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'Microsoft support centre' scam continues, and takes turn for worse

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posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 03:23 AM
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'Microsoft support centre' scam continues, and takes turn for worse


www.guardian.co.uk

The scam whereby people in Indian call centres ring up and insist that they are calling from "Microsoft Windows Support" and that they have been alerted - by Microsoft, or your ISP - that "your computer is running slowly because of viruses" - is still going on.

And they're still charging people for their fake "help", and people are still falling for it: I get a few emails a week confirming it (and that of course is only the people who realise they've been had). If you need confirmation, Microsoft's Answers system is stuffed with people asking about it

Until now, it has been a re
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
[url=http://www.onenewspage.co.uk/news/Money/20110301/20085937/Microsoft-support-centre-scam-continues-and-takes-turn.htm]www.onenewspage.co.uk[/url ]




posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 03:23 AM
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Has anyone experienced this or knows of someone who was scammed by this calling center?

Pretty much any user who owns a computer is running a Windows OS. So far nothing has happened to me. But it is good to be aware that there are scammers trying to steal information from you.

I actually had someone call me regarding a credit card I had with them and wanted to know if I wanted to sign up for a new points system with them. I asked them where they were calling from and how they got my number. They did not respond so I sent them packing. Be careful, trust no one.

www.guardian.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 03:27 AM
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Not similar to that but I had some slag ring me up saying that she saw my profile on Facebook saying I was really hot, and she wouldn't tell me how she got my number, pretty scary stuff.



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 03:33 AM
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reply to post by Sounds_of_Silence
 


Facebook has taken to publishing phone numbers of people who use facebook app's on their phone. There is a way to go in and remove your number from people seeing it.


@OP
There was a poster recently who asked about this very thing & came here asking for advice, about a month ago if I'm correct.
The term deny ignorance should apply to life in general instead of just this website



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 04:02 AM
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this is exactly why I usually use fake names, fake numbers, fake everything. you can't put trust into random people on random servers to keep your info private, weather they have a policy or weather they 'tell you' in the fine print. stopped using facebook when they tried to claim royalties on any musical data uploaded to the site. its probably a bit late for that for most people, you should know the risks before you put anything online, and then check your security settings twice. then again the next day.

also, microsoft imho made half the viruses out there for the purposes of data collection, I wouldn't be suprised if this scam is one of their employees or ex-employees using their knowledge to mess with people.



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 04:31 AM
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Some good advice in this post S&F. Heres some advice i would like to add :

If you get unsolicited calls dont just send them packing, report it to your mobile service or landline service.

If a caller asks " can I speak to Mr John Smith" tell them Mr John Smith does not exist. If you receive unsolicited mail addressed to "Mr John Smith" and not John Smith, dont open it. Send it back. ( Search "Freeman" online for an answer to why).

Always ask yourself this question " Why does this person need my information"? or even better if someone asks you a question that you have concerns about answering.... listen to their question, then tell them to answer the question first. They will hang up.

Information is money nowadays. Practice anonymity at all times and be safe from scammers , government and other organisations.

Respects
edit on 1-3-2011 by captiva because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 04:59 AM
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It's been happening a bit in Australia,they were talking about it on the radio the other day,one callers suggestion was to tell them you own a Mac,LOL
Just other of the many scamming dogs about,i got this email the other day
i don't even bank with this company,





Your account has been suspended

Because of concerns for the safety and integrity of your bank account
we have issued this warning message.

As part of our security measures, we regularly screen activity in the Deutsche Bank system . We recently contacted you after noticing an issue on your account.We requested information from you for the following reason:
Our system detected unusual charges to a credit card linked to your bank account.

The procedure is very simple :

1. Click on the link below to open a secure browser window.
2. Confirm that you are the owner of the account and follow the instructions.

Activate Your Account


edit on 1/3/2011 by Travlla because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 05:04 AM
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I had two emails the other day..both from supposedly legitimate sources...both asking for my details.. both are scams..

sent to me two days apart, somebody somewhere knows i have a link between the two accounts.

One was supposedly from paypal, the other from my bank..

These may be automated messages sent out when links are established.. my computer is very safe.. but somewhere along the line, this info is being collected and a picture has been built..

be careful out there..



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 05:08 AM
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reply to post by madscientistintraining
 


u speaka ma language! either tell em nowt or inform them they need to request form 27b-6. if they ask you for an address inform them they require form 27b-6 and on and on and on...
regards fakedirt



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 05:10 AM
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Seems only idiots give their personal information out on the net....

In my 15 years online I received perhaps 100 SPAM mails including 5 Nigerian scams. Never had facebook or other social crap. Occasionally had a virus alert and must've downloaded over 100 TB of stuff.

I admit I had to reinstall my system every week for the first few months I was online due to not understanding the net and dangers but come on.... that's 15 yrs ago.

Somehow I think these people attract these scammers.



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 05:22 AM
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There are sites i trust and others I don't. Microsoft, google and alike I have my real name and address there, i use their products already, but for social media like facebook im skeptical and do not use them.



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 05:26 AM
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Originally posted by madscientistintraining

also, microsoft imho made half the viruses out there for the purposes of data collection, I wouldn't be suprised if this scam is one of their employees or ex-employees using their knowledge to mess with people.


Don't be so ridiculous. With antisocial notworking sites like Facebook, people are climbing over themselves to give up every intimate detail of their sad little lives. Microsoft doesn't need to go out of their way to harvest personal information from people using illegal means when they give it up willingly, and legally.

Now antivirus providers, that's a different story. They would actually have a vested interest in propagating malware as it would generate them income via sales. But there's no real evidence of that either.



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 05:26 AM
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reply to post by Skywatcher2011
 


GOES TO SHOW HOW BRAINWASHED HUMANS HAVE BECOME...
Sad observation...



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 05:37 AM
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I know several people who have had the phone calls and some have fallen for the scam.

It's rife in UK, but police say they can't do much about it. As fast as they shut an operation down another one starts up.

Regarding unsoliceted calls in general if I'm not busy at the time I have some fun with them and wind them right up until they give up. More entertaining than watching tv.



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 06:02 AM
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I've had the phone call claiming to be someone from Microsoft. I would never have fallen for it, but luckily I had read somewhere online already about this scam before getting the phone call. I raked the guy over the coals so badly I almost felt sorry for him when I finally told him to "have a good day" and hung up. There was a huge language barrier, so i'm not sure he even knew what I saying, but I'm pretty sure he got the message


Michelle



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 06:05 AM
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reply to post by Skywatcher2011
 
Hi Skywatcher, I had a friend who was rung about 3 times last year. 1st time they played dumb and asked me about it afterwards. I work in IT so I checked out their pc and gave it a clean bill of health after updating their virus scanner. 2nd & 3rd time they (my friend) told them I had checked their pc and they (the scammer) still insisted on needing to check it.My friend hung up on them.
It made me wish that they would call me, which they did two weeks ago when I was working from home. They spoke to my wife (who knew what was going on) who told them they should speak to me as I work in IT and would understand. They said yes they would, sounding deflated. When she was handing over the phone they hung up.....now that was funny.



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 06:22 AM
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I have heard of this happening to a number of people here in the UK. At the end of last year I was house-sitting for my parents for a few days and got one of these calls in the evening. An Indian sounding woman phoned up asking for my father claiming to be from his ISP. They had reports of broadband going slow in the area (by sheer coincidence it had been as there was some issue at the very small exchange locally). I said I was him and figured id be aswell getting it sorted out. I started to become suspicious though and she asked me to go through and Google something and then install some software. I knew something was up before this point but wanted to see where it was going.

The url was for some desktop sharing software - basically they were trying to get me to install this app and I assume hand over control of the computer to them.

She claimed she was from tech support. Tech support for who I asked? The broadband I was told. Which ISP is that? We are not from an ISP but are tech support for broadband. So I had a call from tech support from the very internet itself. After quizzing her a bit more I told her it was bollocks, not to insult my intelligence and not to call back again.

Luckily my folks wouldn't have gone ahead with this either and consulted me. Quite alarming to think of the number of people who would unwittingly do such a thing to some anonymous person in an Indian call centre. How they got his details to ask by name Id like to know though - I googled it at the time and there was some online suspicion regarding More Than Insurance. Perhaps they had employees slurping data.

edit on 1-3-2011 by Beegs because: typos!

edit on 1-3-2011 by Beegs because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 07:49 AM
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Originally posted by captiva
If you receive unsolicited mail addressed to "Mr John Smith" and not John Smith, dont open it. Send it back. ( Search "Freeman" online for an answer to why).
I don't think that search term was specific enough, I got:

"How to send your fan mail and autograph requests to Morgan Freeman" in the search results and other unrelated stuff.

The advice I heard was DON'T send it back, because sending it back only confirms to them they have a live e-mail address. Isn't it better to not respond?

Regarding the microsoft scam, I pretty much assume that all correspondence I receive from anyone I don't personally know may be a scam. I may miss out on a legitimate offer or two that way, but I've never been scammed that way.



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 07:53 AM
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Originally posted by captiva
If you receive unsolicited mail addressed to "Mr John Smith" and not John Smith, dont open it. Send it back. ( Search "Freeman" online for an answer to why).
I don't think that search term was specific enough, I got:

"How to send your fan mail and autograph requests to Morgan Freeman" in the search results and other unrelated stuff.

The advice I heard was DON'T send it back, because sending it back only confirms to them they have a live e-mail address. Isn't it better to not respond?

Regarding the Microsoft scam, I pretty much assume that all phone calls and correspondence I receive from anyone I don't personally know may be a scam. I may miss out on a legitimate offer or two that way, but I've never been scammed that way.



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 07:53 AM
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Microsofty does not exsist kthx.



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