It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Official secret act (uk)

page: 1
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 02:08 PM
link   
Last year I had to sign the official secrets act (not that I found out any official secrets
) for a job I was working for.

When I signed it I also had to hand over a passport photo.

I was wondering which part of the govenment recieves my signature and photo and what they do with them.

I've tried researching it on the internet but I have come to naught so I am hoping someone on here might have a better idea.




posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 02:18 PM
link   
I'm in the army and I'm bound by the official secrets act and I'm also vetted to top secret and I know it will just be filed so they can bang you to rights if need be hope that helps

It's a long read but it might help.
www.legislation.gov.uk...
edit on 24/2/11 by simples because: Added link



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 02:21 PM
link   
I'm a member of ATS and I'm bound by the official ATS secrets act so i can't tell you.sorry

edit on 24-2-2011 by audio assasin because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 02:29 PM
link   
reply to post by monkofmimir
 


Same here. If I told you what I know, I'd have to kill you


Obtaining a passport photo is standard protocol for the UK civil service (if that's who you joined or were contracted to) - they tend to use it for basic ID purposes. For example, making certain that the person who attended an interview is the person who turns up for work on the first day etc.

As far as I'm aware, it's as innocuous as that.

Edit to add: They don't acquire updated pictures throughout your service, which suggests they only need a photo for the start of your contract.
edit on 24/2/11 by lizziejayne because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 02:36 PM
link   
reply to post by monkofmimir
 


it's just in case you chirp and they get wind of it..

in a dark dark jail
where they stab you with a nail
and they draw funny pictures on the walls
where your hair grows thick
from your belly to your dick
and the mice play billiards
with yer balls.


i signed osa 25+ years ago, it is standard practice if your work involves any connection to defence/government systems.
regards f



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 03:37 PM
link   
MI5

Scanned and filed.

God help you if you break the act.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 03:38 PM
link   

Originally posted by neformore
MI5

Scanned and filed.

God help you if you break the act.


Care to elaborate?

I'm curious.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 03:41 PM
link   
reply to post by mr-lizard
 


Just that you'll have the full weight of the establishment thrown at you, have just about every single thing in your life investigated, and be very lucky not to come away without some form of conviction - if not for breaking the act, then for something else you may have done previously.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 04:08 PM
link   
Happily I know no govenment secrets so even if I wanted to break it I couldn't.

I was just figuring it was was sent to a database and I was wondering who ran the database.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 05:04 PM
link   
reply to post by neformore
 


By admitting you've signed it, you've broken it!



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 05:13 PM
link   
reply to post by Rob37n
 


if thats so I wasn't told so when I signed it

edit on 24-2-2011 by monkofmimir because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 05:29 AM
link   
reply to post by Rob37n
 

i'll wait for the knock on the door and the 'you've been a very very naughty boy' routine. my response will be since i signed 25 years ago, it is now statute barred considering it should work both ways.
in a dark dark jail......
f



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 05:50 AM
link   
reply to post by monkofmimir
 


MoD Abbywood would sponser your application, which is then sent to York for vetting and approval. You file, once processed is retained there.



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 06:00 AM
link   
reply to post by monkofmimir
 


I hope the realisation of what you have signed has kicked in, you are bound for LIFE by that little card, Hope it was a good contract you signed, and also check if your included in the "military covenant", Can be quite useful when seeking Medical/housing issues.. Welcome to the "team" mucker...



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 06:28 AM
link   
I honestly don't ever remember doing photos in the early 80s (worked for the MoD then later the home office before moving on to BNF and BoE) nor do I actually remember doing the "official secrets" thingy.. tho the little background check seemed really annal as it went back to Grandparents place of birth, occupations, criminal records etc which was so painful to fill out, but it did open the door to working alongside some great guys in the service on some really interesting projects..



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 03:38 AM
link   
reply to post by fakedirt
 


That's how it works, if you break the act, and not knowing you've broken it isn't a valid defence, you are charged with breaking the act and not with the act you broke it with. That way when you're in court you are tried for that and they don't have to disclose what you did to end up in court.

The OSA works in weird and wonderful ways, so while it's not a offence to say they drink tea and eat biscuits at Cabinet meetings at Number 10, it is an offence to reveal the brand of tea and biscuits. It's sheer Kafkaesque madness, but they feel it works.



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 07:28 AM
link   
reply to post by Rob37n
 


within the scope of my tenureship, i have immunity from risk assessments and
method statements due to the sensitive nature of the work. no information
is logged to the extent that it is described. no personell are allowed to
be in the vicinity and the work is strictly carried out with backs turned if there
are individuals present. it is always amusing to see project overseers scratch
their heads, make calls and then close the file.
the vetting system is quite effective and i know of two occasions where the head sheds
have attempted to test my resolve. it has been an enjoyable experience to have the
nods of approval even though i myself did not doubt for one second my own loyalty.the
overall majority of mod personell are good eggs save for a few jobsworths who have
attempted and failed at superceding my resolve.compartmentalisation has its merits.
my work will never be described to anyone not even the missus. she just knows not
to ask.
btw the statute barr statement was to see if anyone was on the ball.we are duty bound
till death with that little number.
regards f



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 04:01 PM
link   
reply to post by fakedirt
 


Problems arise as did for one worker at Area 51, he contracted something hideous but couldn't find out the materials to which he'd been exposed as it would violate security. That's insanely dangerous for workers. I hope you aren't being exposed to similar risks.



posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 05:31 AM
link   
reply to post by Rob37n
 


i am aware of a number of personell who contracted illnesses from materials of a highly toxic nature and of the problems they faced in attempting to get this recognised. i personally know of individuals who disregarded health and safety protocols through sheer stupidity and now suffer as a result. i myself have an extensive stock of safety kit which i use in appropriate environments. a set of eyes in the back of the head would be useful now and then!
regards f



posted on Mar, 1 2011 @ 01:16 PM
link   
reply to post by monkofmimir
 


Actually the official secrets act just doesn't cover government secrets, it also covers anything to do with security so ie if you worked in a controlled government building or army camp just telling people the layouts, how many people are there and even right down to how many are employed in the cafe you are breaking the official secrets act.



new topics

top topics



 
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join