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Mars has water! should we leave it alone?

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posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 10:22 PM
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Ponder this, what if mars is in its infancy opposite of what many think? What if we hadn't seen water before because the planet itself is just
starting out? Now what if we go and ruin it by putting humans on it,might we just f* up its natural course? We've already ruined the greatest
organism we have ever known, Our own planet!




posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 11:24 PM
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Mars' core isn't hot/spinning enough to create a protective outer layer of atmosphere in which something can live. The Sun scortches everything on the surface.

Mars' isn't going to heat back up or start its core spinning again without some drastic measure or intervention. The atmosphere is slowly stripped away, and creating an artificial one, or finding a way to let the planet keep what it has and collects is the only way life can or will be sustained there.

Floating rocks have no ethical dilemmas, unless you're hurtling them at someone's head.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 11:30 PM
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reply to post by laurosantos
 


No way should we leave it alone. We need more space exploration, and the only way we are ever getting off of this rock is to practice in our own solar system. Who cares about messing with the planet. Its just one small rock among a gazillion. And the benefit outweights the cost.

You are right. We will not be able to live here forever, so lets get out there and figure this whole space travel thing out!

I feel this should be a TOP priority! Take all the money we spend on war and re-focus.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 11:31 PM
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reply to post by Aeons
 


We drain the earth of its blood and it strikes back with earthquakes and crazy weather. Ethical no, but it knows we are here. Gases have existed on the sun throughout its life so I'm sure some organism may exist on mars now or in the future. Not arguing at all just glad you gave me your thoughts.

I love you, namaste'.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 11:38 PM
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reply to post by ATC_GOD
 


I agree. More money for exploration, less for destroying what little we have left.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 11:42 PM
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reply to post by laurosantos
 


The Earth has earthquakes because it has plate tectonics.

It isn't striking at you. Its strikes are all about relieving pressure.
edit on 2011/2/11 by Aeons because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 11:51 PM
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Should we leave it alone? We who? The people? The people have no say in what we as humanity should do. Corporations decide what we should do because they have the funds to make such decisions without the common person knowing any better.

OF course they are not going to leave it alone, they are going to drain that red planet till it has no color. Who's gonna get there first? Not me, not you, the ones who will get there first are the same people who charge us money for a gift of nature that all life depends on to live.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 11:54 PM
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We cannot even leave the habitats of other LIFEFORMS living on our planet.
Leave Mars alone for now until we can count every stone on Earth.
edit on 2011-2-11 by pikypiky because: To correct for proper "spelling and grammar".



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 02:12 AM
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reply to post by Aeons
 


I understand its not striking at me I'm not an oil worker. Never has been an earthquake in any city I've lived in. It's relieving pressure you say hmm, think of the earth as a balloon with an outer layer of paper mache'. Inside the balloon oil,yes? We poke the balloon and release the oil...paper mache' won't stay round forever. Just a theory. I know earthquakes aren't created by drilling, but maybe it is helping them become so frequent?



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 02:32 AM
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According to a variety of whistleblowers, channelers, past life researchers, and ancient writing translators, Mars is a long way from being a new planet! Various ET groups lived there once, same as on earth. That's, like, hundreds of thousands of years ago. Something happened to it at some point and it lost most of its air cover and turned into a giant desert. Similar things have almost happened to earth! (One of the liabilities of depending on planets for your survival.) But no, we haven't left Mars alone. There's an underground base there, apparently manned. That's not a 100% certified fact, but there are several people who would testify to it. It might stay usable in that way for a long long time. One of the channeled stories claims there is a long history of using old planets as shells to build inside of. Some say the large planet-like object heading our way from the south is such a re-used planet. But be that as it may, Mars, for all practical purposes, is our territory and we might as well claim it and utilize it as best we can. There may be brighter answers than this in our longer-term future, but in the near-term Mars could possibly help us solve some problems.



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 03:12 AM
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If there is anything of value to be found on any planet and man can find a way to harvest it... they will.

Damn the ecosystems and the left over carnage. If profit can be made they will attempt anything. Destroy/waste what we have and move on to do the same somewhere else.

Man will never know when to leave well enough alone. Forever seeking something and never quite happy with what they find.

IMO it is sad.
edit on 2/12/2011 by Kangaruex4Ewe because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 07:27 AM
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reply to post by laurosantos
 


Actually a bunch of water has been theorized and pretty much confirmed underneath the surface.

My opinion would be to leave it alone...

That way I can corner the market for my newest product...

H2²O - 4th Rock from the Sun

Proudly proived by Cydonia Springs

A subsuduary of Friggem all industries.

On a serious note no we should not leave it alone. I agree with the others that we need more space exploration. Studying Mars and its enviornment could provide clues or answers to our enviornmental issues. Plus it expands our database of knowledge, so when the time comes to load up the Roadmaster Girzwald 3000 in metalic PeaSoup green and head to Alpha Centauri, we have more than just earth to compare.
edit on 12-2-2011 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-2-2011 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 07:37 AM
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Originally posted by laurosantos
Never has been an earthquake in any city I've lived in.
I was born in a city that was partially destroyed in the biggest known European earthquake, and during my life I have witnessed some seven or eight earthquakes, with the strongest being a 7.3 earthquake, in 1969.

I suggest you get more information about plate tectonics and, directly related with this thread's topic, about Mars.

Everything points to the existance of water on Mars in a relatively distant past, with many signs of water erosion, so I think that the whole idea that Mars is in its infancy doesn't apply to the real situation.

And answering your question about leaving it alone, I don't think we should, I think we should study it the most that we can, but trying to affect it the least possible.

As for exploitation of natural resources, only in extreme cases, and closely monitored.



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 07:38 AM
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I had thought that Mars had a few things working against it , mainly atmospheric pressure and a lack of a magnetic field . So if there was ever surface water it would simply boil off and do to no magnetic field any living thing on the planet would suffer from radiation exposure .



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 07:42 AM
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Oh i can see it now Bottled Pure Mars Water, only for the rich at about 10,000 pounds a bottle lol.

I'll test it to see if its safe



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 07:45 AM
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Originally posted by Max_TO
I had thought that Mars had a few things working against it , mainly atmospheric pressure and a lack of a magnetic field . So if there was ever surface water it would simply boil off and do to no magnetic field any living thing on the planet would suffer from radiation exposure .



I thought I just saw a NASA article that shows, literally, a large pool of water.. I will see if I can find the article, I also thought it was posted somewhere on ATS.

The only thing I would point out is the partabout "any living thing" needs to be put in perspective. Living things as "we" understand life. I think when we finally do get to leave the earth we are going to realize just how much we dont know about life.
edit on 12-2-2011 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 08:40 AM
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reply to post by l_e_cox
 


Thanks



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 08:53 AM
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On one hand we should go to Mars. It has resources that we need. And we need a colony on another planet in case of a mass-extinction event. We also need to spread out much farther then that because if something happens with the solar-system.

On the other hand, going to a planet named after a war-god. And not just any war-god. The war-god of the roman empire. Some of the best warrior in ancient times. When we send out people to live in the home of that war-god, do you think he will look at us with kind eyes? Maybe he will learn us more ancient secrets about warfare. He can teach us much about devastation. That planet could still be the home of that God. And if he is home, we should be afraid.



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 08:55 AM
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reply to post by nidstav
 


saying all of that though, you would still not turn down a chance to go to mars right ? its in humans blood to explore. i'd go if only someone would take me



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 09:11 AM
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reply to post by laurosantos
 


expanding on your What If---well what IF the EPH (exploding planet hypothesis) is correct...

that Mars was once a moon of the theoretical water planet (Vulcan)=(now the Asteroid belt)

and any water on Mars was delulged on the surface in one hughmongous rain lasting 40 days
in that model, Mars was always a dead barren world, with only the microbes from the EPH
surviving for awhile...or even perhaps surviving in small niches in the remaining thin ecosphere
but within the soils instead of the surface.

either model is possible in the 'what if' categories...but the EPH is very much more romantic
and highly stylized, & i'm biased to IT



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