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Found abandoned septic tank in my back yard

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posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 09:33 AM
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reply to post by Wetpaint72
 


No way!

You should make the landlord crush the old tank and fill in the hole with dirt, so that there is no danger of a kid or animal falling into it, but it would be impossible to clean up enough to survive in. Concrete encasements are cheap, so if you want a shelter, just bury a new clean one, it would be cheaper than all the necessary chemicals and cleaners to make that one liveable.




posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 09:35 AM
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Ah, I did not see the part where you said it is concrete. .
edit on 22-2-2011 by antar because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 09:36 AM
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There is another reason to not pump the water out! It's holding the tank in place. If you remove the water, it could have the tendency to shift up and down. Our house was converted to natural gas from heating oil and we have a tank in the backyard, full about 1/2 way. We've never really checked it (it was done before we bought the house about 27 years ago), but a neighbor had their's completely emptied and it shifted due to ground heave. Over the course of a couple of winters, they had to dig it out. That's big money.
Especially if you are a renter.



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 09:48 AM
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WELL by the smell u sure is a septic,if is a concrete one is very very old and weak,the composition of the concrete have change over time[bacteria and gases], in other words there will be no cleaning or desinfectant enough to make it a shelter.



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 09:57 AM
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reply to post by stars15k
 


Thanks for the heads up. Definitely something one would want to know ahead of time. I think I will just start simply, by finding out a little bit about the water that is inside the tank with a few tests. Luckily my landloards are pretty cool. If I choose to do something they are ok as long as I tell them and take pics. But I would definitely seek professional assistance on this one.



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 10:02 AM
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Like I addressed already, are you absolutely sure that it's a septic tank? Can you see the tank? Does the concrete line the entire hole down or is it only at the bottom?

I also would like to know how deep this hole goes. Most septic tanks are only buried a few feet underground. If this is more than 3-4 feet, then you have a water well.

I honestly think that you ran across a water well. The water table in your area is too high for storm shelters I don't believe this is a shelter. I would have a sample of the water tested. If it comes back clean, then you could use this water for watering flowers or washing your car, and perhaps in a pinch, boil and sanitize it for consumption.



Peace be with you.

-truthseeker



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 10:03 AM
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Oh and another thing that struc me as odd...

The surface of the pipe or whatever it is, is only about 3 inches from the surface. Wouldn't septic tanks be deeper than that?

I think I shall go outside and investigate a little further.
edit on 22-2-2011 by Wetpaint72 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 10:16 AM
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Originally posted by Wetpaint72
Oh and another thing that struc me as odd...

The surface of the pipe or whatever it is, is only about 6 inches from the surface. Wouldn't septic tanks be deeper than that?

I think I shall go outside and investigate a little further.


Trace this pipe. If it leads back to the house, check the basement. If you find a capped off pipe, then you probably have a water well. I know I keep saying this, but it could be important in a survival situation. I know a lot about this stuff since I live in a rural area just outside of my city. We have sewer service (which is a very recent thing....we got it about 15 years ago), but we have well water. Most septic tanks are buried anywhere from 18-24 inches under the ground (that would be the top edge of the tank). Up this way it has to be deeper to stay below the frost line. Trace the pipe, and let me know. I have some ideas about how you can utilize that water if it indeed is a well.



Peace be with you.

-truthseeker



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 10:17 AM
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An old septic tank?
Gross!!



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 10:24 AM
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Originally posted by macman
An old septic tank?
Gross!!


Or an old water well.



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 10:25 AM
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Hello Wetpaint72
I had an old hole on my property like that with 2 stones over the top then under that was a cement like cap over the top it was a old septic tank with a bit of water in it i wouldn't use that for anything..Plus i would tell my landlord about it by law those old tanks should be filled in with dirt because there dangerous they settle over the years and fall in so i was told by the sewer man..So i had dirt brought in and had it filled in..Please don't use that nasty thing...



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 10:32 AM
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Originally posted by autowrench
reply to post by Wetpaint72
 


I believe what you found is called a Cistern. In the days before city water and electricity everyone had one, they would collect rain water.


Looks like a perfect starting point for your own wine making enterprise! Great in the survival scenario.



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 10:36 AM
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I forgot to add that mine had old silo blocks that went from the top to the bottom...and the hole was fairly deep..also mine had old metal pipes that ran down over a hill to drain the water and yuck from the tank those are still in the ground...



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 10:40 AM
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reply to post by truthseeker1984
 


Do you mind if I keep responding to you. I am very interested in what you have to say. And the more I hear and the more I investigate I am thinking that it is truly something else.
1. I do not have a basement and I can't find an end to the pipe in the " house" end.
2. The whole top seems to be concrete for sure, and the rest is too...I think.
3. The hole in the top isn't a purposeful hole. It seems to be a broken out chunk of concrete.
4. This hole is no mort than 3 feet from the edge of the house.
5. I poked down in the sand and it seems square and quite large. Next time I go out I will try to find the ends and get a better estimate of overall measurement.



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 10:49 AM
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reply to post by Wetpaint72
 


Are you sure its septic?

Around here, midwest, there are old water "systerns"sp? that were made from some form of early cement/creek gravel from around the turn of the century 1900 some say civil war camps....and when left un attended turn into something similar to a stagnet pond, and if uncovered usually have many dead decaying animals in there, from mice to snakes deer coons...depending on your location.

I did read about a septic tank in Las Vegas back around 1999, maybe 1997 where some lucky home owner dug it up and found billions of dollars of stashed real silver dollars in it.....It was $$$$ Binions Casino was hiding, and was rumored to be part oh his suspicious death...I believe it to be officially labled suicide by OD....but was hotly debated.



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 10:54 AM
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reply to post by Doc Holiday
 


Trying to figure out that now...wether it is a septic or not. Maybe worth the big dig up after all eh...well if I find billions I'll split it with ya. Lol



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 11:50 AM
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reply to post by Wetpaint72
 


Rabbit Hole, slang term.

To get an idea, this type of structure was used in England durring WW2 for residential bomb protection.

In England the resident would dig down a couple of feet then take Corrugated steel bend it 180 degrees placing each end on the side of the trench, then cover with earth.

Worked very well except for collecting water in the trench. Could withstand relatively close blast. Not a direct hit.

Improve the design by no trench so water does not collect, but now you must strengthen the frame by replacing the steel with concrete. Still MUST be covered by soil or rock. Stay away from SQUARE pipe not as strong as circular. As you probably know a circular design disperses the force around the perimeter where square must absorb the impact.

Find a manufacture of these type of pipe in your area by there customers, these pipes are used as sewer pipe for large systems. These pipes come in several sizes, but 48 inch diameter by 48 inch long or better will do, three put together will give 12 feet shelter.

Another option is using corrugated steel culvert, this is cheaper, but not as strong, but will withstand most everything, will need to use more soil to increase its strength.



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 01:31 PM
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reply to post by Wetpaint72
 


Now that you have described it more, it's got me puzzled as well. It doesn't sound like a septic tank at all, and now it certainly doesn't sound like a well. I would have your landlord contact someone to dig this sucker up.....do you think you could take pictures of it and post it on the thread?



Peace be with you.

-truthseeker



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 09:41 AM
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Anytime you have water and decaying vegitation in a stagnent area (like in old cisterns or septic tanks) you can get a build up of H2S gas. It colorless, odorless above 10ppm and very LEATHAL. 10-20 people a year die in the US from H2S.

I'd find someone professional to inspect it as they will have a gas monitor to check air quality prior to goign into it.



posted on Feb, 24 2011 @ 12:39 PM
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reply to post by exile1981
 


This is probably the best post on this thread. Before doing any inspection inside of the tank, get a O2/H2S/Nitrogen sensor. There is a very small tolerance for humans to survive with oxygen percentages. If memory serves me correct it is in the neighborhood of 19-21% O2 levels. If the levels are not safe enough, you should be pumping in air, through a duct and fan to ensure safety. Also having a buddy present in the event you are overcome by noxious gases is almost necessary.

H2S is no joking matter. It smells like rotten eggs, but that is the initial smell before your olfactory senses are deadened by H2S. So, in other words, if you smell rotten eggs and it goes away, you are not in a safe situation. Also H2S is a heavier than air, so it will collect in the "well" rather than be dispersed by air and whatnot.

Good luck though with your investigations with the hole in your backyard. Could be very interesting if it turns out to be a safe alternative to a bunker.



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