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Earthquake Swarm in Arkansas Intensifies. Memphis, Tennessee could be epicenter for the next big one

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posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:27 AM
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As soon as I said I hoped they'd stopped and posted. I looked and there's another big one on the webicorder. Over 3+.




posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:30 AM
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YUP...3.4

Magnitude 3.4
Date-Time Monday, February 21, 2011 at 16:17:32 UTC
Monday, February 21, 2011 at 10:17:32 AM at epicenter

Location 35.218°N, 92.362°W
Depth 5 km (3.1 miles) set by location program
Region ARKANSAS
Distances 3 km (2 miles) ESE (117°) from Greenbrier, AR
9 km (5 miles) ENE (76°) from Wooster, AR
10 km (6 miles) NW (312°) from Holland, AR
54 km (33 miles) N (357°) from Little Rock, AR
423 km (263 miles) SSW (207°) from St. Louis, MO

Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 5.6 km (3.5 miles); depth fixed by location program
Parameters NST= 35, Nph= 35, Dmin=10.4 km, Rmss=0.94 sec, Gp=
43°,
M-type="Nuttli" surface wave magnitude (mbLg), Version=5
Source U.S. Geological Survey, National Earthquake Information Center:
World Data Center for Seismology, Denver

Event ID us2011hqbe



And more rolling in. Anyone feeling these?



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:36 AM
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reply to post by westcoast
 


Do you notice that these quakes are to the south of the bulk of the previous quakes? These quakes seem to be hitting downtown Greenbrier.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:40 AM
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reply to post by westcoast
 


More rolling in - going to be an active day.



Interesting conversations this morning - Puterman is doing an excellent job with this thread.. I don't care much for the head butting RedCloak.
I am honestly more interested in what is going on currently - the fracking greatly concerns me and the safety of people in the region.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:42 AM
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reply to post by Robin Marks
 


Well I have been noticing a southword trend this past day or so, which is why I pulled up the louisiana stations. This morning I saw two local quakes (prob 1.0 to 1.2) in Louisiana that didn't show up on the Arkansas stations.

141A and 241A


This last 3.4 quake was back up North again, but showed up strong near greenbriar too.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:43 AM
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reply to post by Robin Marks
 


Have to wait a few minutes Robin as the last larger one they posted thereabout they later moved back into 'the fold'.

If I have time I will try and do a scatter graph by day rather than magnitude which should answer than question. Unless our resident geologist would care to do this?



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:43 AM
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Robin, I started looking into the Enola swarms of 82 and 2001. You probably know this, but they both lasted approximately 40 days. Here's the link www.ceri.memphis.edu...
I will keep reading and pick things out. Anything specific you're looking for?



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:45 AM
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Originally posted by megabogie
Robin, I started looking into the Enola swarms of 82 and 2001. You probably know this, but they both lasted approximately 40 days. Here's the link www.ceri.memphis.edu...
I will keep reading and pick things out. Anything specific you're looking for?


Are these related to fracking?



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:53 AM
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Originally posted by antar
reply to post by westcoast
 


Oh west coast this is so very true, in Missouri I have tried every year for the past 3 to get EQ insurance and have not been able to due to a moratorium on it. I just got word again that I was unable to purchase it from my Progressive policy. I use Farmers for my home, and progressive for my auto, all under Capstone insurers and they have searched for me but were unable to help get it. I will call again tomorrow to ask them more about this if you would like, but yes the last 3 years that I know of there has been a moratorium on purchasing it, there was a grandfather clause for those who already had it but no new policies given.

True. I promise from what I know.



Okay, I just don't understand this.

According to the article I linked a bit back, the government officialls in at least Arkansas have been put through rigorous earthquake training for the past four years. You are now saying that for the past three years there has been a moratorium on earthquake insurance.

Anyone else here smell a rat?? A really BIG one?



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:55 AM
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reply to post by Red Cloak
 


I don't know yet..in that link I didn't find fracking mentioned...still digging though



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:55 AM
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reply to post by BobAthome
 




Here is some information to partially answer your question about the well casings. I am not a driller, deckhand, roughneck, drilling engineer, or anything similar but will share some information I have gleaned from exposure to the industry.

As the well is drilled it is cased with steel pipe. Once at depth the casing should be cemented – that is held in place to the substrate by concrete. I believe the casing segments are welded as they are dropped into the well bore. The casing commonly ranges from just over four inches to about fourteen inches outside diameter. Some of the well bores accept casing up to about twenty inches outside diameter.

The purpose of this casing is to contain the heavy water or mud being introduced during the drilling process and stabilize the sides of the well bore to keep the bore clean.

Once the bore reaches depth, is cemented, and completed, additional tubing may be introduced within the casing. I think this tubing is similar in construction to the casing. Depending on need, several tubes may be put inside the well but my understanding is that for each process there are only two casings – that is there is not tubing within tubing but a tube within the bore casing. That means there should be the structural well casing as well as extraction related tube or tubes of tubing as needed at a specific wellhead.

Wells today are often multilateral indicating that a single main bore is used to reach several subterranean areas. Such wells will have more complex arrays of tubing than the older or more traditionally thought of well.
.


Many of Todays Wells are at Risk



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:56 AM
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I just want to compare events. Fracking is relatively new. But there was conventional gas drilling before fracking. Scott Ausbrook keeps pointing to the Enola quakes and saying everything is normal, swarms are normal. I just want to fact check. Trying to eliminate possible drilling in the Enola case. No drilling, normal. If there was drilling or injection before 1981, then I can forget about it an move on. The Arbuckle injection well to the west of Enola is interesting because it may have been a conventional well pre-1980, and at somepoint was then used for injection. Thanks. Gotta go. Keep up the great work all.

Right now me and my boy are doing some scientific calculations. We're finding out how old we'd be if we lived on other planets. I don't want to live on Mercury. I'd be as old as Professor Farnsworth.
edit on 21-2-2011 by Robin Marks because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 11:05 AM
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Here's something of interest regarding UIC (UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL)

Arkansas was given authority to administer the UIC program as a primacy state in 1982This primacy authority (primary enforcement authority) allows the Arkansas Dept. of
Environmental Quality (ADEQ) to regulate Class I, Class III, Class IV and Class V wells.
The Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission (AOGC) regulates the Class II and Class V
bromine related spent brine disposal wells. Applicable Regulations include: Regulation 17
(Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code) and the Code of Federal Regulations



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 11:05 AM
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This site shows maps and shows a few of the quakes that happent sinc 1699 . Might have been posted erlier, sry if im reposting.
www.geology.ar.gov...

edit on 21-2-2011 by Spacedman13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 11:16 AM
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reply to post by Robin Marks
 


Robin - no drilling or injection around Enola at that time.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 11:16 AM
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Here's another statement about Arkansas and drilling:

Arkla, Inc., through its many morphs, mergers and acquisitions, is and has been a key gas driller in Arkansas. Between 1975 and the early 1980s, the company found more gas than it produced. By 1982, Arkla was able to sell Central Louisiana Electric Company more than 100 million cubic feet of gas daily. By the early 1990s, it operated the sixth-largest pipeline system in the United States and was among the ten largest operators of natural gas reserves. [17] Its production timeline coincides with the massive jump in earthquakes in the 1970s and 1980s. Today, 37 companies drill for gas and oil in Arkansas. [18]

Here's the link www.globalresearch.ca...



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 11:34 AM
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Great thread everyone I've read it from the start as this Fault is important to every one in one way or another . I live in Eastern KY & certainly never look forward to this fault or any breaking loose .
I just found a link and though it might have some of the info you was looking for with the Enola swarms
( about half way down the page ) but not sure how much detail . If it's not I hope it will provide other new & useful info . Continue the great work guys & gals .




www.globalresearch.ca...



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 11:35 AM
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reply to post by kentuckycowboy2
 


Sorry megabogie I hadn't refreshed before posting .



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 11:36 AM
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Here are a few quotes from Arkla's own website:
In 1963 ALG built a new pipeline between its central gas system in Arkansas and new gas fields in Oklahoma.

During the energy crunch of the mid-1970s, ALG had difficulty competing for gas because intrastate companies could pay more, as they were free of federal price controls. Stepping up its own-source supplies was vital, and ALG, between 1975 and the early 1980s, found more gas than it produced. Also in 1975 Nelson persuaded the Arkansas Public Service Commission--regulator of more than half of ALG's gas sales--to institute a new state gas-pricing formula, which allowed ALG to charge higher prices in return for promising better supplies.

By 1976 the company's financial health had significantly improved. It successfully renegotiated contracts at bargain prices with gas producers before the 1978 Natural Gas Policy Act, which marked the start of gas decontrol. In the early 1980s, these contracts accounted for more than 60% of ALG's supplies and allowed the company to offer competitive prices to customer. ALG surpassed $1 billion dollars in total assets by 1979, when Weir retired as chairman and passed that title to Nelson. Earnings were up to $73 million in 1980.

In 1981 the company name was changed to Arkla, Inc. Around the same time, Arkla signed a 15-year contract with Central Louisiana Electric Company, agreeing to sell the company more than 100 million cubic feet of gas DAILY. After federal regulators approved the contract in 1982, it reduced the oversupply that had resulted from Arkla's abundant discoveries of its own and favorable contracts with other suppliers, to the large industrial gas market in southern Louisiana. Arkla was on track.

Sorry to bore you folks with blather about gas companies but it could be showing a link with the previous swarm in Enola. Arkla miraculously found more gas than it could produce?? What's that mean? And where did they find it?

Here's the link if this wasn't enough to put you to sleep :www.fundinguniverse.com...



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 11:37 AM
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reply to post by kentuckycowboy2
 


That's okay Cowboy, the more of us digging the quicker we'll find the truth!



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