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Bizarre Behavior: Cougars Forming a Pack, Caught on Camera

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posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 12:47 PM
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If you go to any bar in downtown Santa Barbara on a Thursday night it's not unusual to see 8 cougars hunting together, however, not as common in the remote coulees of Washington state.

This trail cam captured 8 cougars together starting to form a pack. The last time such behavior was seen by the extremely solitary animal was in the 1970's when 7 mountain lions were seen crossing a bridge.




seattletimes.nwsource.com...




posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 01:15 PM
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Man, where have you been. Cougars have been forming packs all around us, and even flaunt it - here, have a look:


We don't have them here on the east coast, so I can't say. But, I would suspect that this is unusual. Are they being forced out of populated areas or does it have to do something with the electromagnetic shifting?



posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 01:16 PM
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Well I don't know much about Cougars seeing as I live in Africa. Take it cougars aren't known to be pack animals. Sure there must be some exceptions,though. Animals do weird stuff sometimes.



posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 01:19 PM
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There was a thread on here the other day talking about huge packs of feral pigs as well. Also there was something recently about a wolf pack of 400. These are animals that never hunt in large numbers. Just thought I would add that. Good catch.



posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 01:22 PM
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Did you bother reading the article? They clearly say its not that rare, the rare part is humans being able to see it. Yet you choose to use "bizarre" in the headline anyway. A bit sensationlist probably.

Here, I will help you out:

Cougars — males in particular — are highly territorial and typically roam alone. But it's actually not unheard of for female parents and offspring to coexist. It's been documented here and in the Rockies by experts using radio-collared cats and global-positioning systems.


and...

Gallie's best guess is that the photos show a female cougar with her three kittens and a daughter from a previous litter with her three kittens. Females sometimes set up home ranges near their mothers and have occasional rendezvous.


Not bizarre at all, fairly normal apparently. Cool photos however, thanks for bringing them up.



posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 01:25 PM
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Its kinda like white tail bucks, after they shed their horns after the rut, the bucks all start running together.
I would say that might be the same for some cougars during different parts of the season.?



posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 01:25 PM
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Originally posted by zuul000
If you go to any bar in downtown Santa Barbara on a Thursday night it's not unusual to see 8 cougars hunting together, however, not as common in the remote coulees of Washington state.

This trail cam captured 8 cougars together starting to form a pack. The last time such behavior was seen by the extremely solitary animal was in the 1970's when 7 mountain lions were seen crossing a bridge.




seattletimes.nwsource.com...


Clearly these aren't cougars.. they are chinese lanterns or weather balloons.. nothing to see here..

In all seriousness though, definitely interesting behavior ..



posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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reply to post by zuul000
[

edit on 19-2-2011 by AB173-1970 because: new information



posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 01:30 PM
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Pretty sure a pack of cougars is called a pride just like with lions.

Nature is getting her numbers up to come after man.



posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 01:31 PM
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you folks in santa barbara might want to be extra careful when you go out at night to walk fluffy or scrappy.

also, pizza delivery guys may want to hustle extra fast between the car and the door.




posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 01:33 PM
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Originally posted by alyoshablue
Man, where have you been. Cougars have been forming packs all around us, and even flaunt it - here, have a look:


We don't have them here on the east coast, so I can't say. But, I would suspect that this is unusual. Are they being forced out of populated areas or does it have to do something with the electromagnetic shifting?


Jesus, I already got that joke out of the way in my OP.

Negative Star



posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 01:39 PM
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Originally posted by Pimpish
Did you bother reading the article? They clearly say its not that rare, the rare part is humans being able to see it. Yet you choose to use "bizarre" in the headline anyway. A bit sensationlist probably.

Here, I will help you out:

Cougars — males in particular — are highly territorial and typically roam alone. But it's actually not unheard of for female parents and offspring to coexist. It's been documented here and in the Rockies by experts using radio-collared cats and global-positioning systems.


and...

Gallie's best guess is that the photos show a female cougar with her three kittens and a daughter from a previous litter with her three kittens. Females sometimes set up home ranges near their mothers and have occasional rendezvous.


Not bizarre at all, fairly normal apparently.


Well la-tee-da.

I think you're so caught up in running around marking your territory by pissing all over threads that you felt you had to come in here to "debunk" something that was never "bunked" in the first place.

There was nothing in my OP that assigned any conspiratorial, paranormal occurrence to this - I described it as "bizarre" and that's just what it was ... not bizarre in the sense of aliens from Zeta Reticuli brainwashing the president bizarre but bizarre in the more real-world use of the word.

And, if you read the article - the whole article as opposed to two choice quotes - you'll see there's nothing in there that says it's "fairly normal." Again - there is a whole middle ground between "fairly normal" and "animals about to start an alien-inspired rebellion against humans" that the word "bizarre" accurately describes and the ho-hum of "fairly normal *yawn*" does not.

Negative star for you.



posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 01:41 PM
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Ok, solitary predator,,, to put in perspective another solitary predator would be Grizzly for instance, and when was it last reported a "pack of 12 grizzlies was seen hunting together today" kinda bizarre yes, would make a person think, gee grizzlies hunt in packs now? And yes their cougars a solitary preditor ,,so bizarre yes.



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