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Texas Quarter

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posted on Jul, 16 2004 @ 01:07 PM
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Who says Masonry is dead at different levels of Government? Take a look at the new Texas Quarter. Instead of the star being centered in the outline of Texas, it was placed towards the top. Over Waco, where the Texas Grand Lodge is.

Well, Texas is the daughter of Masonry.




posted on Jul, 16 2004 @ 01:19 PM
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Originally posted by nwscc
Who says Masonry is dead at different levels of Government? Take a look at the new Texas Quarter. Instead of the star being centered in the outline of Texas, it was placed towards the top. Over Waco, where the Texas Grand Lodge is.


Is the Texas Governor known to be a Mason? Beause the process for selecting the design (as seen here) says this:


From the U.S. Mint webpage:
On August 14, 2000, Governor George W. Bush appointed the 15-member Texas Quarter Dollar Coin Design Advisory Committee. The Committee authorized the Texas Numismatic Association to conduct a statewide design contest on its behalf. Nearly 2,600 candidate design concepts were submitted in response to a statewide contest. From those design concepts, 17 finalists were selected by the Texas Numismatic Association and presented to the Texas Quarter Dollar Coin Design Advisory Committee for review. The Committee further narrowed the submissions to the five designs that were most representative and emblematic of the State. Governor Rick Perry submitted the preferred design of the outline of Texas beneath the Lone Star and encircled by a lariat, which was approved by the Secretary of the Treasury on August 26, 2003.



posted on Jul, 16 2004 @ 01:21 PM
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Originally posted by nwscc
Who says Masonry is dead at different levels of Government? Take a look at the new Texas Quarter. Instead of the star being centered in the outline of Texas, it was placed towards the top. Over Waco, where the Texas Grand Lodge is.


Sure that's not Austin? Usually on the state Quarters the star represents the Capitol, but hey, I'm O.K. with the Grand Lodge as well. Not to mention the Grand Lodge of Texas is as impressive as some state capitol buildings.



posted on Jul, 16 2004 @ 01:43 PM
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He was a Skull and Bonesman in COLLEGE. Not the same thing at all...



posted on Jul, 16 2004 @ 01:46 PM
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Positive. I used to live in Austin. Placing the Star over Austin would have been putting it almost exactly in the center of the state outline.

I don't belive in coincidences.

The Grand Lodge of Texas is an awe inspiring edifice. Pictures don't do it justice.



posted on Jul, 16 2004 @ 01:50 PM
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Originally posted by theron dunn
He was a Skull and Bonesman in COLLEGE. Not the same thing at all...


I know Bush is not a Mason. I did not say that. But that does not preclude there are not any working in places of importance where descisions are made. Who chose which one to send to Bush for approval? You know how descisions are made. Sometimes pushing one a little harder that the rest gets things chosen.



posted on Jul, 16 2004 @ 01:52 PM
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Texas is, of course the "lone star" state.

they had to put the star somewhere, right.
I mean, people expect to see a blazing star when they see texas represented on a coin.

Are you saying that Texas was originally designed to be a masonic republic? Everyone knows that is just silly. The only reason those fellows acted up at the Alamo is so that the land could be annexed by the USA a dozen years after their deaths. Everyone knows that.



posted on Jul, 16 2004 @ 03:20 PM
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Originally posted by dr_strangecraft

Texas is, of course the "lone star" state.

they had to put the star somewhere, right.
I mean, people expect to see a blazing star when they see texas represented on a coin.

Are you saying that Texas was originally designed to be a masonic republic? Everyone knows that is just silly. The only reason those fellows acted up at the Alamo is so that the land could be annexed by the USA a dozen years after their deaths. Everyone knows that.


Every President Texas had was a Mason, every signer of the Texas constitution was a Mason. Quite a few Masons dies at the Alamo (Santa Anna was also Mason)

Don't quote Texas history to a Texan. Do some research and see the significance Masonry played in Texas history.

Texas was not annexed. We are the only State in the Union that can withdraw from the Union. We joined the United States. After the Civil War our constitution was the only one that was not ratified.

The Battle of the Alamo was for independance from Mexico, not so we could join the union.

[edit on 16-7-2004 by nwscc]



posted on Jul, 17 2004 @ 10:09 AM
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A fellow mason and a fellow texan. Seems the only thing you don't share with me is a sense of sarcasm.

I DO subscribe to the notion that Texas was originally intended to be THE Masonic Republic, as The United States had originally been as well. The three branches of US government, were, in my opinion, inspired by the Junior Warden (judicial), Senior Warden (legislative) and Worshipful Master (President).

The design started getting changed pretty Early on in America, particularly with the institution of the Bank of America, which unlike the present corporation, was a semi-private branch of the executive govt. In other words it was an early version of the Federal Reserve. Brother Andrew Jackson was busy trying to dismantle it at the same time the Texans were experimenting with independence. Hayden got it wrong; If Austin had merely wanted Texas annexed by the US, he probably would have supported Haydens Freedonian rebellion. But I believe that Austin and Houston both believed in something greater; it was people like Lamar who made a mess of things. . . .

[edit on 17-7-2004 by dr_strangecraft]



posted on Jul, 17 2004 @ 02:03 PM
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I was also joking about the Alamo: revisionists cannot explain why volunteers would be willing to basically offer up their lives for anything less than total independence. It's just like Breed's Hill (a.k.a Bunker Hill). People only fight that way for an Idea that matters more than life itself.

The revisionists have tried to argue that there was a silver hoard buried in the well at the Alamo, (it was removed BEFORE the battle, as archaeological excavations have demonstrated.) or that Santa Anna wouldn't let them surrender, which is also not true.

Several of them were adventurers; many had given up land in Tennesee to come to Texas, they could have gone back to the States as a number of other early immigrants did. But they chose to stay and fight for an ideal.

The only explanation is that they believed their actions were the best possible use of the life God had given them.



posted on Jul, 17 2004 @ 07:01 PM
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you have definately earned my respect dr_strangecraft. nice set of posts.
I do share your sarcasm, but not when it comes to Texas. lol

But, did you know that the moon falls under the jurisdiction of the Texas Grand Lodge?

www.tranquilitylodge2000.org...


[edit on 17-7-2004 by nwscc]



posted on Jul, 17 2004 @ 07:06 PM
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What part of Texas? Lavaca Lodge #36 here.

lvlodge131.org...

interesting list of name here.



posted on Jul, 17 2004 @ 09:35 PM
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I don't usually give out my particulars. Always worried about being tracked down and hunted like an animal. Who knows who these people are on the web, anyway? I treasure my netanonymity.

But I'll Send you a U2U.



posted on Apr, 30 2007 @ 08:21 AM
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Originally posted by nwscc
Positive. I used to live in Austin. Placing the Star over Austin would have been putting it almost exactly in the center of the state outline.

I don't belive in coincidences.

The Grand Lodge of Texas is an awe inspiring edifice. Pictures don't do it justice.


For someone who lives in Texas, you have a very poor geographical education and sense. The geographical center of Texas in not Austin; it is due north and due west of Austin, near Brady. I have an old map and atlas packed away somewhere which indicates the location, but is definitely not Austin.

I finally grabbed a Texas quarter and looked at the star on the state outline. The center of the star is definitely not over even the vicinity of Waco. Sure, some part of the star "covers" where Waco would be, but the centerpoint of the star is closer to Fort Worth, or some community very close to Fort Worth. Close examination of any map would confirm this.

Since the center of the star is not centered over Waco (home of the Grand Lodge of Texas?), I would say that the premise that the Masons had a hand in the design of the quarter is false.



posted on Apr, 30 2007 @ 04:49 PM
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ARg...

I hit Ctrl something and now my screens all screwed up, big fonts, huge zoomed in screen..


Anyways..

I don't know why, but this is the only thing the stuck out as important to me..



Texas was not annexed. We are the only State in the Union that can withdraw from the Union. We joined the United States. After the Civil War our constitution was the only one that was not ratified


This is actually a misconception..

Not that Texas wasn't ratified or anything, just that ANY state can actually withdraw from the Union because every state actually willingly joined the UNION -- all have their own constitutions .. kinda like mini nations .. in a union.. think of it perhaps like the EU which will eventually most likely end up like America..

Centralized power.

I know I know so many point out the civil war as proof you cannot "leave the union" .. but few question the legality of the Civil War.



My opinion on the topic -- No, the star is not over Waco.



posted on Apr, 30 2007 @ 10:35 PM
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The "Texas wasn't annexed" theory is espoused by Republic of Texas crackpots. Texas was in debt to its eyeballs and gave up a third of its territory

1) To appease the abolishonists who didn't want a slave state as large as the original area of Texas

2) As "payment" to the US for covering its debt

One of the "perks" or courtesies granted to Texas that I can think of off the top of my head is that the Texas flag can be flown at the same height as the US flag. All other flags have to be flown lower than the US flag, as far as I know.



posted on Apr, 30 2007 @ 10:40 PM
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The star is NOT centered over Austin, that is for sure. Waco is the only "big" city in that immediate area. It kind of all runs together at some point, and Austin is close by....

Being a Texan, one would expect that star to be over San Antonio. That is the "Heart of Texas" (unless you are from Mason, then you will try to claim that title for yourself as a Masonite...which is interesting in and of itself).

I wonder why they put the star over there?




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