It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Is this a Pow-wow, or is it not a Pow-wow?

page: 1
3

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 08:49 AM
link   
I simply love and appreciate Native design and culture, and find it almost eerie how similar tribal bead-work is between our local South African indigenous peoples, and many others from the Americas to Taiwan.
I sometimes wonder how this can be, and whether tribal minority cultures share some kind of spiritual connection across the globe.

In any case I was watching some Pow Wow material, when I stumbled upon a gathering of the Eastern tribes in 2007. I thought some of them were a bit pale. I enjoyed the dancing and costumes, but then I read some really nasty comments under the clip:
- is this even a pow wow?
- it's just "round eyes" and "zhiniis" (whatever that may be)
- they copy "our" ways
- it's disrespectful, but
- also very funny.
So now I'm wondering, was that a Native American Pow Wow, or was it just some kind of farce?

Could somebody enlighten me please!!!
So what is a "real" Pow Wow then?
I mean I really enjoyed it, but the comments were so off-putting!



edit on 17-2-2011 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:03 AM
link   
Being from Oklahoma and having alot of Indian friends of different kinds for a outsider to see a true Pow wow is rare you must be of a certain tribe to go to such a event at least thats what they tell me.
But they do have entertainment pow wows for the public to see. Here they have what they call Red Earth festival where different tribes from across the U.S. get together for the public and show different dances costumes and ways of life, very educational if you ask me.

Red Earth Festival


Guess I totally misread your op and didn't answer any of your questions. It's early and I'm still waiting on my coffee to brew..

edit on 17-2-2011 by Oklastatefan because: No coffee



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:16 AM
link   
Hi Halfoldman- Yes, this appears to be a pow-wow. Each tribe in the US sets it's own requirements on who is entitled to be registered as a member of a certain tribe, including percentage of Native American blood. Here in North Carolina, the Eastern Band of the Cherokee has the requirement of at least 1/16th Native blood. If I were only 1/16th native, I probably would have my round eyes, fair skin and light hair, especially if my other 15/16ths were of northern European ancestry. I probably wouldn't even be recognized as being a native American by anyone. The negative comments you see are most likely due to bias from people who may be full blooded and don't particularly like those who have very little native blood claiming to be one of their own.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:19 AM
link   

Originally posted by halfoldman
- is this even a pow wow?
- it's just "round eyes" and "zhiniis" (whatever that may be)
- they copy "our" ways
- it's disrespectful, but

They may be saying this but, i have always agreed with the old thought that imitation is the most sincere form of admiration.
For these "round eyes and paleskins Etc." to be celebrating the indian heritage they are keeping alive what probably should have been dead years ago.
Ehhh we all look at things in different ways.
But if in 200 years someone speaks of me or emulates the things i hold dear, i have won it seems.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:41 AM
link   
Interesting replies.
Thanks so far everybody!


In any case, before I get accused of being racist or whatever, I thought it's only fair to share a little dance closer to my heart. Like equal give and take.
Here goes: Enzianbaum:
(Bavarian/German dancing)


edit on 17-2-2011 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:52 AM
link   
reply to post by halfoldman
 


Sorry Brother, but there ain't enough beer out there to get me to wear one of those getups and do any of those dances.
I am however willing to try!

I will start immediately and convey my results, unless i get arrested that is.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:55 AM
link   
When I lived in Arkansas, I used to go across the border to OK to the Pow Wow's there. My friend and I. I thought they were really really weird. First off, about 3 of them were in boarding schools. I guess this goes back to when kids were taken from their parents and forced into whitey's way of thinking. Next is the bible reading beforehand. Then there is the Military natives that walk out dressed in full garb carrying the american flag.

Other than all the crazy contradictions, I thought they were fun and actually would like to go again.

Even though I'm white, my mom always said she was a reincarnated native american. She would even dress like one all the time hahaha. My uncle dresses like a cowboy. So riding in between them in the car was a pretty funny sight.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 10:09 AM
link   
This was a bit unexpected - hip hop Pow Wow:



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 10:20 AM
link   
Wow, this a really cool song to hear and see:
Indian Car by Keith Secola:

edit on 17-2-2011 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-2-2011 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 12:01 PM
link   
Nice clips - Pennsylvania Pow-Wow.
From my outside US position that quite surprises me - it is not a state one would associate with Native American culture.
Oh, if I lived in the US, I think I could have met my perfect man there - an extremely beautiful man:

edit on 17-2-2011 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 12:56 PM
link   

Originally posted by halfoldman
Nice clips - Pennsylvania Pow-Wow.
From my outside US position that quite surprises me - it is not a state one would associate with Native American culture.
Oh, if I lived in the US, I think I could have met my perfect man there - an extremely beautiful man:


Shekólih Halfoldman! Pronounced Sheh-Ko-Lee. That would be hello in Oneida, one of the native American languages that used to be spoken in Pennsylvania. I lived in the mountains of northeast Pennsylvania for 18 months and graduated from high school there. The native American history there is rich, but the tribes are basically non-existent now. There are no federally recognized tribes in the state anymore. There are an incredible amount of native American place names in the state though. Minnisink Hills, Mauch Chuck (Sleeping Bear), Analomink (Tumbling water) and Aquashacola (place where we fish with bush net) come to mind. The Indians of Pennsylvania were a major factor in what we call French and Indian War.

I'm surprised, but delighted that you take an interest in Native American culture from so far away in South Africa. I'm very interested in it myself.

Here's a couple of links for you if you want to find out more about Native American tribes in PA:

Indian Attack Story

Native American Tribes of Pennsylvania



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:22 PM
link   
reply to post by tsawyer2
 

Thank you very much - very interesting!



new topics

top topics



 
3

log in

join