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Global Protest spreads to Oman

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posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 05:05 PM
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Ok, I think it's about time we call this Global Protest, because that's what it is. Besides Oman, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait are in trouble now. I'm so happy for our brothers in that part of the planet, God bless them all, my prayers to the martyrs.


Gulf protests spread to Oman. Opposition grows in Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait

Protests against the tight grip of Gulf rulers widened Sunday as riot police in Oman battled pro-democracy demonstrators in a deadly clash that sharply raised tensions in the region.

Tiny Bahrain is already in turmoil and giant Saudi Arabia is seeking to hold back calls for reforms.

The Gulf protests have shaken the once-comfortable command of various monarchs and sheiks. An ever deeper and sustained political revolt would thrust the Arab world's uprising into the heart of the region's oil riches and Washington's front-line allies against Iran.

The U.S. has long counted on the Gulf's rulers as reliable partners — particularly their common ground over concerns about Iran's efforts to expand its influence. No ruling system has given way, but cracks are evident.


gulfnews.com...
www.cbc.ca...


SOHAR, Oman, Feb. 27 (UPI) -- Military troops opened fire on about 1,000 protesters in Sohar, Oman, Sunday, killing at least two of them, witnesses said.


www.upi.com...


edit on 27-2-2011 by Trueman because: (no reason given)

edit on 27-2-2011 by Trueman because: (no reason given)

edit on 27-2-2011 by Trueman because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 05:56 PM
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I've got a list going at my site with all the countries involved. More and more every day led by modern communications. Tower of Babel here we come!


Oman (military response)(new)
Iraq (military response)(new)
Yemen (new)
North Korea (new, isolated)
Algeria Libya (military response)
Egypt
Tunisia
Bahrain (military response)
China (controlled, probable leaders killed)
Iran (controlled, possible leaders killed)
U.S. (US Uncut protests/70k union supporters, 50 states)(new)
U.K. (UK Uncut protests)(new)
Saudi Arabia (planned start: March 11, 2011)

Coming in March, Facebook page is active
Saudi Arabia



posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 06:12 PM
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reply to post by billxam
 


Thanks for that list. It's simply amazing. Like I said in other thread, I don't know what are the cubans and venezuelans waiting for !



posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 06:20 PM
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Originally posted by Trueman
reply to post by billxam
 


Thanks for that list. It's simply amazing. Like I said in other thread, I don't know what are the cubans and venezuelans waiting for !


Most don't know it but Chavez was the first to have trouble, starting in December of 2010. Told the U.S. to shut our pie holes about it. Pretty soon Obama will be holding fort by himself. Can't believe I said that.


Link
link

Protests over media freedom continued in Venezuela Tuesday, a day after two student protesters were killed in separate clashes. Student leaders opposed to cable operators' decision to drop five television channels, including an opposition station, for failure to follow broadcast laws pleaded for an end to the violence at a demonstration in front of the state-run broadcaster.



posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 09:40 PM
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If Oman protest grow, then I am more convinced that, while arguably justifiable in cases, such protest are done at the request and with the support of Islamic theocracy advocates and Iran.

I spent some time in Oman and never came across anyone unhappy with the state of their nation. Sultan Qaboos transformed the nation from a series of dirt homes and no technology or prosperity, to one of the greatest in the middle east for individual prosperity and freedom. An American could feel comfortable and secure there and locals were friendly and hospitable.

If genuine, then I think this would be an isolated case. Aside from Iranian/islamic theocracy influence, the only possible realistic cause would be from some power seeking high ranking official. I say this since there is some concern over who will succeed the Sultan upon his death. The Sultan, who overthrew his father, has no heirs. The nation was likely on the verge of establishing a complete democracy.



posted on Feb, 28 2011 @ 02:35 AM
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reply to post by Wolf321
 


Thanks for your post, interesting information from someone who had been there. Anyway, when the militar forces shoot civilian protesters in the streets, that government has to be removed.



posted on Feb, 28 2011 @ 11:04 AM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


One report calls it military, another calls it security force. Oman has a national police force, that while structured and national like the army or navy, it is still nothing more than local police. The report says they fired rubber bullets. Clearly, such action is intended as a non-lethal action, although such is really a less-than lethal tool and can kill. Oman's police force is inexperienced with dealing with large protest as mentioned, because as I have mentioned, the people are content.

With this particular and isolated incident, I don't think it is representative of the government as a whole. More likely, some inexperienced police forces may have used excessive force or simply underestimated their less-than lethal options. Such things happen in the US on a weekly basis, and clearly aren't representative of the state/national governments.

I will be watching this story closely, but I suspect an outside influence.



posted on Feb, 28 2011 @ 12:52 PM
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Good luck to people in Oman


@billxam
You should also add Croatia and Greece to your list (check my topic if you want).



posted on Feb, 28 2011 @ 06:12 PM
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Here the latest about Oman :


Renewed protest in Oman, despite sultan's promise of jobs
Feb 28, 2011, 17:22 GMT


Muscat - Protesters gathered in the industrial city of Sohar in Oman Monday for the third straight day to call for political reform and an end to corruption.

The rare showing of public discontent in the Gulf sultanate comes despite promises by Sultan Qaboos to create more job opportunities.


www.monstersandcritics.com...



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 08:33 AM
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Was looking over the Times of Oman online today and saw a couple of things that sent up flags for me.


“We need a new constitution, an official apology from the authorities concerned to the family of the people who died in Sohar firing and more power to Majlis Al Shura,” said Basma Al Kiyumi, a demonstrator, adding the government should sack the corrupt ministers and set up a better social welfare system.
Citizens of all age groups and from all walks of life took part in the peaceful protest. “Providing unemployment allowances and 50,000 jobs will not pacify us. There are other serious issues which have to be dealt with. We need social justice and equality. So we are sticking to our new demands,” she added.


Times of Oman

Emphasis mine. This line is being repeated around the region and is directly related to the proponents of an islamic theocracy.

From a conspiracy aspect, I could even theorize that the shooting incident was carried out by police officers in on the plan in order to start the spread of protest. I am concerned for the future of Oman.
edit on 1-3-2011 by Wolf321 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 06:09 PM
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reply to post by Wolf321
 


This is the way I see this. People in these countries had understood they deserve a better life, based in the model we've been offering. A few changes won't be enough, they want something closer to our style of life. They want to participate in the decisions of their government, they want the right to say "no", the right to change their leader if that person doesn't acomplish their goals. Cast societies will die soon.

They people found out now their leaders could make all these reforms long time ago and now they want to make those reforms just because they don't want to loose the power.Of course there will be always someone who will try to take advantage of the situation, but that's unavoidable and it's up to them to choose which path to take.



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 06:23 PM
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Oman has what could probably best be called a representative monarchy. There is a bicameral legislation under a sultan. The people do participate within the countries government. As far as caste structure, I don't recall such among the people, although foreign workers such as filipino and indians were looked down upon.


Originally posted by Trueman
reply to post by Wolf321
 
Of course there will be always someone who will try to take advantage of the situation, but that's unavoidable and it's up to them to choose which path to take.


This is what it all comes down to, and also why it is worthy of being on this website; the possibility that there is a conspiracy being lead by Iran or other religious organizations trying to restructure the middle east. People without the benefit of the truth of a situation can always, have always and will always be manipulated.



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 02:50 AM
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Does the sultan have the majority?

Originally posted by Wolf321
Oman has what could probably best be called a representative monarchy. There is a bicameral legislation under a sultan.




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