Car that runs on compressed air gets 200 mpg..

page: 1
10
<<   2 >>

log in

join

posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 05:54 PM
link   
Thought this was pretty cool...

from 2007..anyone own one yet?



and for all you go-cart enthusiasts..





and you have to have the cool looking taxi too..


edit on 25-2-2011 by baddmove because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 07:03 PM
link   
reply to post by baddmove
 


I saw this in 2007. It's a crime that we are still slaves to big oil.



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 08:14 PM
link   
Wow I have never heard of this before! Sounds awesome, and its so simple!

Why haven't I heard of this before? oh yeah... corporate greed



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 08:28 PM
link   
Just another example of how cheap energy is being suppressed while we are all forced to pay gobs of money for oil, when obviously there are several other more energy efficient, cheaper to make/buy alternatives.



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 09:00 PM
link   
I actually have a design on my table right now (hobby table, not worktable) for a 4 passenger car running off a compressed-air converted Briggs & Stratton riding mower engine and modified riding mower transmission that will go 30 mph for about 70 miles with 6 Type S air tanks from an oxy-acetylene welder with compressed air instead of oxygen.

I recently got the welding equipment, and this spring I should have the prototype built. Cost about $500.00 using mostly recycled parts. The design of the car itself is based off of early 1900's steam cars.

I'm actually hoping to take the design beyond the hobby stage and actually try and market them to a niche market. I also have a hot-air airship design that I can put together for about $7000 that I could fund with those car sales.



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 07:57 AM
link   
reply to post by Control
 


a system of replenishing the compressed air tanks from the motion of travel could possibly add a few more miles to the journey. any chance of a diagram?
regards f



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 08:34 AM
link   
200 is not very fast.
as it is simlar to steam trains,
and that is very old tec.
and why not use steam power?



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 09:28 AM
link   
reply to post by buddha
 


Not very fast? What?

Its 200 miles per gallon, not miles per hour.



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 09:36 AM
link   
Here are some images to look at..

some are really cool looking..

some are bizarre..lol

images
edit on 26-2-2011 by baddmove because: spelling



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 09:43 AM
link   
reply to post by baddmove
 


interesting pictures. i wonder as to how much energy is required for the charging of the system compared to distance travelled in any given model?
f



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 10:50 AM
link   
No, no diagrams up here, but I'll be taking lots of pics during the construction phase. I'm sure I'll remember this thread in April or May and I'll revive it with some pics then. I've played around with some reciprocating designs like you were suggesting, but they add too much weight to be feasible. I do have a wind-powered air compressor set up at home though. I also have a shrader-valve refill nozzle set-up that will allow a gas station air compressor to refill the cars tanks though. Cost about $5.00 for a fill up for 6 Type-S tanks.

To the other poster: Steam is infeasible for use in modern cars because of the operational maintenance required and the inherent danger in pressurized steam (even with a monotube flash "safety" boiler). To be honest, most people are just too darn dumb to be trusted to drive down the street in a steam car safely. I would trust the average poverty stricken citizen of India to safely operate a steam car faster than I would trust a middle class American. In fact, there is a current ongoing project in western India right now converting old Yamaha 125cc motorbikes to run off of two SCUBA tanks of compressed air. They are having resounding success and there are many videos on youtube.

Compressed air is also known as "cold steam" as it operates on identical principals without the the requirement of heat to create the pressure. Many fireless locomotives were powered by compressed air including mining trams and many streetcar and short-haul passenger trains from the 1850's to the 1930's in England, Germany, France and the US.

I'm not posting any diagrams or plans here because I have done enough research to know that my design is original and I haven't started the patent process yet (waiting for the working prototype before I spend the time and effort) and I don't want to run the risk of it being co-opted by the folks who are already making production air cars (there are three or four).



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 11:10 AM
link   
reply to post by Control
 

i understand your concerns regarding diagrams. all the best with the project.
2nd
f



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 12:40 PM
link   

Originally posted by Control
I also have a shrader-valve refill nozzle set-up that will allow a gas station air compressor to refill the cars tanks though. Cost about $5.00 for a fill up for 6 Type-S tanks.


That's brilliant since a lot of gas stations have air compressors. Some are even free.



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 01:47 PM
link   
Actually the vid says it gets 200 miles from one tank of air but it doesn't say how much energy it takes to compress the air in that tank. Not saying that it does not have it's good points. Clean exhaust, lighter than batteries for electric cars and centralized power generation can also be cleaner and more efficient but I wonder what kind of milage a diesel engine in the same car would get.



posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 01:40 PM
link   
Can they still call them motor vehicals now that there is no combustion engine.

You didnt need insurance for a Sinclair C5 or a Bicycle. Do you think you will require the same documentation as you would a motor vehical?.
edit on 27/2/11 by Ezappa because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 02:40 PM
link   
reply to post by Ezappa
 


Good question..

same here, we don't need insurance for scooters either..

like Vespa's or Honda's...



posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 02:56 PM
link   
This post should read "a car that goes 200 miles on a tank of compressed air"

My question is how fast does it go?



posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 03:15 PM
link   

Originally posted by Ezappa
Can they still call them motor vehicals now that there is no combustion engine.

You didnt need insurance for a Sinclair C5 or a Bicycle. Do you think you will require the same documentation as you would a motor vehical?.
edit on 27/2/11 by Ezappa because: (no reason given)


No, the law considers only gasoline internal combustion or diesel compression powered vehicles to be "motor vehicles." I've talked to the BMV in my state and they confirmed that my vehicle design would require no tags or insurance or operators permit. Same as a Vespa. It *could* vary from State to State.

With that in mind, I contacted my local insurance agency, and they *would* insure the vehicle so I've thought about requiring insurance as a condition of purchasing the vehicle considering it's weight and speed limitations. I also wouldn't sell one to someone who wasn't a licensed driver. Not that I "think drivers licenses and insurance are the best thing since sliced bread" or anything, but I wouldn't want anything coming back on me in the form of a liability suit.



posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 03:28 PM
link   
Here is the link to the inventor : MDI.
The documentation is interesting : Comparison fuel/batteries/air

People like to drive cars with at least 100KWh, that do at least 180km/h, that accelerate at least in 10sec to 100km/h.... that is why you don't see one on the road.



posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 03:35 PM
link   
The problem with compressed air cars is that they are not sufficient in providing the capabilities of a gas powered vehicle.

Simply put, if the technology cannot satisfy the requirements of freight trucks and planes, which consume a large majority of demand.

If the technology can not change the enitre industry then there is no point in driving an air compressed car.





top topics
 
10
<<   2 >>

log in

join