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$100,000+ Salaries for School Teachers?

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posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:11 AM
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reply to post by AntiNWO
 


I'm not worried and I've done just fine in the private sector thank you very much. Private would not be under Government regulated control...that would defeat the purpose you seek, would it not? Yes, they can and do remove students for resons they see fit. They get money for their students like public schools, but still make their kids pay for things. So, no money would be saved by tax payers. In fact, tax payers would be paying for the private education of those who could afford it and any public education left would sink further into inequality.
What is needed is for education to stop being funded by Federal Government and for it to be returned to the control of the communities that want their children educated. Even at state level, you'd get more competition because people who cared even a little would try to live in states with a good education system. No Child Left Behind (Race to the Top) is all junk that doesn't produce anything except uniform failure.
Standardized tests don't prove who is doing good and who isn't...they only show how good someone is at teaching to those tests or cheating on them to boost test scores. When these private schools only except the best, hard working students they can get their hands on, of course they are going to "do better."
Public school classrooms take all students no matter what the ability level, behavioral problem, or work ethic in general and the teachers do their best to educate them. Sad thing is, what is being taught is being dumbed down as well as red tape and tons of paperwork being heaped on to teachers. Students are not getting the teaching down they use to and that would change a lot if the Federal Government wasn't in education matters.
Feel how you like about it all, but in the end we are all losing the same fight. What you seem to want won't make things better, period.




posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:15 AM
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Originally posted by pcrobotwolf

Originally posted by PlanterZ
Well, my mom is a second grade teacher and I think that all teachers deserve this pay. Teaching is a very tough and time consuming job and unless you've done it, or know someone who has done it, you never really know how much work goes into it. My mother is constantly working on lesson plans, grading papers, writing reports, coping with the stress factor that comes with the job.

I also believe that teaching is one of the most crucial jobs out there. Come on, what would you do without teachers? They deserve that salary.

By the way, teaching is a "highly skilled job".
edit on 20-2-2011 by PlanterZ because: (no reason given)
Really buddy second grade teachers have a hard time coming up with lesson plans. Lets be real here your mom is a glorified baby sitter at best my aunt makes 90 grand doing the same thing because she learned to work the system. First off its not an 8 hour day second you get the summer off and every holiday known to man. Plus they almost never work weekends! Not only that they have piss poor results to boot. Let me guess your mom got tenure and then got her masters bang 90 grand for life teaching kids how to spell 4 letter words and do basic math. While i will have to work for the next 10 years to get to 80 grand in the information security field and if one person get's a virus or the system goes down its my job. Then if i get my masters i might get up to 110 maybe but its wishful thinking and at anytime i could lose my job. Plus i will have to study all the time just to keep up with the tech coming out. But no your mom and her basic education masters should get 90 grand a year even if she is only teaching 7 year old's how to barely read and write.


You wouldn't last a week in a 2nd grade classroom. You think it's easy because you're looking from the outside in and make the assumption it would be easy. I won't bother to try and change your mind on that because you'll never know without doing, you'll only be able to scream about how easy it is from the sideline.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:21 AM
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Originally posted by g146541

Originally posted by macman
Go back to that, and I think society would be better.

Throws his hands up in surrender, this i cannot defend as i think it would turn out much brighter students.
Just one problem though, some of our modern parents don't know enough to cook their own meals yet alone teach a child.
But yeah home schooling would turn out, for the ones who did it much smarter people.


Doesn't that really depend on a lot of things, is it really that straightforward? It assumes the parent is aware of the curriculum and trained enough to not only say which page to read, but knows answers if the child questions.

It assumes at least one parent is at home during the day (assuming home schooling means more than a couple of hours break from the tv in the evening).

It assumes the parent can afford to purchase the necessary collateral required to teach. It also assumes the child will not be in anyway affected by not learning in a social environment with other children....

I've nothing against the thought of home schooling, but I do think the approach is simplified so much it doesn't really do justice to the effort required.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:22 AM
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reply to post by loves a conspiricy
 



My further education was in mechanical engineering...i had no use for any of it. The french classes never helped me make parts, the music classes didnt give me a fine eye for detail..etc etc

You see education as the greatest thing since sliced bread....i see it as a waste of time and money for the most part.


I do not see education as a waste of time. However I would prefer that schools taught different subjects, A lot more science (only general science - one year is required in the USA) Greek and Latin instead of Spanish and French. If you plan to go into chemistry or Bio you better take German.

I also tell kids who ask, not only get a college education but learn a trade. I will never forgive my Mom for not telling me her mechanic wanted to hire me during the summers. I miss not having the experience those four summers of hands on learning would have given me. Mom was protecting her little girl, but I still learned to do a tune up, oil change, brake job and rebuild a carburetor....



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:25 AM
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Originally posted by crimvelvet
reply to post by kozmo
 





If the teachers were truly interested in excellence in their profession, a fair amount of their collective bargaining power would be focused on those types of initiatives but they're not. If it were, then negotiating for better compensation would not be an issue and many of us would be happy to pony up. Until such time that the unions can demonstrate that they are in this for the improvement of the system, as opposed to their own bank accounts, then they can play on my heart-strings and ask for my support. But alas, they won't, which is why I have little to no sympathy.




Well said, The US school system USED to be very good. My Grandmother taught Latin. Dad took Latin and classical Greek in school. When was the last time you saw those languages taught in school??

Think you could pass 8th grade in 1895? Take a look at that exam and compare it to the crap that is taught now.


While Greek (I presume you mean classical?) and Latin language knowledge is to be admired..... it's not going to get you many jobs is it, apart from teaching the same? To all intents and purposes, they have been dead languages for many centuries, wouldn't learning Chinese, Japanese, French, German etc. be of more benefit?



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:40 AM
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Originally posted by ImaginaryReality1984
reply to post by intelinside451
 


Sorry but i think teachers deserve good pay. They are as essential as the police, nurses and doctors and I am not being reckless with my language here. When societies ahve access to good education you find that crime rates drop, attitudes often become more liberal and a countries individual economy can flourish.

I would rather have a teacher being paid 100,000 a year than a politician or civil servant.

They are basically a civil servant.
They are paid from tax funds.
The tax payer/voter has spoken and now the teachers and their unions are crying about it.
Lie, cheat and steal is what these teachers are promoting.
Lie. Call in sick, and go protest.
Cheat. Cheat the system by calling in sick, get some fake doctors excuses and go protest.
Steal. They still get paid. they aren't doing their job (teaching), they are out protesting.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:55 AM
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Teachers should make MORE than lawyers and bankers- and especially politicians.

Education is THE NUMBER ONE MOST IMPORTANT THING IN THE WORLD - to a FREE nation that would like future generations to REMAIN FREE.

BUT - what children receive in public schools today in the US is not what I would call an education. Like someone mentioned above, students these days are taught to be law-abiding sheep, nothing more.

The only reason I have a great education is because I taught myself everything I know. I questioned my teachers and even my college professors. I dared to think for myself instead of just repeating others' beliefs without question. THIS is what an education is - intelligently thinking for one's self. Very few teachers employed at the moment teach their students to question information, to think for themselves. Out of 12 years in grade school, I had ONE teacher who changed my life so much that I would not be who I am today without her. For what she has done for me, and I'm sure countless others, I don't think any $$$ amount could suffice. She deserves to be making a great salary, in my opinion!

It is simple to see the problems in our education system. I could fix them all in a single day if I were in charge. First - cut the fat at the top. No need to have 7 assistant superintendents. I remember the days when all you needed was one principal to keep the students in line. Second, MERIT BASED PAY!! It is insanity to pay a person for doing a horrible job - no matter what his profession. If you don't perform, get out of the way for someone who can! Third - the teachers union has got to go. I could write pages about why the union has to go, but some reasons can be summarized here: www.city-journal.org...

So ultimately, good teachers should be payed high salaries. Think about it. What could any of YOU do without your education? Think about this: what could we as a country do with a REAL education system (not the brainwashing, and status quo teaching that is done in schools today)? Until we fix our entitlement attitudes across the board, we are drastically failing the generations to come.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 11:23 AM
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reply to post by skull_bones
 




What we have in the US is not an "Educational System" is an "Indoctrination System".

How it works;

They take kids away from there parents in their formative years, for at least 5 days a week 8 hours a day from ages 5 to 18....



I agree with most of what you said except for the ages they now start with infants. The newest moves by the elite in removing the parent from their children is:

1. "Women's Liberation" see: How The Rockefellers Re-Engineered Women (And yes I know it is very slanted) The goal was twofold, have twice the population working for the Banksters to steal from while removing the family's influence in child rearing.

2. The "Politically Correct" stance that disciplining a child is child abuse. Heck you can not even FIND information about it on the internet because we have been so brain washed into thinking a child can only be disciplined in "the approved manner" I know of parents who are literally paralyzed by the thought of disciplining their child and therefore create very dangerous situations. This also means the child will never actually regard their parents with respect. Without respect the parents opinions will be discounted.

3. Now that the stage was set we get the Mass Media and the Government stampeding people into giving up control of their children to the government. The results of the following trials and others lead to all of our present "Daycare Regulations" to "protect the children" and the government now controls the training of you child from infant to adulthood.


"McMARTIN" RITUAL ABUSE CASES IN MANHATTAN BEACH, CA
...The main evidence of abuse was based on what the children testified were memories of repeated, sadistic, ritual molestation. Years later, child psychologists realized that such memories can be easily implanted in children's minds by the interview techniques which were used at the time. Since psychologists and police investigators have changed their methods of interrogating young children, no more MVMO cases have surfaced in the U.S. and Canada. The children's testimony was supported by medical tests, which were believed at the time to be accurate. Years later, they were found to be useless....

Another was THE "LITTLE RASCALS" RITUAL ABUSE CASE, IN EDENTON, NC


In excess of 90 children accused a total of 20 adults with 429 instances of child sexual abuse in a day care center in Edenton NC. Among the alleged perpetrators were the sheriff and mayor. Allegations included a baby killed with a hand gun, a child being hung upside down from a tree and being set on fire.... Robin Byrum, Darlene Harris, Elizabeth "Betsy" Kelly, Robert "Bob" Kelly, Scott Willard Privott, Shelly Stone, and Dawn Wilson were charged with engaging in various sexual activities with children in the Kellys' day care in 1989.

...The out-of-town therapists, who had no such belief system, found no abuse at all: Satanic or otherwise.... As in other cases, the children will be scarred for life by the memories inadvertently planted by the interviewers. ...


Perhaps the saddest case is The Fells Acres case where the greed for political power made a travesty of justice. (I lived in a nearby town) Scott Harshbarger rode the trial to become Massachusetts State Attorney General and was the Democratic nominee for Governor of Massachusetts in the 1998. Harshbarger is also the guy who exonerated ACORN from any alleged illegal activity, in December 2009.


... The children were interrogated not only by their parents but also by police, social workers, therapists, prosecutors, and by pediatric nurse Susan Kelley. The interrogations were highly leading and coercive. Kelley used Sesame Street puppets and had Bert and Ernie plead with the children for "disclosures." ...Refusal to "disclose" was dismissed as "denial.".... The "physical" evidence presented at the trials is now also known to be worthless.

In 1992, Violet and Cheryl Amirault were offered parole. All they had to do was express contrition for their "crimes." They were offered the keys to their jail cells, but refused to use them if it meant confessing to crimes they had not committed.

When the board refused them parole, the trial judge, Paul Sullivan, revised and revoked the women's sentences to time served and ordered them released. In an unprecedented move, the prosecutors appealed the judge's order to the Supreme Judicial Court and won, keeping the women in prison.

In August of 1995, Cheryl and Violet Amirault were awarded new trials by Superior Court Judge Robert A. Barton and the two beleaguered women were finally released from prison. Gerald's bid was turned down. Both decisions were appealed to the Supreme Judicial Court, and on March 24, 1997, the Court refused new trials for all three. In a blood-chilling decision, Justice Charles Fried granted that the trials were seriously flawed. But he decreed that "the community's interest in finality" trumps niggling concerns about justice -- which, presumably, interests the community not at all.

On April 29, 1997, the Supreme Judicial Court refused to review its decision to send the Amirault women back to prison....

Violet died on September 12, 1997, [in prison] steadfastly affirming her innocence. Among her last words were, "Don't vote for Scott Harshbarger."



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 11:26 AM
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What teachers really earn. (OP's title is grossly misleading);

Average Salary for All K-12 Teachers



High School Teacher -$43,355
Elementary School Teacher - $40,432
Middle School Teacher - $42,311
Special Education Teacher, Preschool, Kindergarten, or Elementary School - $41,016
Special Education Teacher, Secondary School - $43,889
Secondary School Teacher - $42,223
Special Education Teacher, Middle School - $42,060


Teacher salaries by state

Average Teacher Salary in Wisconsin


Teaching salaries in Wisconsin have increased since 2007. For example, the average teacher salary in Wisconsin in 2009 was $48,743, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This is a 2.91 percent increase from 2008 in which the average teacher salary in Wisconsin was $47,365. The average teacher salary in Wisconsin increased by less than 1% from 2007-2008, but increased nearly 3% from 2008-2009.

Although it did not increase significantly, the Wisconsin teacher salary rankings actually lowered. Wisconsin teacher salaries ranked 18th in 2007, while in both 2008 and 2009, the Wisconsin teacher salaries rankings fell to 24th in the country. Based upon this trend, individuals can assume that salaries will increase slightly, even if national rankings fall.

Wisconsin teacher salaries are summarized in the Wisconsin Teacher Salary Schedule below:

Average Salary
2009 - $48,743.33
2008 - $47,365.00
2007 - $47,070.00


More links here:
www.teachersalaryinfo.com...

None of these salaries are a path to wealth. Teachers don't go into the profession to get rich. From these average salaries, it puts teachers strictly in the middle class, only the benefits packages keep them from sliding into the lower middle class.


edit on 21-2-2011 by Blackmarketeer because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 11:35 AM
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reply to post by ClearlyAwake
 





When these private schools only except the best, hard working students they can get their hands on, of course they are going to "do better."


When I was in school, I knew of three hard cases who the public schools could not handle. All three were put into different private schools and did quite well and went on to college. One of them had been a friend of mine since we were four. I was the only child he would play with since I would not put up with his bullying. (Yeah I decked him at age four - big brother didn't want a wimp for a sister.)



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 12:05 PM
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My niece (a teacher) sent this to me a few year ago


The Blueberry Story: The teacher gives the businessman a lesson by Jamie Robert Vollmer

"If I ran my business the way you people operate your schools, I wouldn't be in business very long!"

I stood before an auditorium filled with outraged teachers who were becoming angrier by the minute. My speech had entirely consumed their precious 90 minutes of inservice. Their initial icy glares had turned to restless agitation. You could cut the hostility with a knife.

I represented a group of business people dedicated to improving public schools. I was an executive at an ice cream company that became famous in the middle1980s when People Magazine chose our blueberry as the "Best Ice Cream in America."

I was convinced of two things. First, public schools needed to change; they were archaic selecting and sorting mechanisms designed for the industrial age and out of step with the needs of our emerging "knowledge society". Second, educators were a major part of the problem: they resisted change, hunkered down in their feathered nests, protected by tenure and shielded by a bureaucratic monopoly. They needed to look to business. We knew how to produce quality. Zero defects! TQM! Continuous improvement!

In retrospect, the speech was perfectly balanced - equal parts ignorance and arrogance.

As soon as I finished, a woman's hand shot up. She appeared polite, pleasant -- she was, in fact, a razor-edged, veteran, high school English teacher who had been waiting to unload.

She began quietly, "We are told, sir, that you manage a company that makes good ice cream."

I smugly replied, "Best ice cream in America, Ma'am."

"How nice," she said. "Is it rich and smooth?"

"Sixteen percent butterfat," I crowed.

"Premium ingredients?" she inquired. "Super-premium! Nothing but triple A." I was on a roll. I never saw the next line coming.

"Mr. Vollmer," she said, leaning forward with a wicked eyebrow raised to the sky, "when you are standing on your receiving dock and you see an inferior shipment of blueberries arrive, what do you do?"

In the silence of that room, I could hear the trap snap…. I was dead meat, but I wasn't going to lie. "I send them back."

"That's right!" she barked, "and we can never send back our blueberries. We take them big, small, rich, poor, gifted, exceptional, abused, frightened, confident, homeless, rude, and brilliant. We take them with ADHD, junior rheumatoid arthritis, and English as their second language. We take them all! Every one! And that, Mr. Vollmer, is why it's not a business. It's school!"

In an explosion, all 290 teachers, principals, bus drivers, aides, custodians and secretaries jumped to their feet and yelled, "Yeah! Blueberries! Blueberries!"

And so began my long transformation.

Since then, I have visited hundreds of schools. I have learned that a school is not a business. Schools are unable to control the quality of their raw material, they are dependent upon the vagaries of politics for a reliable revenue stream, and they are constantly mauled by a howling horde of disparate, competing customer groups that would send the best CEO screaming into the night.

None of this negates the need for change. We must change what, when, and how we teach to give all children maximum opportunity to thrive in a post-industrial society. But educators cannot do this alone; these changes can occur only with the understanding, trust, permission and active support of the surrounding community. For the most important thing I have learned is that schools reflect the attitudes, beliefs and health of the communities they serve, and therefore, to improve public education means more than changing our schools, it means changing America.

Copyright 2002, by Jamie Robert Vollmer


Sadly, since then, America has burdened itself with the cost of two wars, a financial industry looting that bled this nation of more money, more wealth siphoned off from middle class veins, millions more jobs gone with no national plan to bring the country into the 21st cen energy/technology/job market, leaving it up to the private sector to do this, a private sector dominated by old school way of doing business, which means America will be left to hang itself in the winds of change, as private sector money is increasingly made not in America but elsewhere.

Science? Ha! A nation that for 30 years envisioned itself as an anti-science fundamentalist theocracy. Support for new technology? Ha! We're three decades behind.

At one time about 15 years ago, ex military and business leaders were supposed to go into teaching to change schools. Guess they couldn't hack the job, as they quietly left. My niece said that out of four new teachers who came to her school from private industry to teach, three left (one after four days) as they said they could make more money at their old job for the amount of work. My niece did not get a $5000 bonus last year like a friend's son did at his private sector job.

Maybe health care costs wouldn't be the burden it is if the United States had Medicare for Everyone. Nope, the middle class got robbed of that, too.

This teacher bashing is not about teachers. It seems to me that it has more to do with the continuing downward spiral of middle class economics here. The power play is not, in a globalized economy, to float higher the boat of workers in other countries but to put holes in the American workers' boat so it sinks lower.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 12:19 PM
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reply to post by desert
 


That was a beautiful post.

Bravo!



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 12:25 PM
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Originally posted by ararisq
I don't have a problem with a teacher making this amount of money if they are involved in research and are at the top of their field. If its for someone to show up and chaperon kids for 6 hours, have little educational background, and get several months off during the year then it is a ridiculous proposition.


I have a problem when people equate teaching elementary or high school students to chaperoning. So we are going to do a little math
. Let's just say for arguments sake that teachers are nothing more than babysitters. There are 7.5 hours in a school day X 180 days per year = 1,350 hours. We will take an average class size of 25 students (obviously some classes are bigger/teachers see more students throughout the day and some are smaller). We will pay the federal minimum wage of 7.25 per hour per student (most babysitters/nannies are getting 10-15 per hour). So 7.25 per hour X 25 students=$181.25 X 1,350 hours per year = $244,687.50. So your theory that teachers=chaperon isn't a sound fiscal argument.
And to those that say we should just fire them all and hire a bunch of replacements (scabs). Please stick to your day jobs because your attempts at policy are just embarrassing. Ever wonder why there is a teacher shortage?
edit on 21-2-2011 by madjax because: grammar



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 12:38 PM
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Originally posted by Blackmarketeer
What teachers really earn. (OP's title is grossly misleading);

Average Salary for All K-12 Teachers



High School Teacher -$43,355
Elementary School Teacher - $40,432
Middle School Teacher - $42,311
Special Education Teacher, Preschool, Kindergarten, or Elementary School - $41,016
Special Education Teacher, Secondary School - $43,889
Secondary School Teacher - $42,223
Special Education Teacher, Middle School - $42,060


Teacher salaries by state

Average Teacher Salary in Wisconsin


Teaching salaries in Wisconsin have increased since 2007. For example, the average teacher salary in Wisconsin in 2009 was $48,743, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This is a 2.91 percent increase from 2008 in which the average teacher salary in Wisconsin was $47,365. The average teacher salary in Wisconsin increased by less than 1% from 2007-2008, but increased nearly 3% from 2008-2009.

Although it did not increase significantly, the Wisconsin teacher salary rankings actually lowered. Wisconsin teacher salaries ranked 18th in 2007, while in both 2008 and 2009, the Wisconsin teacher salaries rankings fell to 24th in the country. Based upon this trend, individuals can assume that salaries will increase slightly, even if national rankings fall.

Wisconsin teacher salaries are summarized in the Wisconsin Teacher Salary Schedule below:

Average Salary
2009 - $48,743.33
2008 - $47,365.00
2007 - $47,070.00


More links here:
www.teachersalaryinfo.com...

None of these salaries are a path to wealth. Teachers don't go into the profession to get rich. From these average salaries, it puts teachers strictly in the middle class, only the benefits packages keep them from sliding into the lower middle class.


edit on 21-2-2011 by Blackmarketeer because: (no reason given)


I know that gross quoting is breaking the rules, but I feel that this point needs to be made again. Teachers do NOT make the sort of money that the OP implies by the title of this thread.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 01:22 PM
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i feel teachers deserve good pay and i think they get decent pay. teachers i feel in this scenario are not being responsible and they are not leading by example. our country is in a economic crisis. i feel all government and state paid employees from obama all the way down should take a salary cut til we get out of this mess. that would also include scaling back our military. i am all for restructuring our education system and putting more money into it, buy why throw more money into the way its currently being run? our education system is currently a disater! maybe the best way to do it would be to privatize education and have the government help pay families who cannot afford to send there kids to better school.

sooner or later we are all gonna have to reprioritize our spending, from iphone and outrageous cable and internet bills all the way down to fast food. if we keep living like this we will all have to make over 100, 000 a year just to maintain our materialistic lifestyles.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 01:39 PM
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reply to post by desert
 


Excellent post.

That is a point I've been trying to make for a long time now:

Businessmen should stick to business, something most of them suck at being anyway: just look at the failure rate, no matter what bm (business model ) is used.
They are usually too narrow-guage to comprehend that not everything is a business and it isn't always appropriate to view problems strictly in that light. You can find more reasons outlined in this thread:

Why you should NEVER vote for anyone who promises "to run government like a business."

www.abovetopsecret.com...

But I don't believe in just complaining, so I offer this as a potential step in the right direction:

What would REAL House reform look like?

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Please take a moment and read my proposals, offer your thoughts on how things might change if we adopted them.

And remember, this fight isn't about pay or budgets: it's about bargaining rights!



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 01:47 PM
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reply to post by something wicked
 





While Greek (I presume you mean classical?) and Latin language knowledge is to be admired..... it's not going to get you many jobs is it, apart from teaching the same? To all intents and purposes, they have been dead languages for many centuries....


Actually no those two languages are used as the base for the technical languages in many countries. Medical/bio/law terms are in Latin or Greek they were on the want list for a job my spouse applied for as a technical writer. Latin is the language in which many older technical papers were written. The two languages are also the root of many of the words in several languages and are therefore a good base for learning French, Italian, Spanish and other European languages which is why they used to be a REQUIREMENT in high school.

Latin has allowed my spouse to pick up Spanish very rapidly just by interacting with people at a flea market!
edit on 21-2-2011 by crimvelvet because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 01:50 PM
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Originally posted by apacheman
reply to post by desert
 




And remember, this fight isn't about pay or budgets: it's about bargaining rights!


When the bargaining rights affect the budget, then it is about pay and the WI State budget.
Pretty simple.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 01:58 PM
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reply to post by something wicked
 





I've nothing against the thought of home schooling, but I do think the approach is simplified so much it doesn't really do justice to the effort required.


You are looking at it from the point of view of spoon feeding the information to the kid. The best part of home schooling is teaching the child independence and a thirst for knowledge.

This is what I recommend to my customers after purchasing it and reviewing the material. We use it to tutor some of the neighborhood kids. I do free tutoring on request. My small business is Children's Entertainment.


Review of the Robinson Self-teaching Home School Curriculum

This is an excellent, complete K-12 curriculum for every home school. The only addition needed is Saxon math books. Saxon books are available to RC users at a 20% discount through the Oregon Institute of Science and Medicine, publisher of this curriculum. Everything else comes in the case of 22 CDs. The delivered price of $195 is astonishingly low.....
HomeSchool.org



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 02:16 PM
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Originally posted by crimvelvet
reply to post by something wicked
 





While Greek (I presume you mean classical?) and Latin language knowledge is to be admired..... it's not going to get you many jobs is it, apart from teaching the same? To all intents and purposes, they have been dead languages for many centuries....


Actually no those two languages are used as the base for the technical languages in many countries. Medical/bio/law terms are in Latin or Greek they were on the want list for a job my spouse applied for as a technical writer. Latin is the language in which many older technical papers were written. The two languages are also the root of many of the words in several languages and are therefore a good base for learning French, Italian, Spanish and other European languages which is why they used to be a REQUIREMENT in high school.

Latin has allowed my spouse to pick up Spanish very rapidly just by interacting with people at a flea market!
edit on 21-2-2011 by crimvelvet because: (no reason given)


While I appreciate your points, do you think they are more relavent on a general curriculum than a more modern language - by your example alone, perhaps Spanish?
Spanish is as common to Latin as is English after a fashion, although both have other roots that have since taken the languages elsewhere, which is why we don't speak Latin commonly today.

Actually, very few people if any really spoke Latin as a 'normal' langauge, it wasn't the language of the people even in ancient Rome but was used for academical, judicial use even then (I think if I remember right the actual people spoke what was known cynically as vox vulgaris, basically Italian to you and me)..... take your average classroom, although an appreciation of Latin would never be a bad thing, for the majority, will it enhance their employment opportunities? If you want to move into law or one of many branches of medicine then maybe, but any others? And even with law, it seems if you have a handfull of catchphrases you can be seen as being somewhat educated.

ETA, Spanish is relatively easy to at least understand the basics if you understand English, why do you think Latin assists? Is it the verbal structure? I'd be interested to know how much Latin is required to speak Spanish in a Spanish flea market that a 'learn Spanish in a day' course wouldn't teach (and that is from experience, but more from bar/hotel/business meeting to an extent although I made it clear I was not fluent) than a flea market.
edit on 21-2-2011 by something wicked because: (no reason given)



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