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Could there be a real Judas Strain?

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posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 06:44 PM
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I am just reading a book called, gee I wonder, The Judas Strain. Here is a short synopsis of the book.

From the depths of the Indian Ocean, a horrific plague has arisen to devastate humankind—a disease that's unknown, unstoppable . . . and deadly. But it is merely a harbinger of the doom that is to follow.

Buried deep within a jungle, ancient ruins conceal a deadly secret…Buried in a tomb in Venice, a great explorer hides a truth that could shatter history…Buried in our own genetic code, a mystery like no other… But nothing stays buried forever--and it will be up to Sigma Force to face what will be unearthed: a plague beyond any cure, a scourge that turns all of Nature against mankind. From the high seas of the Indian Ocean to the dark jungles of Southeast Asia, from the canals of Venice to the crypts of ancient kings, Sigma Force must piece together a mystery that, unless solved, will end all life on our planet. But even this challenge may prove too large for Sigma Force alone. With a worldwide pandemic growing, Painter Crowe and Commander Gray Pierce turn to their deadliest adversaries for help, teaming up with a diabolical foe who thwarted them in the past. But can the enemy be trusted even now? Or will they prove to be another Judas?

Basically what happens is the ocean either gets warmer, or more acidic and releases a type of virus that mutates bacteria from beneficial bacteria ( re: yogurt bacteria ) into more harmful bacteria that destroys humans and other animals.

Just wondering if anyone thinks or knows any science behind this...I mean, we are drilling into a lake how many feet down in the antarctic right now and who knows what lives in this lake? Could we be unknowingly bringing about diseases that have not been seen by mankind?

Is this even a remote possibility? Please only respond if you have something intelligent to say...don't contribute to the idiocracy that is rampant here.

Thanks and I look forward to more info/thoughts!!




posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 06:55 PM
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I have read the book. Well in some way it can be possible. The TPTB could have blueprints about this



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 06:57 PM
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reply to post by superman2012
 

Short answer -- theoretically yes. But the scientists are not unaware of the possibility. And if you have to open an alien environment, the Antarctic is probably the best place to do it: isolated, cold, and being opened by professionals. They've read all the scary stories and watched all the scary videos also. Like John Carpenter's "The Thing".



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 07:07 PM
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reply to post by SunSword
 


Cool...and just to clarify...not scared of the possibility and not trying to fearmonger...just wondering if this is a possibility or if the author took alot of liberties. He just presented it well and I did a little bit of websearch about the items that he was talking about.

Thanks!!!!



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 09:41 PM
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sounds like a good book

thanks for posting i'll have to check it out



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 09:07 PM
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Originally posted by superman2012
Just wondering if anyone thinks or knows any science behind this...I mean, we are drilling into a lake how many feet down in the antarctic right now and who knows what lives in this lake? Could we be unknowingly bringing about diseases that have not been seen by mankind?


The danger everyone is worried about is contaminating the lake... not vice-versa (and...er... "everyone" means the scientists rather than anyone else.) The environment down there has been untouched for millions of years. Whatever survives is something that is fairly fragile and hasn't had much experience with outside stressors.

...unlike the rest of the world.

There may be pathogens down there but they would be adapted to the organisms in the lake.

It's kind of like what happened to the Native Americans when the Europeans came in. They were in small groups (on the Plains, a band might number 400-600 individuals but you didn't have 200,000 in one place like you did in London in 1600.) Even taking a wildly optimistic number of 30 million in 1400 AD, Europe had twice that many people, and they were living crowded together in cities. When disease hit isolated groups that didn't come into frequent contact with others and didn't live in crowded conditions with animals that passed zoonotic diseases back and forth, up to 80% of the people died. The Europeans, however, didn't get any diseases from the Native Americans -- they were resistant to a lot of things.

So we are far more likely to wipe out any living thing in that lake (which is what the scientists are frantic about.)

Nor are we lab mice, genetically bred to be so similar that skin grafts and organ transplants can happen between any two individuals you nab -- no rejection drugs needed. We're a real population of mutts.



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