively small. Hydroxyl, a molecule consisting of one oxygen atom and one hydrogen atom, also was found in the lunar soil. ...

"When we say 'water on the Moon,' we are not talking about lakes, oceans or even puddles," explained Carle Pieters, M3's principal investigator from Brown University, Providence, R.I. "Water on the Moon means molecules of water and hydroxyl that interact with molecules of rock and dust specifically in the top millimeters of the Moon's surface.
It's actually probably a form of ice since liquid water can't exist in a vacuum and the moon's atmosphere is thin enough to qualify as a vacuum for the purposes of ruling out liquid water. They have an image of the moon's water signature where water (and hydroxyl) molecules are in the soil:


Data from NASA's Moon Mineralogy Mapper. The image on the left shows albedo, or the sunlight reflected from the surface of the Moon. The image on the right shows where infrared light is absorbed by water and hydroxyl molecules. The water signature is strongest at cool, high latitudes near the poles. The blue arrow indicates Goldschmidt crater, a large feldspar-rich region with a higher water and hydroxyl signature. Image credit: ISRO/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Brown Univ.
Since ice is probably the major form of water on the moon, with no liquid and very little gas or water vapor, it kind of make sense the image is reminiscent of the polar ice caps on Earth.

Even so, the moon is still pretty dry.

While the abundances are not precisely known, as much as 1,000 water molecule parts-per-million could be in the lunar soil. To put that into perspective, if you harvested one ton of the top layer of the Moon's surface, you could get as much as 32 ounces of water."
If that's correct you'd have to process 4 TONS of lunar soil per day per astronaut to get their water needs, or more if you can't extract all the moisture present (if they don't process and re-drink a purified version of their own urine). There is water in the lunar soil, but I think we're still guessing to some degree about exactly how much is there.



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 06:14 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


Sorry to desagree about WATER on The Moon, (may be your informations about this topic are old) ,but when I say Water I mean really Water/Water Ice and NO only some random molecules on lunar soil:

2010 October 25: Water Ice Detected Beneath Moon's Surface

Explanation: Is there enough water on the moon to sustain future astronauts? The question has important implications if humanity hopes to use the Moon as a future outpost. Last year, to help find out, scientists crashed the moon-orbiting LCROSS spacecraft into a permanently shadowed crater near the Moon's South Pole. New analyses of the resulting plume from Cabeus crater indicate more water than previously thought, possibly about six percent. Additionally, an instrument on the separate LRO spacecraft that measures neutrons indicates that even larger lunar expanses -- most not even permanently shadowed -- may also contain a significant amount of buried frozen water. Pictured above from LRO, areas in false-color blue indicate the presence of soil relatively rich in hydrogen, which is thought likely bound to sub-surface water ice. Conversely, the red areas are likely dry. The location of the Moon's South Pole is also digitally marked on the image. How deep beneath the surface the ice crystals permeate is still unknown, as well as how difficult it would be to mine the crystals and purify them into drinking water.

apod.nasa.gov...

And: www.space.com...
www.abovetopsecret.com...


MOFFETT FIELD, Calif -- A team of NASA scientists announced Friday the discovery of a large amount of water on the moon's south pole.

"Indeed, yes, we found water. And we didn't find just a little bit, we found a significant amount," said Anthony Colaprete, a principal project investigator at NASA's Ames Research Center.


And: www.abovetopsecret.com...

More I dig... more Water on the Moon I find!



posted on Mar, 3 2011 @ 10:27 PM
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Originally posted by Arken
Sorry to desagree about WATER on The Moon
I don't see any disagreement.

The information both of us posted says the polar regions have more water ice, and especially in the polar craters. The information you posted doesn't say anything to contradict the source I posted saying the rest of the moon outside the polar regions is relatively dry.

So it's quite possible to have 6% water in a polar crater and a global average of 0.1%, but both sources say they are still unsure. The image in the link you posted shows the water concentrations are patchy, and the LCROSS summary confirms that:

LCROSS Results Released


Oct. 21, 2010
"NASA has convincingly confirmed the presence of water ice and characterized its patchy distribution in permanently shadowed regions of the moon," said Michael Wargo, chief lunar scientist at NASA


And both sources also confirm some water content outside the permanently shadowed craters though it's thought to be less than in the permanently shadowed craters like the one LCROSS impacted.



posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 10:42 AM
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What is that "THING" inside Tycho Crater?






www.lpi.usra.edu...

A Transient Lunar Phenomenon or What?



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 03:00 AM
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Originally posted by Arken
What is that "THING" inside Tycho Crater?
:puz
I don't know what it is. But I can say what it looks like.

If you cut a single piece off a carpet, you'd find that piece is composed of even smaller fibers. That's exactly what it looks like, a small piece of carpet fiber. Whether that's what it is or how something like that would get in the imager I have no idea. The space missions probably don't use any carpet, but they do use insulation so that might be a possibility?

Whatever it is, it doesn't look like it's on the moon to me, it reminds me of this thing:

www.abovetopsecret.com...


It's something that appeared in moon images that definitely wasn't part of the moon. I understand how it happened in that case but I'm not sure what happened in the Tycho crater photo you posted. What part of the crater is that image from? Center? East of center? East edge?

See if it shows up in this photo:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Originally posted by ArMaP
Morning view


I tried to match it up but I can't tell what part of the crater your image is from.



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