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Earliest Human Remains Found in US Arctic Reported

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posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 09:51 PM
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I did a search for this topic on here but found nothing. Forgive me if it's already been posted and discussed. I just love these kind of discoveries. Something to ponder.

news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110224/ap_on_sc/us_sci_arctic_child

Just wanted to share as it is a very significant find.


While these bones represent the earliest human remains in the U.S. Arctic, there is evidence people had passed through Alaska earlier. Indeed, human DNA has been extracted from dried excrement deposited in caves in Oregon some 14,300 years ago and the well-known Clovis Culture flourished in parts of the United States 13,000 years ago.

edit on 24-2-2011 by OlympusMons because: Other evidence has been found, of course, but apparently not human remains in the U.S. Arctic. ???




posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 09:58 PM
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i love reading about this kind of stuff thank you. after reading the article i hope they are able to get the dna sample theyre hoping to get.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 10:02 PM
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Nice find! History is constantly being re-written every day.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 10:05 PM
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reply to post by subliminalsubconcious
 

Indeed. I hope they are able to as well. The Siberia connection they were able to gather from other factors is also a an interesting find. Further proof that early humans certainly migrated.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 10:17 PM
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The skull they've discovered in an underwater cave in Mexico is thought to be older;
Skull in Underwater Cave May Be Earliest Trace of First Americans (link to ATS thread), 15- 20,000 YBP, but that's not an official dating yet. Both obviously push back the origins of human migration to the Americas past the Clovis culture.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 10:17 PM
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Great read, S&F.

While I don't exactly concur with the mainstream view on early human migration patterns, this is a great read.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 10:23 PM
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This link gives a pretty good idea of what Alaska looked like at the time frame when these bones were deposited;

Paleoindians and the Great Pleistocene Die-Off
edit on 24-2-2011 by Blackmarketeer because: fixed link



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 10:29 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


What does prehistoric human pooh look like anyway and how do they recognize it to figure out if it human? I was rather puzzled by the idea that they found pooh and know it has berries in it and Donald Rumsfeld can't find trillions of U.S pentagon money. We need to get some archologist and paleontologist in the White house



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 10:32 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 

Thank you for that link, Black. Great stuff. I can't help but ponder that early humans did a lot of exploring. Crossing seas and oceans by following migratory birds and such. Who knows exactly who arrived from where first.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 10:56 PM
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reply to post by agentblue
 


What does prehistoric human pooh look like anyway and how do they recognize it to figure out if it human? I was rather puzzled by the idea that they found pooh and know it has berries in it and Donald Rumsfeld can't find trillions of U.S pentagon money. We need to get some archologist and paleontologist in the White house

Well chalk that up to archeologists knowing what they're doing and Donald Rumsfeld being a clueless jackal.



reply to post by OlympusMons
 

I think ancient humans were much more mobile then we tend to give them credit for, they had a good 40- 50,000 year stretch during the Pleistocene in which to migrate to the Americas, which they probably did in many waves hugging the coastlines, the Inuits would be a good example of such a lifestyle of Arctic/ice-age living in and around the water.



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 10:21 AM
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Originally posted by OlympusMons
reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 

Thank you for that link, Black. Great stuff. I can't help but ponder that early humans did a lot of exploring. Crossing seas and oceans by following migratory birds and such. Who knows exactly who arrived from where first.


Before they settled into being farmers of any consequence, they roamed at will or at least where the game went.
We sometimes have a problem imagineing those folks treking across continents. Why not? That was their way of self-improvement (looking for a better job!).



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 10:23 AM
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reply to post by OlympusMons
 


Great find S&F!




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