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NASA finds Tyche, the 'good sister' of Nemesis/Nibiru/Planet X/Wormwood/Hercolubus

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posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 10:52 PM
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reply to post by Xagathorn
 


The name wasn't changed Nemesis is not Tyche. Tyche is not Nemesis. They are separate objects with very different properties based on completely separate lines of thought.




posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 03:19 PM
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Originally posted by stereologist
reply to post by GoldenFleece
 

No one has said that this is the case except you?
Why are you trying to look bad in front of everyone?

So now you're trying to deny that you claimed the "mystery heavenly body" in the Washington Post article was a "new type of galaxy?"


Originally posted by stereologist
reply to post by GoldenFleece
 

In 1985 the objects were found to be outside of the solar system. Most of the objects were a new type of galaxy.

Do you really think anyone is so easily fooled?



posted on Feb, 20 2011 @ 10:28 PM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 



So now you're trying to deny that you claimed the "mystery heavenly body" in the Washington Post article was a "new type of galaxy?"

I didn't say that either. Telling repeated lies about what I have posted tells everyone quite a bit about you.

The Washington Post article mentions a list of possibilities, one of which was a galaxy. I have already posted links to the peer-reviewed articles discussing the identities of the objects in question.

Here they are again so that everyone can see.

Unidentified IRAS sources - Ultrahigh-luminosity galaxies
THE DISCOVERY OF ULIRGs
edit on 20-2-2011 by stereologist because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 05:29 PM
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reply to post by stereologist
 

The abstract you're referring to mentions "six of the high galactic latitude infrared sources reported by Houck, et al. (1984) from the IRAS survey."

But the article refers to ONE "mystery heavenly body" the size of Jupiter that's 50 billion miles from Earth.

So again I ask, do you actually expect anyone to believe that IRAS astronomers somehow confused ONE dark planet or brown dwarf wandering in our solar system with a distant galaxy that could contain 500 billion stars?

Stereologist, you're just too funny...



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 12:15 AM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 



So again I ask, do you actually expect anyone to believe that IRAS astronomers somehow confused ONE dark planet or brown dwarf wandering in our solar system with a distant galaxy that could contain 500 billion stars?

What a repetitive liar you are! You are nothing but a foul liar and your posts show how poorly you are at telling lies.

There were quite a few interesting finds in the IRAS data. The pathetic article mentions one. What a poorly written article.

The article never ever states that a dark planet or brown dwarf exists. Your repeated efforts to claim otherwise show what a filthy liar you are. Maybe you need to be banned from ATS for trolling.



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 12:51 AM
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well the part i like best is how the pros can not even get it right right? www.nydailynews.com... or this newsfeed.time.com... and then this www.sciencedaily.com... and last from the ones that are to know and find this stuff by taxpayer expense www.jpl.nasa.gov... so there you have three that call it one thing so now to find oh what can it be? www.space.com... ok now just in them links can you count how many names one YES ONE not yelling just big so you can see, object has? you can call me ray or jay or Ralph Fred john Joe Jo or Dave but you do not have to call me MR Johnson. well my take on this one is www.sciencedaily.com...
we do not want to call it this name but we will call it by that name even though it comes from the same place has the same form and everything else we just do not say it is that but say it is
this, and then if you want to see the pictures that are to take a year or more well then explain this www.nasa.gov...


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edit on 22-2-2011 by bekod because: line edit



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 12:57 AM
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reply to post by bekod
 

The space.com article is not talking about the same thing.

Nemesis is a proposed, very massive object, in an orbit of more than 50,000 AU.
Tyche is a proposed, somewhat smaller object, in orbit of less than 25,000 AU.

Two different hypotheses based on interpretations of different data. Apples and oranges and neither one has been shown to exist yet.



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 01:09 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 
i do think you have your articles mixed up just like i do i copied this www.nasa.gov... when i meant to copy this www.space.com... but i think i know what you mean i am just pointing out what they have to say and they are the ones the taxes pay for so they should know right? if they can not get it right then who can, us?


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edit on 22-2-2011 by bekod because: word corection



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 01:30 AM
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reply to post by bekod
 

No. The space.com article is talking about Nemesis. The others are talking about Tyche. Both are hypothetical planets.

As far as I know, my taxes are not paying the salaries of Whitmire and Jackson (Nemesis), and Matese and Whitmire (Tyche). Matese and Whitmire are with the University of Southwestern Louisiana and Jackson is (or was) at the University of Texas. The WISE and NEOWISE missions were not launched to look for either planet, our taxes spent on those projects were to learn a lot more about our universe and to look for objects which may pose a danger to Earth (NEOs). Money well spent. If, in the process, one of those planets is found...cool.

Get what right? These are hypothetical planets. Either one (possibly both) may exist but there is scant evidence.
edit on 2/22/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 02:11 AM
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reply to post by stereologist
 

No reason to get so upset, Mr. Stereologist. I think you've been working too hard. Relax, take some time off...

I've never said that article specifically identified anything. All it says is there's some kind of "mystery heavenly body" +/- the size of Jupiter that's 50 billion miles from Earth (as of 1983.) Now you seem to think a "galaxy" fits that description and have repeatedly said so, even though it makes absolutely no sense how a "galaxy" could be the size of Jupiter and part of our solar system. OTOH, I think an unidentified object that's found by IRAS is much more likely to be a brown dwarf, since they're so difficult to see with conventional telescopes. Now why does that bother you? Isn't that why infrared telescopes like IRAS and WISE are launched in the first place?

I'm sure you wish that article was never written so you wouldn't have to look so foolish trying to convince everyone that a "galaxy" could be discovered in our solar system (which is kinda like saying North America is located in Hoboken), but I think it's important for everyone to understand exactly what you're claiming and realize what kind of "expertise" you possess!



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 02:53 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by bekod
 

The WISE and NEOWISE missions were not launched to look for either planet, our taxes spent on those projects were to learn a lot more about our universe and to look for objects which may pose a danger to Earth (NEOs). Money well spent. If, in the process, one of those planets is found...cool.

Get what right? These are hypothetical planets. Either one (possibly both) may exist but there is scant evidence.

One of the primary reasons for the launch of WISE wasn't to confirm the existence of Nemesis and locate brown dwarfs?

I must've misread the article:


Getting WISE About Nemesis

Summary: Is our Sun part of a binary star system? An unseen companion star, nicknamed “Nemesis,” may be sending comets towards Earth. If Nemesis exists, NASA’s new WISE telescope should be able to spot it.

NASA’s newest telescope, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), may be able to answer the question about Nemesis once and for all.

Finding Dwarfs in the Dark

WISE looks at our universe in the infrared part of the spectrum. Like the Spitzer space telescope, WISE is hunting for heat. The difference is that WISE has a much wider field of view, and so is able to scan a greater portion of the sky for distant objects.

WISE began scanning the sky on January 14, and NASA recently released the mission’s first images. The mission will map the entire sky until October, when the spacecraft’s coolant runs out.

Part of the WISE mission is to search for brown dwarfs, and NASA expects it could find one thousand of the dim stellar objects within 25 light years of our solar system.

Davy Kirkpatrick at NASA’s Infrared Processing and Analysis Center at Caltech found nothing when he searched for Nemesis using data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Now Kirkpatrick is part of the WISE science team, ready to search again for any signs of a companion to our Sun.

Kirkpatrick doesn’t think Nemesis will be the red dwarf star with an enormous orbit described by Muller. In his view, Matese’s description of Nemesis as a low mass object closer to home is more plausible.

“I think the possibility that the Sun could harbor a companion of another sort is not a crazy idea,” said Kirkpatrick. “There might be a distant object in a more stable, more circular orbit that has gone unnoticed so far.”

Ned Wright, professor of astronomy and physics at UCLA and the principal investigator for the WISE mission, said that WISE will easily see an object with a mass a few times that of Jupiter and located 25,000 AU away, as suggested by Matese.

www.astrobio.net...

For a "hypothetical planet" with "scant evidence" to support it's existence, does NASA always focus so heavily on locating "mystery heavenly bodies" (that turn out to be galaxies?)

Dr. Kirkpatrick doesn't sound crazy. I sure hope they don't waste too much time and money on wild companion sun goose chases!

BTW, I've seen many incredible photos taken by WISE, but four months after the mission ended, the only brown dwarf I've seen was an artist rendering!



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 05:58 AM
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Originally posted by stereologist
reply to post by Xagathorn
 


The name wasn't changed Nemesis is not Tyche. Tyche is not Nemesis. They are separate objects with very different properties based on completely separate lines of thought.




...also...



To distinguish this object from the malevolent "Nemesis," astronomers chose the name of Nemesis's benevolent sister in Greek mythology, "Tyche."



-



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 09:17 AM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 



All it says is there's some kind of "mystery heavenly body" +/- the size of Jupiter that's 50 billion miles from Earth (as of 1983.)

There you go again telling what is now amounts to a repeated whopping lie. The article does not state that at all.


Now you seem to think a "galaxy" fits that description and have repeatedly said so, even though it makes absolutely no sense how a "galaxy" could be the size of Jupiter and part of our solar system.

Compounding the lie by making an absurd statement shows that you are nothing more than a troll.


OTOH, I think an unidentified object that's found by IRAS is much more likely to be a brown dwarf, since they're so difficult to see with conventional telescopes. Now why does that bother you? Isn't that why infrared telescopes like IRAS and WISE are launched in the first place?

That is wrong. Neither was launched for that reason.


I'm sure you wish that article was never written so you wouldn't have to look so foolish trying to convince everyone that a "galaxy" could be discovered in our solar system (which is kinda like saying North America is located in Hoboken), but I think it's important for everyone to understand exactly what you're claiming and realize what kind of "expertise" you possess!

Again, making yourself look extremely foolish and misrepresenting the article by repeatedly telling lies tells everyone that you are a troll and possibly a pathological liar.



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 09:18 AM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 



One of the primary reasons for the launch of WISE wasn't to confirm the existence of Nemesis and locate brown dwarfs?

Now you are misrepresenting yet another article. Why is that?



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 09:31 AM
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reply to post by prevenge
 


Thanks for pointing out that an effort was made to distinguish the two ideas.



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 09:52 AM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 


Clearly you haven't looked into the follow-up studies. A quick search will bring you to two articles, one from 1985 and one from 1987, that the authors of the original article published. They state that what they found in the IRAS data were ultra-luminous young galaxies and an infrared cirrus. Just because a Washington Post article wasn't written on these follow-up articles doesn't mean they don't exist. In fact, since the original Washington Post article is so poorly written why don't you go out and find the primary source? If you're going to make claims about what Houck et al. said, maybe you should read their actual words. Besides, even though you have clearly only read the Washington Post article you could clearly see that they claimed the object was not approaching Earth.



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 12:04 PM
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Rather than constantly fight with shills who will say or do anything to disrupt and derail this thread, here's an interesting collection of links about NASA and it's numerous searches for Planet X, Nibiru, Hercolubus, Wormwood, Dark Star, Destroyer, Nemesis, Tyche or whatever they're calling it this week.

Whether Nemesis is actually Tyche, I'll let WISE scientist Davy Kirkpatrick speak for himself:


"We are now calling the hypothetical brown dwarf Tyche instead, after the benevolent counterpart to Nemesis," said Kirkpatrick.

In other words, nothing changed but the name. And remember, this brown dwarf that's had more names than Eskimo snow is still "hypothetical."

Isn't everything named a dozen times before it's discovered?



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 12:26 PM
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i like this statement along with the question Q: Why is the hypothesized object dubbed "Tyche," and why choose a Greek name when the names of other planets derive from Roman mythology?

A: In the 1980s, a different companion to the sun was hypothesized. That object, named for the Greek goddess "Nemesis," was proposed to explain periodic mass extinctions on the Earth. Nemesis would have followed a highly elliptical orbit, perturbing comets in the Oort Cloud roughly every 26 million years and sending a shower of comets toward the inner solar system. Some of these comets would have slammed into Earth, causing catastrophic results to life. Recent scientific analysis no longer supports the idea that extinctions on Earth happen at regular, repeating intervals. Thus, the Nemesis hypothesis is no longer needed. However, it is still possible that the sun could have a distant, unseen companion in a more circular orbit with a period of a few million years -- one that would not cause devastating effects to terrestrial life. To distinguish this object from the malevolent "Nemesis," astronomers chose the name of Nemesis's benevolent sister in Greek mythology, "Tyche." do they think be for they speak?



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 01:07 PM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 

No. Everything changed.

Nemesis is an object hypothesized to be very massive in at orbit greater than 50,000 AU from the Sun.
Tyche is an object hypothesized to be much less massive than Nemesis, in an orbit less than 25,000 AU from the Sun.

Different sized hypothetical objects. Different hypothetical orbits. Different hypothetical influences. Different names.



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 01:21 PM
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ok i am confused:


John Matese, Emeritus Professor of Physics at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, suspects Nemesis exists for another reason. The comets in the inner solar system seem to mostly come from the same region of the Oort Cloud, and Matese thinks the gravitational influence of a solar companion is disrupting that part of the cloud, scattering comets in its wake. His calculations suggest Nemesis is between 3 to 5 times the mass of Jupiter, rather than the 13 Jupiter masses or greater that some scientists think is a necessary quality of a brown dwarf. Even at this smaller mass, however, many astronomers would still classify it as a low mass star rather than a planet, since the circumstances of birth for stars and planets differ.

The Oort Cloud is thought to extend about 1 light year from the Sun. Matese estimates Nemesis is 25,000 AU away (or about one-third of a light year). The next-closest known star to the Sun is Proxima Centauri, located 4.2 light years away. Then there is this
NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, will uncover many "failed" stars, or brown dwarfs, in infrared light. This diagram shows a brown dwarf in relation to Earth, Jupiter, a low-mass star and the sun.
CREDIT: NASA
View full size image

A dark object may be lurking near our solar system, occasionally kicking comets in our direction.?

Nicknamed "Nemesis" or "The Death Star," this undetected object could be a red or brown dwarf star, or an even darker presence several times the mass of Jupiter.

Why do scientists think something could be hidden beyond the edge of our solar system? Originally, Nemesis was suggested as a way to explain a cycle of mass extinctions on Earth

The paleontologists David Raup and Jack Sepkoski claim that, over the last 250 million years, life on Earth has faced extinction in a 26-million-year cycle. Astronomers proposed comet impacts as a possible cause for these catastrophes.?


www.space.com...



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