It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The US gave Iraq the green light in the first gulf war.

page: 1
1

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 09:15 AM
link   
Almost everyone says that the first gulf war was a just war. On face value, the first gulf war was a just war. Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait in order to bring them out of their debt and to get more oil to secure more economic prosperity. Alan Glaspie-- the US ambassador to Iraq at the time gave Saddam a green light in order to go to war with Kuwait. It's quite iconic how we gave them a green light to go to war.


TARIQ AZIZ: Our policy in OPEC opposes sudden jumps in oil prices.

HUSSEIN: Twenty-five dollars a barrel is not a high price.

GLASPIE: We have many Americans who would like to see the price go above $25 because they come from oil-producing states.

HUSSEIN: The price at one stage had dropped to $12 a barrel and a reduction in the modest Iraqi budget of $6 billion to $7 billion is a disaster.

GLASPIE: I think I understand this. I have lived here for years. I admire your extraordinary efforts to rebuild your country. I know you need funds. We understand that and our opinion is that you should have the opportunity to rebuild your country. But we have no opinion on the Arab-Arab conflicts, like your border disagreement with Kuwait.

I was in the American Embassy in Kuwait during the late 60's. The instruction we had during this period was that we should express no opinion on this issue and that the issue is not associated with America. James Baker has directed our official spokesmen to emphasize this instruction. We hope you can solve this problem using any suitable methods via Klibi or via President Mubarak. All that we hope is that these issues are solved quickly. With regard to all of this, can I ask you to see how the issue appears to us?

My assessment after 25 years' service in this area is that your objective must have strong backing from your Arab brothers. I now speak of oil But you, Mr. President, have fought through a horrific and painful war. Frankly, we can see only that you have deployed massive troops in the south. Normally that would not be any of our business. But when this happens in the context of what you said on your national day, then when we read the details in the two letters of the Foreign Minister, then when we see the Iraqi point of view that the measures taken by the U.A.E. and Kuwait is, in the final analysis, parallel to military aggression against Iraq, then it would be reasonable for me to be concerned. And for this reason, I received an instruction to ask you, in the spirit of friendship -- not in the spirit of confrontation -- regarding your intentions.

I simply describe the position of my Government. And I do not mean that the situation is a simple situation. But our concern is a simple one.

HUSSEIN: We do not ask people not to be concerned when peace is at issue. This is a noble human feeling which we all feel. It is natural for you as a superpower to be concerned. But what we ask is not to express your concern in a way that would make an aggressor believe that he is getting support for his aggression.

We want to find a just solution which will give us our rights but not deprive others of their rights. But at the same time, we want the others to know that our patience is running out regarding their action, which is harming even the milk our children drink, and the pensions of the widow who lost her husband during the war, and the pensions of the orphans who lost their parents.

As a country, we have the right to prosper. We lost so many opportunities, and the others should value the Iraqi role in their protection. Even this Iraqi [the President points to their interpreter] feels bitter like all other Iraqis. We are not aggressors but we do not accept aggression either. We sent them envoys and handwritten letters. We tried everything. We asked the Servant of the Two Shrines -- King Fahd -- to hold a four-member summit, but he suggested a meeting between the Oil Ministers. We agreed. And as you know, the meeting took place in Jidda. They reached an agreement which did not express what we wanted, but we agreed.

Only two days after the meeting, the Kuwaiti Oil Minister made a statement that contradicted the agreement. We also discussed the issue during the Baghdad summit. I told the Arab Kings and Presidents that some brothers are fighting an economic war against us. And that not all wars use weapons and we regard this kind of war as a military action against us. Because if the capability of our army is lowered then, if Iran renewed the war, it could achieve goals which it could not achieve before. And if we lowered the standard of our defenses, then this could encourage Israel to attack us. I said that before the Arab Kings and Presidents. Only I did not mention Kuwait and U.A.E. by name, because they were my guests.

Before this, I had sent them envoys reminding them that our war had included their defense. Therefore the aid they gave us should not be regarded as a debt. We did not more than the United States would have done against someone who attacked its interests.

I talked about the same thing with a number of other Arab states. I explained the situation t brother King Fahd a few times, by sending envoys and on the telephone. I talked with brother King Hussein and with Sheik Zaid after the conclusion of the summit. I walked with the Sheik to the plane when he was leaving Mosul. He told me, "Just wait until I get home." But after he had reached his destination, the statements that came from there were very bad -- not from him, but from his Minister of Oil.

And after the Jidda agreement, we received some intelligence that they were talking of sticking to the agreement for two months only. Then they would change their policy. Now tell us, if the American President found himself in this situation, what would he do? I said it was very difficult for me to talk about these issues in public. But we must tell the Iraqi people who face economic difficulties who was responsible for that.

Talks with Mubarak

GLASPIE: I spent four beautiful years in Egypt.

HUSSEIN: The Egyptian people are kind and good and ancient. The oil people are supposed to help the Egyptian people, but they are mean beyond belief. It is painful to admit it, but some of them are disliked by Arabs because of their greed.

GLASPIE: Mr. President, it would be helpful if you could give us an assessment of the effort made by your Arab brothers and whether they have achieved anything.

HUSSEIN: On this subject, we agreed with President Mubarak that the Prime Minister of Kuwait would meet with the deputy chairman of the Revolution Command Council in Saudi Arabia, because the Saudis initiated contact with us, aided by President Mubarak's efforts. He just telephoned me a short while ago to say the Kuwaitis have agreed to that suggestion.


chss.montclair.edu...

As you can tell, the ambassador to Iraq was in bed with Saddam Hussein. If April didn't represent Bush's opinions why did he hire her in the first place?




posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 09:47 AM
link   
Here's an interesting wikileak cable pertaining to the entire issue.... I stumbled upon this a few months ago.

213.251.145.96...

SADDAM WISHED TO CONVEY AN IMPORTANT MESSAGE TO PRESIDENT BUSH: IRAQ WANTS FRIENDSHIP, BUT DOES THE USG? IRAQ SUFFERED 100,000'S OF CASUALTIES AND IS NOW SO POOR THAT WAR ORPHAN PENSIONS WILL SOON BE CUT; YET RICH KUWAIT WILL NOT EVEN ACCEPT OPEC DISCIPLINE. IRAQ IS SICK OF WAR, BUT KUWAIT HAS IGNORED DIPLOMACY. USG MANEUVERS WITH THE UAE WILL ENCOURAGE THE UAE AND KUWAIT TO IGNORE CONVENTIONAL DIPLOMACY. IF IRAQ IS PUBLICLY HUMILIATED BY THE USG, IT WILL HAVE NO CHOICE BUT TO "RESPOND," HOWEVER ILLOGICAL AND SELF DESTRUCTIVE THAT WOULD PROVE.



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 09:48 AM
link   
Don't forget that the Bush administration didnt care about the invasion until Hussein put tanks on the Saudi border. Only then did we hear the stories about kuwati hospitals ...



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 01:26 PM
link   
reply to post by Frankidealist35
 


Alan Glaspie gave the green light because the US State Department had been using the CIA to "stroke" Saddam into a confrontation for a couple of years (starting just after the failure of the Iran/Iraq war). But Saddam was not in a position to invade Kuwait as his weapons were seriously depleted. So, enter the US State Department again and the weapons deals of 1988/89 along with Armscor/SA CI, Magnus Malan, Pik Botha, Israel, France, ADS and Eddie Perkins (US ambassador to South Africa) and a game farm called Oliphants in Kruger National Park. I remember those days well, since the company I worked for (I was Chief of R&D) handled the weapons deals to set Saddam up so that he could invade Kuwait. It's a long time ago now, but you can't un-remember what you saw or did.

Remember the Angola War between the South Africans and the MLA? John Stockwell was the CIA point man that handled logistics and recon for UNITA and the SADF, the US State Department was up to their tits in that one as well. How do I know? Bin there (in Angola during the war, SA and Zim), done that and all I got was the damn t-shirt and a broken rib from a sniper bullet.

Anyway, that's the way I remember it and from my notes of the time. If I said anything that offends anyone, my apologies. The truth may hurt but it can never be a lie (a friend of mine now in Zaire used to say that).

Cheers - Dave



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 03:40 PM
link   
Wasnt a real big help that April had a habit of showing up drunk to meetings with the Iraqis either.
A guy who once worked for a little Italian bank that did a lot of business with the Iraqis later worked for my father and at one time wanted my father to ghost write his inside story. Lots of stories this guy had to tell about underwriting grain shipments and weapons deals. Fun stuff.




top topics
 
1

log in

join