PC police reassign Tulsa police captain for not submitting to muslim dhimmitude

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posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 06:03 PM
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Coming to towns near us all. I used to catch all kinds of hell for not donating to United Way at work. They can't tell me who I can or can't give charity money too. I guess they can tell us all soon who we must submit to.


Capt. Paul Fields was reassigned after he refused to order officers under his command to attend the Islamic Center of Tulsa’s Law Enforcement Appreciation Day, a spokesman for the department said. “It is my opinion and that of my legal counsel that forcing me to enter a Mosque when it is not directly related to a police call for service is a violation of my Civil Rights,” Fields wrote in an internal police department memo obtained by Fox News. “I have no problem with officers attending on a voluntary basis; however, I take exception to requiring officers to attend this event,” Fields wrote in an e-mail to his superior officer obtained by Fox News. “I believe this directive to be an unlawful order, as it is in direct conflict with my personal religious convictions.”


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posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 06:07 PM
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its looking kind of like he was disobeying a direct order from a higher-ranking officer.

additionally, captains in most departments are expected to do PR stuff.

he's gonna have a tough time with this.




posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 06:13 PM
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reply to post by HoldTheBeans
 


too bad for Tulsa

sounds like a case for the $$$$courts to me



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 06:21 PM
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Sounds like a good cop for once to me..Standing against an unlawful order.....More of them should try it, they may like it....



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 06:32 PM
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reply to post by Caji316
 


They coulda sent somebody else or hey just not sent anybody. I'm sure CAIR will be calling for his job soon.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 06:34 PM
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So, Tulsa has a reception or something planned for National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day, and the mosque was chosen or volunteered to host this event? So this guy refused to "order" his officers to attend. Why? Would it have made a difference had it been held at a temple or cathedreal?

I don't get it........



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 06:41 PM
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Originally posted by windword
So, Tulsa has a reception or something planned for National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day, and the mosque was chosen or volunteered to host this event? So this guy refused to "order" his officers to attend. Why? Would it have made a difference had it been held at a temple or cathedreal?

I don't get it........


Read the link



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 06:42 PM
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After reading the op, and the actual article, it does raise several questions that should be asked and answers also need to be forthcoming. The question should be asked, if this had been an event for a Baptist or some other Christian church, would the same requirements have been placed on the police department and the captain? Were the officers who were to attend, and represent the police department, to be paid or done on their own time? And could it have been used to promote a healthy working relationship in a particular community? If this event was not religious in nature, then why was it to be held at a Mosque? And as part of the activities, that there would be presentations on beliefs, which is clearly religious in nature, along with watching a Muslim Prayer Service? Under that guise, it would be considered, as part of a religious event, and to ask people to show up, would not be correct. If the flyer also stated, that it is up to you, then it would indicate as being optional, and should not require that there be any sort of police presence.
The spokesman from CAIR is wrong in that aspect, as the choice to participate in a community outreach, is not governed by law, and stating such is not phobic in nature nor bias, it is a choice, that the Captain made. His words could have been chosen much more carefully, but it is his belief. Just cause a person works for the police, or is a teacher, or even a person on the street, or even a politician, does not mean that they are not entitled to their opinion, or belief. And tolerance needs to be a two way street, where the Islamic community demands tolerance, they should be equally tolerant towards other people. Compelling and ordering someone to be at a place, means that they would have to be paid to be there, or else it is a violation of their rights under the law.
Religious beliefs when it comes to the work place, should never enter into the workplace, unless it is a part of the workplace. That means that a person who works, in an establishment, that is highly religious, is expected to participate in the beliefs in that job. But when it comes to being a public official, or working in 99% of the jobs out there, then religion can not be a part of the workplace, as someone is going to be offended by something, and religion is too convenient of an excuse of not to do a job. Having a belief and being faithful is fine, when it is on a persons private time, but on the clock it is not. As with most groups that hold celebrations, they like to know that the police is there to support them, and a presence should be there, if nothing more than to foster good relations. As with other celebrations of this kind, it is usually on a voluntary basis, with the persons present in full uniform. Normally it is understood that the persons present are there to represent the public service sector and put it in a good light, as well as to foster good community relations. But it is never forced. Should it come to forcing a person to go to an event where they are not wanting to be, there is no guarantee that they will show up, or even give the respect that some of these event should require. The laws that are on the books, govern activity of the people, and there has never been a law that governs inactivity by anyone. This should remain constant and hopefully will clear up.
On a personal note, it is hoped that the Captain who was fired, does win his case of wrongful termination, along with possibly suing CAIR for defamation of character and slander, as there is no indication that the Captain is a bigot.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 06:48 PM
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I can understand some one like a captian are the office PR guy having to go, But to make a mandator order to the officers under him is wrong.As he said if they wanted to go on there own that would be fine. I believe we push the P.C. stuff a little to far some times.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 06:52 PM
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reply to post by sdcigarpig
 


He wasn't fired according the the article he was reassigned. To what it doesn't elaborate. I agree with your assessment. I don't know what part of being a police officer requires they attend any outreach forum in a church or anywhere else. If it was while they were on duty I'd be even more upset as they are not doing the job they are paid to do while sitting around listening to someones jibberish.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 07:01 PM
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Clearly, the captain is a bigot. It is the duty of the police to serve and protect ALL of the community. Including Muslims.

The article says that in addition to food, there was to be a presentation on belief, women and ? (don't remember), Well, that makes sense, a police department should be educated as to the culture of the people they serve and forming bonds with their leaders and getting to know the parents, kids etc.

His action sent the wrong message of hate and intolerance to those people.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 07:18 PM
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reply to post by windword
 





Clearly, the captain is a bigot.


im not sure that the captain is a bigot at all.




posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 07:18 PM
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reply to post by windword
 


If they were going to be having a Muslim parade or something, and he had been assigned to that to act in a "security" capacity and refused- then I would say yes, he was disobeying orders....
But this incident is ridiculous- it's just more PC Muslim-coddling....it's getting old.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 07:25 PM
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reply to post by windword
 


If this event was held at a park, then yes, it would be a controversy and he could be considered or at least the thoughts of being a bigot would be true. However, this event was held at a Mosque, a house of worship. One of the events would be on beliefs, and there was an opportunity for the police present to see a prayer activity. All of that would be indicating that of a religious nature. Thus the Captain, along with any who works in the public sector, when it is a voluntary event, the right to refuse to attend. If they were forced to attend, then it could be a violation of not only the right to the freedom of religion, but also of the state supporting a religion, which is against the law. A mosque, is a place of worship, it is where those who follow the Islamic faith, gather to worship and discuss things of a religious nature. It should not be a place to hold any community relations, and expect people to show up, as the question should be asked, what is wrong with a park, or a more public venue, rather than in a private setting? Most churches and places of worship, can be considered a private venue, where the person in charge, can ask or deny entry to anyone and be fully justified in their actions.
There is no indication or record of the captain, ever having refused to do his job, on the grounds of him hating or even being biased against a group of people on the grounds of religion, so that too is a very unfair statement.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 07:41 PM
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This event was planned in the honor of "law enforcement!' They should have been there, and I think if they HAD to be ordered, so be it. It was in their honor.

Again, it sends a message of intolerance and hatred. Islamaphobia is getting OLD! This is America, where we value the freedom of religion, and freedon from religion.

I'm against organized religion, but I would walk into a church if someone was having a function in my honor.
edit on 24-2-2011 by windword because: spelling



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 07:45 PM
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Originally posted by windword
Clearly, the captain is a bigot. It is the duty of the police to serve and protect ALL of the community. Including Muslims.

The article says that in addition to food, there was to be a presentation on belief, women and ? (don't remember), Well, that makes sense, a police department should be educated as to the culture of the people they serve and forming bonds with their leaders and getting to know the parents, kids etc.

His action sent the wrong message of hate and intolerance to those people.


How do you come to the conclusion he's a bigot? He wasn't ignoring the protection of anybody in the community. Educated in their culture?? This is the US. They should become educated with our culture. They don't like it they can leave at their leisure.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 07:46 PM
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Originally posted by sdcigarpig
reply to post by windword
 


If this event was held at a park, then yes, it would be a controversy and he could be considered or at least the thoughts of being a bigot would be true. However, this event was held at a Mosque, a house of worship. One of the events would be on beliefs, and there was an opportunity for the police present to see a prayer activity. All of that would be indicating that of a religious nature. Thus the Captain, along with any who works in the public sector, when it is a voluntary event, the right to refuse to attend. If they were forced to attend, then it could be a violation of not only the right to the freedom of religion, but also of the state supporting a religion, which is against the law. A mosque, is a place of worship, it is where those who follow the Islamic faith, gather to worship and discuss things of a religious nature. It should not be a place to hold any community relations, and expect people to show up, as the question should be asked, what is wrong with a park, or a more public venue, rather than in a private setting? Most churches and places of worship, can be considered a private venue, where the person in charge, can ask or deny entry to anyone and be fully justified in their actions.
There is no indication or record of the captain, ever having refused to do his job, on the grounds of him hating or even being biased against a group of people on the grounds of religion, so that too is a very unfair statement.


That's odd? Last time I voted, the polling place was in a church. Churches hold community events all the time, that are not preaching events. This was not an attempt to convert the officers, but to invite them into their community. An important relationship to have inlight of the captain's obvious bigotry.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 07:54 PM
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YOu keep accusing this man of bigotry with no claims to back it up.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 07:57 PM
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Originally posted by sdcigarpig
reply to post by windword
 


There is no indication or record of the captain, ever having refused to do his job, on the grounds of him hating or even being biased against a group of people on the grounds of religion, so that too is a very unfair statement.


This is the officer said in the interveiw; “I believe this directive to be an unlawful order, as it is in direct conflict with my personal religious convictions" Entering a mosque is against his religion? What if a crime was being committed there? He would go in, do his job?

This was an ORDER to participate in an event that thrown in the honor the officers, and in an effort to build community relations. It was his duty to attend.

Religion is between you and your god, politics has no place in the insideous example of islamophobia and a statement of bigotry!

IMHO



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 08:05 PM
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LOL islamophobia. Do you work for CAIR or something?

What crime was being prevented that he didn't go stop? Your claims are asinine.





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