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Christchurch Volcanic Eruption Looms

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posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 06:00 AM
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Originally posted by Elliot
www.earth-issues.com...

Hasn't the Tasman sea bed risesn by 2 miles in the last few days?

No it hasn't.

The buoy which measures changes in the ocean floor was raised for maintenance.
This is interpreted by the sensors as the ocean floor rising.


Originally posted by Phage

The life cycle of a deployed tsunami buoy is approximately 2 to 4 years. The Bureau's maintenance regime will involve the replacement of the surface buoy and the sea-floor pressure sensor every one to two years. The devices retrieved during regular maintenance are refurbished and made ready for the next redeployment.

www.bom.gov.au...




posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 06:11 AM
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There are no active volcanoes in the South Island.

Mt Cook is not a volcano, it never was a volcano.


The Southern Alps on the South Island were formed by tectonic uplifting and pressure as the Pacific and Indo-Australian Plates collided along the island's western coast. The uplifting continues, raising Aoraki / Mount Cook an average of 7 millimetres (0.28 in) each year. However, erosive forces are also powerful shapers of the mountains. The severe weather is due to the mountain's jutting into powerful westerly winds of the Roaring Forties which run around approximately 45°S latitude, south of both Africa and Australia. The Southern Alps are the first obstacle the winds encounter after South Africa and Australia, having moved east across the Southern Ocean.

The height of Aoraki / Mount Cook was established in 1881 by G. J. Roberts (from the west side) and in 1889 by T. N. Brodrick (from the Canterbury side). Their measurements agreed closely at 12,349 feet (3,764 m). The height was reduced by 10 metres (33 ft) when approximately 10 million cubic metres of rock and ice fell off the northern peak on 14 December 1991.


And lastly, predictions from a person who does not know volcanoes can go permanently extinct are worth as much as the brown markings on toilet paper.

(Some volcanoes, because of tectonic plate movement, have moved so they are permanently separated from their lava supply.)



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 06:14 AM
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reply to post by Kailassa
 


When I was a kid ruapehu wasnt an active volcano it was known to be the 'extinct' one until it blew it's top. I still remember seeing the ash cloud rising outa the volcano like it was yesterday - I don't think their is such thing as an inactive volcano - just ones that have been sleeping a long time - doesnt mean it cant change overnight.



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 06:34 AM
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reply to post by byteshertz
 


It depends on the type of volcano.
With many you can never be 100% certain.
But some rise because of the lava under them, and then are pushed by plate movement away from the lava source. This type end up thoroughly extinct.



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 06:46 AM
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reply to post by Kailassa
 


Smack talk from someone who doesn't understand why subduction zone volcanoes are never extinct, doesn't bother me much. Watch out people, we've got a wikipedia expert. I never claimed to be a volcanologist, but i've studied this stuff for years, how about you?
edit on 25-2-2011 by Tephra because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 03:40 PM
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reply to post by byteshertz
 


Wrong, Mt Ruapehu is one of the Worlds most Active Volcanoes and has been throughout your lifetime and has been since humanity began.




In recorded history, major eruptions have been about 50 years apart,[1] in 1895, 1945 and 1995–1996. Minor eruptions are frequent, with at least 60 since 1945. Some of the minor eruptions in the 1970s generated small ash falls and lahars (mudflows) that damaged skifields


en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 05:14 PM
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reply to post by grantbeed
 


Correct, I've been around since the late 1950s and it's always been active.



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 07:59 PM
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Originally posted by byteshertz
reply to post by Kailassa
 


When I was a kid ruapehu wasnt an active volcano it was known to be the 'extinct' one until it blew it's top. I still remember seeing the ash cloud rising outa the volcano like it was yesterday - I don't think their is such thing as an inactive volcano - just ones that have been sleeping a long time - doesnt mean it cant change overnight.


how is this statement wrong?
when they were a kid in their world that volcano was known as extinct.

seriously all the you're WRONG I'm right posts popping up lately, show some true character here on ATS



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 08:02 PM
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reply to post by -W1LL
 





when they were a kid in their world that volcano was known as extinct


No it wasn't extinct, it just maybe hadn't erupted during a certain timeframe, that does not mean it's extinct!



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 08:28 PM
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Originally posted by Tephra
reply to post by Kailassa
 

Smack talk from someone who doesn't understand why subduction zone volcanoes are never extinct, doesn't bother me much. Watch out people, we've got a wikipedia expert. I never claimed to be a volcanologist, but i've studied this stuff for years, how about you?




Originally posted by Tephra
There is no such thing as an inactive volcano, this is where I stand on the debate in volcanology

Have you managed to learn in the meantime that not all volcanoes are subduction volcanoes?
Congratulations, you might be getting somewhere.



Originally posted by Tephra
The most dangerous volcano, probably being Mount Cook, which could cause massive destruction.

Have you learned yet that Mount Cook is not a volcano?


It's quite funny, you resorting to ad hominems. If I'm a "wikipedia expert" and can see the falsity of your claims straight off, what does that say about you?

Besides, I found the source of your "study" right here.
This was first posted about mount Cook in the thread on the Christchurch earthquake:

Originally posted by CAELENIUM
My prediction is that when "Mount Cook" does erupt it is going to be a massive event with pyroclastic destruction over an one hundred kilometer radius. With very considerable amounts of ash being ejected.

You even copied his/her picture, which has Mount Cook circled as a volcano, without attribution.

I recommend actually learning about a subject instead of parroting an inaccurate post in an effort to scare earthquake victims out of their homes forever.



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 09:08 PM
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Originally posted by grantbeed
reply to post by -W1LL
 





when they were a kid in their world that volcano was known as extinct


No it wasn't extinct, it just maybe hadn't erupted during a certain timeframe, that does not mean it's extinct!



wow interpretations are wonderful mysterious things arent they?

how does "known as extinct" get translated to a Fact the volcano is extinct.
not only that in the next sentence they say the obvious that it is not hence the phrase blowing its top I think the poster knew it was not extinct. wowzers



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 09:50 PM
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reply to post by Kailassa
 


I have never seen, read, or copied anything from that that user. I credited the image (that user didn't), perhaps reading is not your strong suit. Clearly this user came to similar conclusions, this tends to happen when something is clearly happening.

I can see you have a clear vendetta to troll this thread looking for semantical arguments. Enjoy.

edit on 25-2-2011 by Tephra because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2011 @ 09:59 PM
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Originally posted by Elliot
www.earth-issues.com...

Hasn't the Tasman sea bed risesn by 2 miles in the last few days?

Isn't this what usually happens just before a volcano errupts?

Something has been going on with regard to that particular earth plate as there is speculation that Indonesia is sinking and maybe a huge volcano is raising that is New Zealand itself. Maybe evacuation should be considered and very soon.


Forgive me if I am wrong, but wouldn't the sea bed rising by 2 miles (2miles????) cause an ENORMOUS Tsunami?

I have looked at your link, but it doesn't really put those graphs into any context. I find it hard to believe the sea bed could rise by 2 miles and no one notices.



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 12:47 AM
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reply to post by stumason
 

There was a thread about it a few weeks back - a badly researched thread based on a blog.

Phage stopped by and showed the buoy concerned had been raised for maintenance, and that had caused the sensors to give a funny reading.



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 04:49 AM
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Originally posted by Tephra
reply to post by Kailassa
 

I have never seen, read, or copied anything from that that user. I credited the image (that user didn't), perhaps reading is not your strong suit. Clearly this user came to similar conclusions, this tends to happen when something is clearly happening.


This also tends to happen when multiple gullible people use a sensationalist viral email as their source.


I can see you have a clear vendetta to troll this thread looking for semantical arguments. Enjoy.

No. I just don't like seeing lies spread.



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 06:00 AM
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Originally posted by SunSword
reply to post by Tephra
 
Good job well researched and organized! Flagged and starred.




No it wasn't.



Originally posted by Tephra
The most dangerous volcano, probably being Mount Cook, which could cause massive destruction. Luckily the swarm isn't super close to Mount Cook. There is also a possibility however of a major volcano off the coast of the Banks peninsula.







This is good:
www.sciencedirect.com... fmt=high&_orig=search&_origin=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1656967302&_rerunOrigin=google&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0& _userid=10&md5=e5b84199c9ba766993d45b4a9279bbef&searchtype=a

It's not a subduction zone volcano, it was a hotspot zone. That has since migrated. The 'hot springs' are due to the geothermal gradient. There is no imminent eruption, nor will there be.


Keep up the good work, Kailassa.

edit on 26-2-2011 by aorAki because: ?



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 12:36 PM
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Hot Springs have more to do with "Hot Spots" than impending volcanic eruptions.
There are Hot Springs all over New Zealand, not just where there are volcanos.
In fact there are Hot Springs in many places around the World you wouldn't think of
en.wikipedia.org...

Hot Springs are not always close to volcanic activity.

Red Herring I'm afraid


If OP did some research they would know that when a volcano is getting ready to erupt the earthquakes are at the rate of hundreds per hour, not 57-107 per day as has been happening on the Halswell - Taylors Mistake Fault after the 6.3 quake.



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 05:18 PM
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Found an interesting article regarding the possibility of a volcanic eruption in Christchurch and thought I would offer it up for discussion in this thread.


Engineer concurs - Christchurch could be headed for volcanic eruption

Subduction-zone volcanoes never go extinct, only dormant
Includes cities of Timaru, Oamaru and Dunedin


I concur with Neil Love about the possibility of the Christchurch volcanoes becoming active. New Zealand in general and the South Island especially sits astride a subduction zone where the sea floor on the west side is pushing under the sea floor on the east side causing uplift. The result of this uplift is the Southern Alps.


Source: www.iceagenow.com...
Note: There is also another link on this page that includes further explanation and some pictures.

The above was in response to this article also posted on this site:


...Banks Peninsula, just south of Christchurch, consists of two overlapping extinct volcanoes, the Lyttelton Volcano and the Akaroa Volcano.

Since the last eruptive activity some six million years ago, the volcanoes have been heavily eroded, dropping them from a peak of 1,500 meters down to around 500 meters.


Note: These are not my words and may be construed as fear-mongering. I apologize in advance.


I am worried that the situation in Christchurch is going to be even more destructive than it is already. I see it as being a large volcanic eruption coming on. Perhaps these two picture can give viewers a better comprehension of what is developing. In my opinion the NZ government should completely evacuate Christchurch and just leave it empty. I say this because when the volcano "Mount Cook" explodes it is going to kill everyone and flatten everything within a 100 kilometer range of it.
Neil Love, British Isles


Source: www.iceagenow.com...

The first quote was from Paul Fazey, Senior Reconciliation Engineer.

The second was from Neil Love, a guy from the British Isles that has posted this same "warning" on a number of sites. I haven't found any significant information about him by doing a quick search. Leads me to believe that he may not carry much credibility.

Nonetheless, we are certainly not the only ones wondering if a volcanic eruption is in the works...

As for my personal opinion, I think it's a bunch of fear-mongering obviously spreading the Internet. As I mentioned, this same guy, with no credentials that I can find, has posted this same article on a number of sites, David Icke for one.

This seems to be merely bad information spreading like wildfire.










edit on 26-2-2011 by lpowell0627 because: to add my opinion.



posted on Feb, 26 2011 @ 10:38 PM
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I read that and it was really bad and I wouldn't pay it any mind.
For starters,where the Southern Alps are the Plate Boundary is Strike Slip (up to 480km of lateral movement), Mount Cook (Aoraki) is not a volcano and the hotspot isn't under the Banks Peninsula Volcanic Field any longer.
edit on 26-2-2011 by aorAki because: speelinh



posted on Mar, 2 2011 @ 05:37 PM
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Originally posted by Tephra
reply to post by grantbeed
 




Originally posted by Tephra Subduction zone volcanoes are especially dangerous because while they appear extinct at times, they are actually just dormant.


Reading is good!

There is no such thing as an inactive volcano, this is where I stand on the debate in volcanology, the classification of an inactive volcano being such a ridiculously short time span, only a human could think in such a frame.

Look, the reality is, we discover whole volcanic ranges pretty often. There is truly much yet to be learned. There are fault lines we have no clue about. Our magnetic field strength diminishing is causing increased volcanic and tectonic activity.

You can call me whatever you want. But don't pretend that I'm some kind of ATS doomsday caller. This is my only thread, and not once did I tell people to run for their lives, EVACUATE NOW!!! The thread is a very valid potentiality from a scientific perspective. It's always easy to deny the possibility of it. Perhaps you should look on a map. It's called the pacific ring of fire, I'll give you a hint, you're in it.
edit on 25-2-2011 by Tephra because: (no reason given)


Yes, there is no such thing as an inactive Volcano, and with the Pole Shift thats starting up, all volcanoes will be active...




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