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Florida Gov. Rick Scott slams drug database as "invasion of privacy"

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posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 10:59 AM
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www.tampabay.com...


Florida Gov. Rick Scott was unfazed Tuesday by the criticism he's getting from out-of-state politicians over his proposal to kill a proposed prescription tracking system designed to crack down on "pill mills" that supply painkillers and other illicit medications to drug dealers and addicts.

He accused the Florida Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Foundation of wasting private money that it has raised to pay for the system.

"I don't support the database," Scott said at a news conference. "I believe it's an invasion of privacy."

Scott also said, "It has come to my attention that thousands of dollars have been spent on lawyers, travel, meals for board members."


www.politico.com...


Florida Gov. Rick Scott voiced tentative support for collective bargaining agreements — so long as union members are aware of what their leaders are negotiating for.

“My belief is as long as people know what they’re doing, collective bargaining is fine,” Scott said Tuesday on WFLA Radio. That is, he said, “as long as people know what they are voting for.”


I was strongly against Rick Scott becoming the governor of my state but now that he is governor I have to say my support for him is definitely very high. He is managing his job in a professional manner, is not trying to pick large scale fights, is intelligently cutting down government, and is trying his hardest to balance our budget sheets. Maybe it is true, there are actually politicians who are not lifeless corpses.

While he was a millionaire businessman he still supports the right for workers to collectively bargain in this staunch "right-to-work" state and has vocally criticized agencies for wasting taxpayer dollars, for corruption, and has rejected calls to establish a drug database which he criticizes as an "invasion of privacy". At the same time you have worthless Senators from outside of Florida sticking their noses in his business telling him to let this invasion of privacy program to begin.
edit on 2/25/2011 by Misoir because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 11:21 AM
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The problem with programs such as this, the database, is that it is seemingly a good thing. I mean, who doesn't want to stop drug dealers and addicts from being able to obtain a constant supply of drugs from so called "pill mills". But then this is exactly the talking point that gets databases like this started.

The problem starts when one begins to realize that these databases are not isolated to those abusing these drugs, but rather include everyone in order to determine which group (responsible users versus addicts & dealers) a particular person falls into. Once this data is open to human interpretation, who knows if their findings are going to be just. Think about all of the innocent people that find themselves on a watch list or no fly list due to human error.

It's not really as cut and dry as people would like to think.

Personally, my freedom and the freedom of every law-abiding citizen of this country is far more important than the few that try and spoil the whole bunch. Much like outlawing guns, marijuana, etc., I feel that the good, honest people are being unfairly punished and unfairly having their rights removed in the hopes of eradicating all the "evil-doers". Problem: You can never, no matter how many freedoms you remove, get rid of those that wish to do themselves and others harm. It is a problem in all countries -- dictatorships, democracies, monarchies, etc.

No matter how many databases we create, all to the tune of millions and millions of taxpayer dollars, we are going to be left with the same problems. The people that make money form selling these drugs have plenty of funds to bankrolls alternative methods to obtaining drugs -- database or not. From there, we will need more sophisticated databases requiring more millions to maintain.

Where, exactly, does it end?



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 11:24 AM
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Originally posted by lpowell0627
The problem with programs such as this, the database, is that it is seemingly a good thing. I mean, who doesn't want to stop drug dealers and addicts from being able to obtain a constant supply of drugs from so called "pill mills".



Me


I couldnt care less who gets high and where they get it from. I do care about MY freedom .....which means I must care about EVERYONES freedom, because they rarely steal from us all at once, they do it in small bites.



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 11:28 AM
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I certainly wouldn't want my name on any prescription drug database accessable by civil servants like the dickheads who work at the DMV . If a database is a must then the drug dealers (big pharma) should be paying for it as they are the ones doing the harm . I'd still be against it . I would mind a single searchable database of citizens abused by the ATF or the Patriot Act or thugs of the local and state police departments , something useful . I wouldn't mind a single database of the pay and bonuses of the Wall Street banksters and oil company executives . If i need an antibiotic , a pain killer or prescription hemmeroid cream it's no ones business but i'm sure it's already on a Motherland , Fatherland , Homeland Security file somewhere . Communist Soviet Union was the Motherland while Nazi Germany was the Fatherland and now we have Homeland that keeps the same files for future refrence on us suspects . Try to get insurance if an insurance company has access to any database and finds out you were on any prescription medication for any illness or condition , and they'll get the database . The only protection is not being on a database .



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 11:35 AM
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First of all, I want to say I do not agree with doctors giving large amounts of narcotics to anyone who wants them, but the government has way to much control over this matter, I have severe pain daily, from a couple of accidents, and physical abuse, and I am forced to take way to many OTC medications, and has resulted in destroying the lining of my stomach, I need something stronger so I don't have to take as much, but the second I say the word pain to a doctor, they stop listening to anything else I have to say, instead of treating me as an individual, with individual problems, they label me as a pill seeker and dismiss my concerns, but I have to wonder, is it because they fear prosecution and revocation of their medical license? I DONT THINK A MEDICAL ISSUE SHOULD BE MADE CRIMNAL!!!



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 11:42 AM
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www.bizjournals.com...

Focus on cracking down on the doctors who are the real criminals here. Take their liscenses and their assets. They are the drug cartels of America. Under the guise of physicians. This is big money we're talking about here.

I saw the mansions and automobiles these doctors and those related had that were confiscated, it's unreal.
As far as I'm concerned as a doctor you are a business, with strict regulations. Monitor them...not us.



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 11:44 AM
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STAR for all above my first reply, well said!



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 11:45 AM
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We're going through this is Georgia as well (here). In and of itself, this kind of legislation and/or database, while maybe well-intentioned, opens us up to too many potential abuses and too many "easy" violations of privacy with insurance companies, with law enforcement, with potential employers, and well you all know the drill.

They are trying to build in safeties, but we all know how that goes too. Everything's peachy until some analyst takes home the data on a laptop or until some brainiac with some other unforeseen use or abuse comes along. Sounds like it's a matter of $$$ to a degree there too, based on Scott's comments. Here, if the law passes, it won't be implemented till funding can be found.

As for Scott or any politician? Meh...they can be totally on target with one thing and totally off with twenty others, so in this case, yes, seems like he's on the right track (but again it's probably as much $$$ as invasion of privacy. On a case-by-case evaluation? Remains to be seen. Politicians need to prove themselves everyday. Just like anyone else.



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 11:50 AM
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Originally posted by lastrebel

Originally posted by lpowell0627
The problem with programs such as this, the database, is that it is seemingly a good thing. I mean, who doesn't want to stop drug dealers and addicts from being able to obtain a constant supply of drugs from so called "pill mills".


I couldnt care less who gets high and where they get it from. I do care about MY freedom .....which means I must care about EVERYONES freedom, because they rarely steal from us all at once, they do it in small bites.


You may not care about who gets high, but you certainly care about paying for the programs to get them clean, no? That's where the argument of "which costs more" comes into play. Is it cheaper to fund all of these databases or is it cheaper to pay for the rehabilitation programs, jail stints, prosecutions, etc? The latter already being funded by you and me -- the taxpayer of course. I look at this and say -- why should I pay for both? While others will argue that in the long run one will make the other more obsolete. Here we begin to delve into partisan ideals which I like to avoid.

Personally, to me, freedom is priceless. Freedom is also something that once given away can not easily be won back.

As I said, I agree with you and oppose these databases and all other programs that infringe on my rights. I just think people should be aware of the talking points and what ramifications often follow.



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 11:52 AM
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reply to post by lpowell0627
 


Why should we pay foir either?



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 11:53 AM
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reply to post by trustonlygod
 


The problem is not one usually one doctor prescribing hoardes of pills, but rather the people that doctor shop. Hence, the whole unifying database to eliminate that possibility.

Users and dealers go to one doctor, get a script, go to a pharmacy. Drive for two hours, go to another doctor, get another script, and head to another pharmacy. Currently, there is no database that tracks all of this. This legislation is an attempt to do just that.

However, I still oppose it.
edit on 25-2-2011 by lpowell0627 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 12:06 PM
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reply to post by lastrebel
 


That's a rather weighted question and my complete answer would be construed as off topic to the thread.

My short answer though is simply that we certainly can not eliminate tax payers from funding the justice & prison systems. On either a Federal or local level. We also can not say that we will only pay to prosecute people not involved in drugs.

As far as rehab, we pay for it for those unable to pay for it themselves and whether this is fair or not begins to open up whether or not tax payer funded entitlement programs should exist at all.

But I think you would be hard-pressed to find many willing to take the food out of a needy child's mouth or take away the only money a single mother has right now. These example are meant to tug at your heart strings solely for the fact that we can not begin to pick and choose what "type" of person should be eligible for these programs and not. Is a homeless drug addict less worthy of receiving a meal? Shelter? Medical treatment? Fair trial?

Personally, I think we should focus on getting back to the people that are actually, truly in need versus those that feed off of the system for life. I believe one of our biggest enemies is fraud. But as of right now, no matter how one got there, if you are in the "demographic" you get covered.



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 12:26 PM
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I honestly think the availability of OC here thwarts the establishment of a heavy heroin trade. It puts the power into the addicts hands more than if the only reasonable supply of opiates were to come from other nations. The problems always gonna be there.



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 04:25 PM
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The only reason they want to stop this is that a large amount of people who shop around for doctors aren't using the pills they are getting themselves. They sell them. I can't tell you how many people I know with a script for adderall who simply sell it because hey, when you're in college it's god damn useful.

Same with OC, same with Percs, same with any other drug sold through a prescription. People get them then sell the pills individually for much more than it costs them, costing the pharmaceutical companies money.

When are people going to realize that human beings like to get inebriated? Whether you drink booze, you down energy drinks for a caffeine buzz, you smoke a pack a day, smoke a blunt, blow a line, shoot up, drop acid, etc etc etc, people just like it. Some people don't like drugs so they get hooked on gambling, video games, sports and other activities which psychologically achieve similar results. It's hard grained into are system to seek something that brings us pleasure. Fighting against it is futile.

The only people who benefit from it are those making money from it.
edit on 25-2-2011 by SpectreDC because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 05:23 PM
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Originally posted by lpowell0627
reply to post by trustonlygod
 


The problem is not one usually one doctor prescribing hoardes of pills, but rather the people that doctor shop. Hence, the whole unifying database to eliminate that possibility.

Users and dealers go to one doctor, get a script, go to a pharmacy. Drive for two hours, go to another doctor, get another script, and head to another pharmacy. Currently, there is no database that tracks all of this. This legislation is an attempt to do just that.

However, I still oppose it.
edit on 25-2-2011 by lpowell0627 because: (no reason given)


This guy hit the nail on the head. I'm opposed to these databases personally, but I totally understand the "need" for them, if you could call it that.

It's not to track and harass anybody getting narcotics, it's simply for people that are doctor shopping. Which is why monitoring doctors does nothing. Legally you are supposed to tell your doctor if you are being subscribed narcotics by anybody else, if you don't, there is nothing they can do about it. Unless there is a database that shows you just picked up 120 80s the day before seeing him.

And it's not surprising that Florida senators are the ones pushing this, Florida was the OC mecca for awhile there, some doctors were giving out CRAZY amounts of OC to people with arthritis or nothing at all. You go it, pay for your visit, give the doc a few hundred dollars and he writes you whatever you want. Considering an 80mg oxy sells anywhere from $40-$80 a piece, a few hundred for a script of 240 is nothing. People were getting rich from this.

OC is a huge problem in the states. Purdue even released a new formula called "OP" that kind of has the consistency kind of little a skittle. This makes it close to impossible to snort or shoot, but people have still found ways of doing it.

Even so, I still don't support the databases.



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 07:28 PM
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If drug addiction were decriminalised, and turned into the actual medical problem it is, then the addicts would be abe to obtain perscriptions for them.
This in turn would allow access to these people for rehab and treatment.
The medical profession would then be able to actually deal with the whole problem instead of being stuck in the middle with no way of dealing with any of it.
The Police would be put back to work protecting and serving, and the addicts would no longer have to commit criminal acts for their fix.
How much less prostitution, robberies and other crimes would be eliminated that way?
The market for addictive drugs would suffer great price drops that would then make it impractical and non profitable to persue criminal activity in this direction......
The war on drugs fuels all the very worst that come from addictions.....
These data bases are for other purpose than stopping illegal trafficking.
edit on 25-2-2011 by stirling because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 11:26 AM
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reply to post by Misoir
 



while he was a millionaire businessman


I think he still is a millionaire businessman although it would be refreshing to see people who accept public office divested of personal wealth.

Now all his buddies in the pharmaceutical (drug pushing) industry needn't worry about losing the windfalls GWB "Senior Prescription Drug" plan gave them.

Too bad that and the war mongering bankrupted the country and increased the deficit dramatically but hey, we can blame it on the next guy.

To call Rick Scott a weasel would be maligning weasels.



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