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DNA profiles to be deleted from police database.

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posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 07:41 PM
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Well I have my own views on this and to be perfectly honest I do not see the issue with a DNA database. If you aren't going to commit crime then there shouldn't be a problem? I feel they should take a sample at birth.
If they had peoples DNA on file from birth it would make catching criminals easier for one thing as well as aiding in quickly identifying bodies, missing children etc etc

It would only cause any problem if you actually comitted a crime. To be able to pop a sample in the machine they use and have it scan through millions of files wouldn't affect you as it would only stop at the match.
It still means people are innocent until proven guilty but it also means that finding that guilty person is a lot quicker and easier which, in the case of serial killers for instance, means any further crime by that person is prevented quicker. It would save time which means saving money on lengthy investigations and would free up more coppers to actually walk the street instead of stuck shuffling mountains of paperwork and to-ing n fro-ing in a bid to find out 'whodunnit'.

In my view the benefits of a DNA database outweigh any cons.

Anyway, I'd be interested to hear your views .

Source
edit on 11-2-2011 by ScorpioRising because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 07:47 PM
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reply to post by ScorpioRising
 





I feel they should take a sample at birth.


They already do.


The DNA of virtually every newborn in the United States is collected, usually via a blood sample taken from a prick to the baby’s heel, and tested for certain genetic and other disorders.

Many states view this newborn screening as so important, they don’t require medical personnel to get parents’ express permission before carrying it out. www.momsrising.org...


Also I VERY much doubt the databases are actually purged. What they did to farmers in the Premises ID/NAIS fight was to move the database to Canada where a Freedom of Information Act was not valid.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 07:58 PM
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reply to post by ScorpioRising
 


Cheers for sharing this


Personally, I believe it's about time they deleted the profiles of innocent people - these people have done no proven wrong in law and so, IMO, there is no legitimate rationale for maintaining their information.

I totally understand and appreciate your views on the potential positives of maintaining a national database - there are some definite benefits in doing so.

However, until I can be completely convinced that the data/information couldn't be misused, subject to error or manipulated, I believe this to be a concept more dangerous than we could ever imagine.
edit on 11/2/11 by lizziejayne because: typo



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:02 PM
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You do realise that in Britain they only match ten points in a DNA match?Other countries like Portugal match fifteen.The guys who pionered it in Britan have also said this should be changed to fifteen.Obviously the system isn't nearly perfect and needs adressed badly in Britain,I presume you would be at the front of the line for a microchip inserted in your body?



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:03 PM
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reply to post by crimvelvet
 


That is interesting, at the moment they don't take samples at birth (as far as I know) to go on file in the UK and it looks like now they never will.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:05 PM
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reply to post by lizziejayne
 


Thank you for sharing your opinion in a friendly manner, it is a nice thing that has been missing from many threads lately.
I also understand the mistrust of holding potentially life changing information but I guess I believe that the odds of anything bad happening are low enough to justify having the files.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:08 PM
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Originally posted by lizziejayne
reply to post by ScorpioRising
 

I totally understand and appreciate your views on the potential positives of maintaining a national database - there are some definite benefits in doing so.

However, until I can be completely convinced that the data/information couldn't be misused, subject to error or manipulated, I believe this to be an concept more dangerous than we could ever imagine.


Couldn't have said it better myself.


Also, a thought, criminals and people on probation will buy urine to fake drug tests, so who is to say that people wouldn't try and exploit the national database by either planting DNA to frame someone or make it impossible to actually convict because of a surplus of multiple DNA samples from multiple donors?



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:09 PM
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reply to post by glen200376
 


If it was to be implemented on a large scale (DNA database I mean) then yes it would need some improvement.

You are the 2nd person I've spoken to, to bring microchips into it and I'll say what I said to them. Microchips are an entirely different thing to DNA on a file. They can't track your every move via satellite through your DNA.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:12 PM
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reply to post by Dendro
 


I see your point and all I can say is that there will always be bent police etc so unfortunately it could happen that samples could be manipulated however DNA isn't the only evidence in solving a crime but it sure does help.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:13 PM
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reply to post by ScorpioRising
 


The nothing to hide nothing to worry about argument is just plain silly, unless you have committed a serious crime the state has no right to take your DNA and put it in a database...end of discussion. So im quite glad this is happening.

edit on 11-2-2011 by Solomons because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:14 PM
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What about using the dna data base to create genetically engineered bioweapons.

Personally, I would prefer my privacy in all matters because as the poster above mentioned, these kind
of things are always abused.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:19 PM
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reply to post by ScorpioRising
 


Double post

edit on 11/2/11 by lizziejayne because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:19 PM
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reply to post by ScorpioRising
 


Cheers


I'm in total agreement about the benefits - they could be hugely significant. I suppose I'm possibly more cynical in terms of how the data would be maintained and used. For example, it was not so long ago that government departments were leaving hugely confidential information on trains, laptops in cars etc. While the reference doesn't automatically apply to a national database, as a principle it doesn't fill me with confidence in secure maintenance.

Beyond the security aspects, there are also many examples of - shall we say - less than professional approaches to catching the culprit, sometimes not the right one, "for the greater good". If there's even the smallest flaw in a database system, it would be open to such manipulation.

Additionally, in pragmatic terms, I'm also concerned about how much "weight" would be put on that DNA information. I know that DNA evidence is already a compelling piece of evidence. However, it is one that's used alongside many other pieces of evidence. I worry that any flaws in the process/system (of which there are - at least initially - bound to be many) could result in many innocent victims; simply because of the significance placed on a supposed infallible singular piece of evidence.

Hope that makes sense - it's been a long day and I'm tired

edit on 11/2/11 by lizziejayne because: clarification



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:21 PM
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reply to post by Solomons
 


I am sorry you feel my opinion is silly. I still maintain though that if you are not going to commit a crime then you have nothing to hide.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:22 PM
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reply to post by SnakeShot
 


If they really want our DNA for bioweapons they can get it from any medical treatment you may have had such as blood tests and dental work. Not having a database won't stop that.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:27 PM
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reply to post by lizziejayne
 


It makes perfect sense and don't worry, long day here too..


I'm not saying it should be used as the sole basis for prosecution, I understand that would be foolish, but I do see it as a vital resource in leading to potential correct convictions a lot quicker.


This is a subject that even my friends and I have come to verbal blows over but it is, in my eyes, a topic that should be openly discussed.


Although its late and I'm tired and I'm wondering why on earth I started this thread at such a silly time haha!



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:34 PM
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Originally posted by ScorpioRising
... If you aren't going to commit crime then there shouldn't be a problem? ...


And if you haven't done anything then you shouldn't have been subject to this invasion



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:35 PM
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reply to post by ScorpioRising
 





That is interesting, at the moment they don't take samples at birth (as far as I know) to go on file in the UK and it looks like now they never will.


Check out the link, I think you will find you are incorrect. The article is actually FROM the UK!



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:39 PM
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reply to post by ScorpioRising
 


Definitely a topic worthy of discussion and debate




I'm not saying it should be used as the sole basis for prosecution, I understand that would be foolish, but I do see it as a vital resource in leading to potential correct convictions a lot quicker.


This is where the conspiracy side of me gets going
While I suspect it would start off with such a balanced principle, I believe that human nature and pure momentum would sway the balance of evidence weighting significantly over to what the database has to say. And that's where I get nervous.

What are your thoughts on the security aspects etc?

p.s. Perhaps your mind works like mine - it gets going at the end of the day and goes into overdrive at the time I should be winding down



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:45 PM
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reply to post by lizziejayne
 


I will be honest and say I haven't given much thought to the security aspects which I realise I should have done. I think I would need to look into ways it could be managed but that will have to be tomorrow, I am just too tired to think in depth anymore tonight.

I will spring back in here tomorrow with a smile and either a plan or a white flag! haha!
(sick kids and awol hubby has drained me now, need sleep before I start gibberishing!...)



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