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Food Crisis! PRICES SKYROCKET - OVERNIGHT! Mexico and Southwest lose 80-100% of crops! *MSM VIDEO*

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posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 11:44 AM
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Well I guess we are lucky spring is just around the corner then. Ok I would hardly cause this a need to panic and make a run on your local grocery store. Winter will be winding down and new crops will be available in spring.




posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 01:00 PM
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Originally posted by CaptGizmo
Well I guess we are lucky spring is just around the corner then. Ok I would hardly cause this a need to panic and make a run on your local grocery store. Winter will be winding down and new crops will be available in spring.


True, and if you can, plant a garden of your own. Their is nothing like fresh produce. Or, if you have farmers markets in your area. Another good place for bargains and deals from local folk.



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 01:11 PM
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I'm glad I live in Amish Country...

Absolutely fabulous veggies and baked goods...

rev



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 01:25 PM
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news article

www.omaha.com...

"The vegetable shortage can be attributed to a freeze early this month that destroyed more than 60 percent of crops in Mexico, a large supplier of fresh fruits and vegetables to the United States in the winter, Murphy said.

“In our industry, we deal with this every year. There's always a weather issue with something, but what's different this year is Mexico's crops. They haven't seen temperatures this low since 1956,” Murphy said.

where's the global warming when we need it?

Texas cold is requiring ranches to use lots of hay. feral pigs are raiding pastures.
www.chron.com...

if we are having/will have food issues, imagine the potential situations in Bangladesh and elsewhere in Asia, esp urban areas.



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 01:54 PM
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This is interesting, but hardly going to amount to a food crisis in the US. It's only some of the vegetables, and not the ones I eat most of anyway. People who are avoiding salad, because of the price increase, should learn to make braised greens instead. One onion (or half of one) and some cold weather greens like Kale or Chard and a little white wine is all you need. If onions and potatoes were harder to get, that would be worrisome to me. But this is all temporary anyway. I mean, who considers asparagus a staple of their diet?



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 02:48 PM
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Originally posted by AmethystSD
This is interesting, but hardly going to amount to a food crisis in the US. It's only some of the vegetables, and not the ones I eat most of anyway. People who are avoiding salad, because of the price increase, should learn to make braised greens instead. One onion (or half of one) and some cold weather greens like Kale or Chard and a little white wine is all you need. If onions and potatoes were harder to get, that would be worrisome to me. But this is all temporary anyway. I mean, who considers asparagus a staple of their diet?


One can also grow their own garden and have enough for the whole family with a relatively small patch. I do hate to see these things happen, but, living on a living planet in a living galaxy, One has to expect things are going to change now and again. ...



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 02:50 PM
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I have been thinking for years about how tenuous our food supply chain is. This comes as little surprise.

It is a bit ironic that we encounter a food shortage because of a freak frost in the midst of global warming, though.



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 02:53 PM
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Will this affect Europe as well?



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by discl0sur3
 




OK well crop failures should have no effect on what McDonald's serves. Now, if there were to be a major failure at the "synthetic foods division of Monsanto Corp" I'd be out there doing back flips with the rest of the caring and informed world.

Damn. We are soooooo lucky to have Monsanto on our side.



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 04:38 PM
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reply to post by Annee
 


Annee, people (the majority) cant look very far into the future. Its just a human failing.

If we COULD see into the future, we wouldnt have thought 6+ billion people on a planet with limited resources was a good idea. But people are still pumping out babies like there is no tomorrow.

I know every generation has doomsday fantasies, but the convergence of many things, changing climate patterns, economic issues, overpopulation, depleted stocks of minerals, fuels, fishes, all sorts of stuff, dissatisfaction among the lower classes in many places, increasing inequity, all of these things coming to bear on the present moment make it fairly likely that we will see some serious crisis for the species in this century.

The problem is the masses will not see if coming. Until they are actually at the register paying the higher prices they will not foresee them. Nor will they foresee the knock on effects.



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 05:09 PM
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Sorry folks, but most of you aren't as alarmed as you should be. Most of you are focusing on where things are now, but let me tell you... I own a restaurant, and my food bill tells me an entirely different story.

Everything is going. By everything, I mean EVERYTHING. When one item goes up, everything tends to go up.

It's mainly because if three things: The cost of gasoline to deliver the goods, the cost of corn (see: ethanol), and the ever dwindling value of the dollar.

This won't change until enough people wake up. It will only get worse. In the meantime, I've got to explain all of this to my customers. To quote Iggy Pop: " No Fun".



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 05:10 PM
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Originally posted by Illusionsaregrander
The problem is the masses will not see if coming. Until they are actually at the register paying the higher prices they will not foresee them. Nor will they foresee the knock on effects.


I know. And people who actually live in agricultural areas near the border know how important the migrant worker is.

Its like that commercial for "Pace Picante sauce - - - where the other one is made in New York City"

People who don't live here and have no clue keep screaming "close the border". They are clueless to what this means to our food supply. Many Mexican farmers who had farms in the US - - and Mexico - - - have abandoned their US farms and moved their entire operation to Mexico.

People are clueless. Its like "don't look at the man behind the curtain" - - - don't see what's really going on.

Loss of workers and crazy off season freezes - - - is serious stuff.



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 05:17 PM
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Originally posted by VI0811
One can also grow their own garden and have enough for the whole family with a relatively small patch. I do hate to see these things happen, but, living on a living planet in a living galaxy, One has to expect things are going to change now and again. ...


Its not so easy in a high alkaline soil.

But it is interesting how the commercial farmers get around this.



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 05:27 PM
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Originally posted by wheels
Sorry folks, but most of you aren't as alarmed as you should be. Most of you are focusing on where things are now, but let me tell you... I own a restaurant, and my food bill tells me an entirely different story.

Everything is going. By everything, I mean EVERYTHING. When one item goes up, everything tends to go up.

It's mainly because if three things: The cost of gasoline to deliver the goods, the cost of corn (see: ethanol), and the ever dwindling value of the dollar.

This won't change until enough people wake up. It will only get worse. In the meantime, I've got to explain all of this to my customers. To quote Iggy Pop: " No Fun".


Can we say hyperinflation?

I have been telling people that with the flood of magically created money in the last few months, we should expect hyperinflation.



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 05:32 PM
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reply to post by Annee
 


I agree. One of the reasons I moved from New Mexico to Tennessee is because I want to be able to grow some of my own food. Its NOT easy in a high alkaline, clay soil. And water in the SW is iffy in the future.

Growing food in Tennessee is sooooooooooo easy. You just have to deal with bugs. Lots and lots of bugs.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 12:05 PM
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reply to post by Annee
 

Maybe some of us are not buying into the perpetual fear campaign generated by some anymore. The sky is falling, the sky is falling syndrome. Such as the whole dollar collapse in one week or was it one month or was it one year, etc. etc. Maybe it was the whole FEMA camp thing that we were all going to be rounded up and slowly gassed that never happened, or the Chinese troops on the Mexican border and are going to invade scenario that never happened, Maybe the so called X-Planet that would come through and rip the Earth a new one. Maybe the,.......... what was it again...Oh yea...the US will have food shortages and riots will in sue thing...It gets old after a while.

edit on 2/17/2011 by CaptGizmo because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 12:24 PM
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Originally posted by CaptGizmo
reply to post by Annee
 

Maybe some of us are not buying into the perpetual fear campaign generated by some anymore. The sky is falling, the sky is falling syndrome.


There are no facts for the Sky is Falling.

No - I am not a doomsday person. I am a realist.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 12:33 PM
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Originally posted by CaptGizmo

Maybe some of us are not buying into the perpetual fear campaign generated by some anymore.


I dont see why a comment on the FACT that freezing temperatures ruin crops, and the FACT that diminished supply without diminished demand means higher prices, is a perpetual fear campaign.

I personally dont feel fear or anxiety because of it, and if you do, thats on you, not the people writing the posts. FACTS like that can help you plan ahead. For instance, I might get some cold frames going and start my cold weather veggies a little early, in light of the information.

Information is supposed to help you make choices. Not scare the bejeezus out of you. I would suggest that if information causes you to be overwhelmed with fear, to the degree you dont even want to look at information, you need to discover why that is the case.

Looking at your list of fear campaigns I would suggest that perhaps you learn a little discernment. Weather affecting crops and food prices is in a slightly different probability category than planet X destroying Earth. If you give all warning posts the same exact weight regardless of the contents, I can see why you might be fearful all the time.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 12:50 PM
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The weather and the fight against migrant workers - - - is creating a serious problem. People who don't know - - want to close the borders. But they don't understand crops in San Diego were lost to the amount of millions of dollars because crops rotted in the fields - - - due to lack of workers.



No crops have been lost in San Diego due to a shortage of workers. Where on earth did you hear that? At any rate it isn't true. I lve here and I'd know.

What really concerns me is this weather pattern:

Super cold spell, followed by what can only be called a heat wave for February, followed by more hard freezes.

Last year in my area we did lose some crops to a similar local pattern: a series of cold/warm/cold/warm/cold daysets before spring finally took hold. What happened was the first warmth encouraged the plants to begin sprouting, the second cold distressed them a bit, then the second warm spell got a lot of them going well, only to be killed by the third cold snap. It effected them all year, stunting growth a bit.

That appears to be happening on a national scale, and if the winter wheat sprouts toearly, the vast majority of the crop could fail this year, driving all sorts of price increases in breads and grain-using products.

The Chinese situation doesn't help much:


BEIJING, Feb 17: The Chinese government has said the country's worst drought in decades is likely to continue, putting the winter wheat harvest at risk, reports BBC.

The Ministry of Agriculture said the drought had worsened in some wheat-growing regions despite snowfalls. Large swathes of China have had almost no rain since October, affecting millions of hectares of crops and leaving many short of drinking water.

Analysts say crop shortages in China could affect prices around the world.


www.newstoday.com.bd... 0438&date=2011-02-18

Or Ireland:


Tuesday February 08 2011

There is much evidence of field work going on over the last week.

The first rain for months fell last week and with heavily frosted ground, some ploughing might have been better delayed for a short while longer. While there is lots of work to be done, working soil in less than ideal conditions will have an effect on yield.

I would advise caution on sowing winter wheat varieties, especially in the south. These varieties need cold weather for vernalisation and farmers have been caught out in the past. Winter crops that do not undergo vernalisation will fail to enter the reproductive state and will not be able to form a head. Sowing winter varieties in the northern part of the country might still be considered for another two weeks.

In relation to winter oats, some crops, especially Barra, have suffered in the cold weather. It is highly likely this crop was planted in the first place for rotation purposes so it is important that an alternative break crop is considered.


www.ind... ependent.ie/farming/crops/too-late-for-winter-wheat-in-south-but-still-two-weeks-remaining-in-the-north-2529323.html

Or this:


WASHINGTON -- Since July, the price of corn has jumped 62 percent. Wheat has climbed by two-thirds, and soybeans are 38 percent more expensive. For many of the world's poorest citizens, the costs of both basic necessities and things that make life bearable are climbing out of reach: sugar has jumped by 81 percent, tea by 42 percent and arabica coffee by more than a quarter. Soybean oil has risen by half and fuel, overall, is a quarter more expensive than it was this summer.


www.huffingtonpost.com... g-on-hunger-food-crisis-regulators_n_823725.html

I fear we are nearing a breaking point.

Too many seperate but inter-related factors are all going south at the same time.

I've been advising all my friends to stock up slowly while they can for some six months or so now, just in case, because I keep a keen eye on the weather and the climate. I pay attention to what bugs are in my soil and gardens, what birds are in my trees. Last spring I found three or four new bug species I've never seen maround here before: some tiny bright orange guys that came and went quickly, lots of them, a little black midge-like thing, and a ground crawler that looks like a weird ant crossed with something else. Two new kinds of birds showed up: a woodpeckery looking thing with a tuft of feathers sticking out the back of its head and bluebirds. The bluebirds normally live higher in the mountains. Last year felt funny, climatologically speaking.

This year? I suspect it will be wildly variable: just as it is starting out, so it will continue, I think. That will translate into fewer crops, lower yields, higher prices.

If you live in a spot where you can, I'd advise putting in a garden while you can and keep a sharp eye on it. Plant things that complement each other and learn to graze while you work it: the food is freshest and most filling right off the plant, and eating little bits at a time will control hunger better: even if the weather settles down and there are bumper crops everywhere, you'll be healthier, more balanced and weight-proportional that you might otherwise be, so it's worth the effort.
edit on 17-2-2011 by apacheman because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 01:14 PM
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way to go Web Bot project (Cliff High). This is exactly what he predicted. According to his predictive reports this is the beginning. Summer will also have heat that will destroy more crops.
Many will not be able to afford basics in U.S.
There will be struggle for whatever is left.

The only solution is to focus on growing your own crops. Dried food in storage will not have the nutritional value. That is why we are so obese. We eat and eat, our body grows larger but does not have the nutrition so it is basically starving. Fresh food is the solution.



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