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Civil War Message Decoded

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posted on Feb, 28 2011 @ 11:30 PM
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reply to post by sugarcookie1
 


I can't believe no one was curious for 147 years..
I would have opened the bottle as soon as I saw a note inside..
Amazing..s&f




posted on Feb, 28 2011 @ 11:31 PM
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reply to post by boondock-saint
 


Just saw one in the back of a truck window about a week ago!

In response to another poster who brought up state rights and the beginnings of the erosion of freedom...I find this a paradox (not sure if that's an accurate term) in that while the states were fighting for their rights, the federal government was fighting for the rights of individuals. I may have rose colored glasses about it, but that's how I have always seen it. Neither cause can be marginalized as both were valid, however, I think the rights of individuals should always prevail over the rights of organizations.



posted on Feb, 28 2011 @ 11:42 PM
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Originally posted by nunya13
the federal government was fighting for the rights of individuals.

don't sound too much like they were
fighting for individual rights when Lincoln
imposed a draft on the people to serve in the
Union Army which caused a riot in NY City in 1863.


During a long hot July in 1863, the worst race riots the United States has ever seen erupt in New York City. Earlier that year, desperate for more Union soldiers, President Abraham Lincoln instituted a draft–a draft that would allow the wealthy to escape serving in the army by paying a $300 waiver, more than a year’s income for the recent immigrant Irish. And on July 11, as the first drawing takes place in Lower Manhattan, the city of New York explodes in rage and fire.


www.goodreads.com...

seeing as though you could avoid the draft
by paying $300.00. Sounds a lil like extortion
to me or the rich buying themselves a ticket
to sit out the war.



posted on Feb, 28 2011 @ 11:48 PM
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Originally posted by backinblack
reply to post by sugarcookie1
 


I can't believe no one was curious for 147 years..
I would have opened the bottle as soon as I saw a note inside..
Amazing..s&f


I know i sure would have ! I would have been to curious to see what was in there and thanks for the bump



posted on Feb, 28 2011 @ 11:59 PM
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Originally posted by sugarcookie1

Originally posted by backinblack
reply to post by sugarcookie1
 

I can't believe no one was curious for 147 years..
I would have opened the bottle as soon as I saw a note inside..
Amazing..s&f

I know i sure would have ! I would have been to curious to see what was in there and thanks for the bump

well I would have been curious too
but I also know that some war
cables were rigged with poison
if they fell into enemy hands,
whoever opened it might die
or either the cable might be destroyed
by a chemical substance inside.
I guess technology improved to the
point where danger or damage could
be eliminated from the equation.



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 12:12 AM
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Originally posted by boondock-saint

Originally posted by sugarcookie1

Originally posted by backinblack
reply to post by sugarcookie1
 

I can't believe no one was curious for 147 years..
I would have opened the bottle as soon as I saw a note inside..
Amazing..s&f

I know i sure would have ! I would have been to curious to see what was in there and thanks for the bump

well I would have been curious too
but I also know that some war
cables were rigged with poison
if they fell into enemy hands,
whoever opened it might die
or either the cable might be destroyed
by a chemical substance inside.
I guess technology improved to the
point where danger or damage could
be eliminated from the equation.


Thanks for pointing that out i never thought about that but i probably still would have opened it not knowing about possible poison and died holding the bottle in my hand



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 02:16 AM
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Originally posted by sugarcookie1
Thanks for pointing that out i never thought about that but i probably still would have opened it not knowing about possible poison and died holding the bottle in my hand

maybe you should have hired me
to be your intelligence analyst ???
I might could have saved you.

lmao



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 02:37 AM
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Originally posted by boondock-saint

Originally posted by sugarcookie1
Thanks for pointing that out i never thought about that but i probably still would have opened it not knowing about possible poison and died holding the bottle in my hand

maybe you should have hired me
to be your intelligence analyst ???
I might could have saved you.

lmao


Your funny i like you!!



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 02:42 AM
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Originally posted by sugarcookie1
Your funny i like you!!

awwwww shucks
(blushing and kicks rocks)
bet you say that to all the
intelligence analysts ???

lmao



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 02:54 AM
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Originally posted by boondock-saint

Originally posted by sugarcookie1
Your funny i like you!!

awwwww shucks
(blushing and kicks rocks)
bet you say that to all the
intelligence analysts ???

lmao


Well i don't know any other intelligence analysts so i guess your special



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 03:11 AM
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It is astounding that message remained a mystery for so long. Better late than never, because that war was one for the ages. In its day it was one of the most carnage and blood ridden engagements in human history. Although, the reasons for its inception remains murky and illusive to this day, we can all agree on one thing its sheer devastation and the immeasurable human cost it had on the United States.

The siege cost the Union over 4,000 casualties, and the Confederacy over 30,000 with nearly all that number surrendering in an emaciated state, and after being pardoned by General Grant, they would rejoin Confederate ranks to fight again later. General Lee lost at Gettysburg the following day. It is too bad the Confederate leadership did not get the memo after these consequential defeats to end hostilities, and seek surrender negotiations.

Perhaps, if they had read the tea leaves then, Atlanta and the state of Georgia would have been spared and John Wilkes Boothe would have continued his profession as a thespian instead of an assassin? Who knows why the Confederate leadership chose to slug it out after Lee's Army of Northern Virginia was given a shock to the system at Gettysburg and after losing a key supply line in the Mississippi river to reinforce its western theater? Very interesting topic! Thanks OP!
edit on 1-3-2011 by Jakes51 because: Fixed an historical typo. Changed "Army of Potomac," to "Army of Northern Virginia."



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 03:13 AM
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Originally posted by sugarcookie1
Well i don't know any other intelligence analysts so i guess your special

no, not special at all
and I'm not really an intelligence
analyst. I just love to play one
on ATS


I'm just a regular schmoe



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 03:34 AM
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Originally posted by Jakes51
It is astounding that message remained a mystery for so long. Better late than never, because that war was one for the ages. In its day it was one of the most carnage and blood ridden engagements in human history. Although, the reasons for its inception remains murky and illusive to this day, we can all agree on one thing its sheer devastation and the immeasurable human cost it had on the United States.

The siege cost the Union over 4,000 casualties, and the Confederacy over 30,000 with nearly all that number surrendering in an emaciated state, and after being pardoned by General Grant, they would rejoin Confederate ranks to fight again later. General Lee lost at Gettysburg the following day. It is too bad the Confederate leadership did not get the memo after these consequential defeats to end hostilities, and seek surrender negotiations.

Perhaps, if they had read the tea leaves then, Atlanta and the state of Georgia would have been spared and John Wilkes Boothe would have continued his profession as a thespian instead of an assassin? Who knows why the

Confederate leadership chose to slug it out after Lee's Army of Northern Virginia was given a shock to the system at Gettysburg and after losing a key supply line in the Mississippi river to reinforce its western theater? Very interesting topic! Thanks OP!
edit on 1-3-2011 by Jakes51 because: Fixed an historical typo. Changed "Army of Potomac," to "Army of Northern Virginia."


I'm so glad you enjoyed the thread i felt it was worth posting ..
alot of men were lost on both sides war to me is so sad..maybe reading the note could have changed history but who knows




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