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Thousands of dead Jellyfish in Palm Beach county

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posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 11:58 AM
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I just came back from the beach here in Palm Beach, Florida where I found thousands of washed up dying and dead Portuguese Man o' war jellyfish! It looked like a slaughter took place. I've never ever seen anything like that before. Ever!

So within my search to find out WHY they beach themselves I came across an article from down in Pompano Beach (about 25 miles south of here) where this happened last week too!

I left my cellphone (camera) in the car (I don't have a USB cord anyway) so no photos but this photo from last week is a direct duplicate of what the beach up here looks like today!

The article said sheer number of dead jellyfish is rare and that's not counting today's find up here! So now it's gotta be EXTREMELY rare!

And then................the article goes on to say this may be due to the rise of water temperature?????
Do they just make this crap up as they go along? The ocean is 70-degrees. The perfect and proper temperature for this time of year.

Something is still going on with our wildlife folks.






POMPANO BEACH, Fla. -- Beach sweepers were out early Sunday morning picking up hundreds of Portugese men-of-war that washed ashore in Pompano Beach.

On Saturday, beachgoers had to dodge the poisonous seas creatures. Thousands more were floating, alive, in the water.

"I thought they were balloons," said Marcella Gomez.

The neon-colored blobs first arrived Wednesday, prompting lifeguards to raise their warning flags from Hollywood all the way to Delray Beach. Lifeguards said more than 100 people have been treated for stings.
www.justnews.com...
edit on 16-2-2011 by Human_Alien because: spelling




posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:02 PM
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Thats very strange coupled with the mass animal deaths of earlier this year. Im actually surprised I didnt hear of this as I live very near to the beach in Pompano.



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:02 PM
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I wonder if a powerful X-flare could affect jelly creatures... sensitive to X-rays perhaps
.. did the birds die of the same reason.. I wonder



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:11 PM
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I don't like jelly fish ....I want to hear better news ,something like trillions of mosquito's die ...now that I would love ...spring is coming .....peace



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:14 PM
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reply to post by Human_Alien
 


something's VERY WRONG with our planet , forget for a moment "the wildlife"...
damm aliens /reptilians ...




posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:17 PM
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Originally posted by derst1988
Thats very strange coupled with the mass animal deaths of earlier this year. Im actually surprised I didnt hear of this as I live very near to the beach in Pompano.


Ditto. I didn't hear a word about this either but then again, I don't live in Broward county but still.

It was like a mine field. If you walked along the shoreline (like I did) you couldn't help but 'pop' them. I felt so badly because they weren't all dead.

Just weird. That's all. Just plain old weird.

To the poster above regarding mosquitoes? I'm right there withcha! That is the ONLY living creature I ever kill and what's disturbing about that is.....I actually enjoy killing them. If for no other reason then to reclaim my blood that they just sucked from me



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:18 PM
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We've had tons of dead crabs washing up here along the panhandle as well, but I haven't seen any local news reporting on it.

It sure is odd that Manatees are dying because the water is too cold and Jellyfish are dying because the water is too hot, in the same area, in the same water, in the same place they have lived for centuries?
Why do they get away with these ridiculous excuses?

EM? maybe. Lack of Oxygen? more likely. Toxicity from pollution? my best guess.

CloudsintheSky has a Test the Rain project going on, and my first samples have come back, and they tested positive for toxic levels of lead? That was what we least expected. We were looking for petrochemicals and solvents, but we found lead.

Who knows what is killing all this wildlife, but it certainly is not normal or routine, and it isn't because the water is too hot and too cold at the same time, and it wasn't fireworks or lightning or a passing truck.



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:19 PM
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Jellyfish have been washing up on beaches in S Florida for at least the last 30 years (since i've been here).
Jellyfish float on the surface and the tide washes them in. Perfectly natural.



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:19 PM
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reply to post by Human_Alien
 


human-alien , you would be a VERY GOOD REPTILIAN HUNTER!
Give us our blood back you stinkin reptiles !



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 



If you were to guess, what would produce lead in the rain water?

Did any of the dispersant used in the GOM contain lead that you're aware of?

Lead???? That almost doesn't make sense unless that's what some of these non-con trails are up to which, haven't been around for over 2 weeks. Maybe their 'deed' was accomplished and done!?

And WeedWacker in 4, 3, 2, 1..........



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:25 PM
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I can assure you, from living in South Florida for decades (but not in the last 5 years or so), the jelly fish washing up on the beach is COMPLETELY NORMAL!

It happens every year, like clock work.

HOWEVER....

It doesn't happen at this time of the year, not ever. You might see a couple here and there, but when they wash up in mass like this, it's because of temperature changes in the waters. Something has happened that has forced them to move, and that's what is puzzling.

Just wanted to clarify that this is really not in the same vein as the mass animal deaths, because this is explained every year, just at a different time.

~Namaste



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:25 PM
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theres been sooooooooo many mass die offs lately of whales dolphins fish birds toads insects and it seems to be speeding up between intervals...I just can't see the eco system sustaining itself much longer. So basically my advice sould be to Enjoy the good food and weather while we have it folks because i think we just about reached the drop point on the most terrifying rollercoaster ever!!



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:26 PM
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Originally posted by sligtlyskeptical
Jellyfish have been washing up on beaches in S Florida for at least the last 30 years (since i've been here).
Jellyfish float on the surface and the tide washes them in. Perfectly natural.


Exactly.

I posted before I read your comment... sorry about that, but gave you a star for it.


~Namaste



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:27 PM
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reply to post by Human_Alien
 


My water samples came from the mouth of a river where it empties into the Gulf of Mexico, so I suspect it was pollution in my case. The dispersants did not contain lead, and as far as I know neither did the oil.

From what I hear, the Oyster population in our area is doing outstanding, and that is quite an odd development. Since Oysters are filter media, perhaps they like all this pollution? I am somewhat afraid to eat them, but they sure do look big and juicy right now!



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:31 PM
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Originally posted by sligtlyskeptical
Jellyfish have been washing up on beaches in S Florida for at least the last 30 years (since i've been here).
Jellyfish float on the surface and the tide washes them in. Perfectly natural.



It is NOT perfectly normal! Not this amount!! Give us a break with your fair-weather reporting on this matter.
The most I've seen at one time were a few dozen scattered in about a mile stretch. Not thousands scattered within a half mile stretch (that's all I walked today)

I've been in south Florida almost 7 years and have NEVER seen thousands of jellyfish litter the shoreline.

If this was so normal, why report about it then? Do you suppose they ran an article in the Pompano newspaper because there weren't enough gang-related killings to report on that day?



edit on 16-2-2011 by Human_Alien because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:34 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 



Oh, I see. I thought it was a rain test.

Yeah man, I don't know about those Oysters. Personally, I've stayed clear of all seafood since this happened. And seeing I don't eat meat, it's been a very expensive Produce (vegetable) diet I've been on this year! (A head of lettuce for 3 dollars!?) I love veggies but they're getting as costly as Fillet Mignon!



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:40 PM
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Originally posted by SonOfTheLawOfOne
I can assure you, from living in South Florida for decades (but not in the last 5 years or so), the jelly fish washing up on the beach is COMPLETELY NORMAL!

It happens every year, like clock work.

HOWEVER....

It doesn't happen at this time of the year, not ever. You might see a couple here and there, but when they wash up in mass like this, it's because of temperature changes in the waters. Something has happened that has forced them to move, and that's what is puzzling.

Just wanted to clarify that this is really not in the same vein as the mass animal deaths, because this is explained every year, just at a different time.

~Namaste



By your own admission you say the water temperature might've caused this. So? What's going on with that then?
They've attributed the 'water temperature' fluctuation as the MAIN cause of perhaps BILLIONS of sea life deaths since the beginning of the year.

So please. Don't be too dismissive and say this is NOT linked to the bird and other mammal deaths. Because an awful lot of LIFE is dying and there is no way, it's all coincidental.

By the way? The temperature of the ocean is 70-73 degrees. It hasn't waiver too much in months! This report is what's on the Current Condition board as you enter the beach which I do, often.



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:45 PM
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Originally posted by sligtlyskeptical
Jellyfish have been washing up on beaches in S Florida for at least the last 30 years (since i've been here).
Jellyfish float on the surface and the tide washes them in. Perfectly natural.



While yes jelly fish and man-o-war have been washing up on shore for the last 30 years, THIS is not perfectly normal. I have lived within a stones throw from the beach in florida my entire life and have never heard of anything like this going on.

You state that they float on top of the water, while you do not lie, they do have ways to stay away from shore, else it would be their natural habitat.



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:49 PM
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reply to post by SonOfTheLawOfOne
 


But dead birds are common too SOTLOO but 6000 of them at once.

There were at least a thousand jellyfish on the shore today. Not dozens, not scores not even hundreds. Rather a thousand. That's normal? There were more dead fish than sunbathers.

Let's not make light of this because something happened and continues to happen. Never has there been so many reports of dead animals in 6-weeks.

Even if it is the weather then that should still be a concern.
edit on 16-2-2011 by Human_Alien because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 12:50 PM
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I'll say it again....

I grew up in South Florida as well... right off the beach. I surfed for about 15 years in the beaches all up and down the coast line. I promise you, the jelly fish wash up every single year in mass, by the thousands, as far as you can see on the beach. They even have a special man-o-war sign that they put up to warn people to stay off of the beach or else they risk getting stung.

I remember this happening every year closer to the beginning of winter, not the end, so that I will say is strange. Jellyfish go where the temps are mild because they are extremely sensitive to changes, so again, that is what is strange. Why would the ocean temperatures change 2-3 months later than usual?

Anyway, I still don't think this is related to the other birds and animals that have died... that still seems to me like it's either geomagnetic in nature, or chemical. This seems more like a change in ocean currents or fast changes in water temps.

~Namaste
edit on 16-2-2011 by SonOfTheLawOfOne because: typo



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