It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Mubarak Steps Down as President, Army Takes Over

page: 8
36
<< 5  6  7    9 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 12:29 PM
link   
reply to post by SLAYER69
 





It is becoming very blatantly obvious to any unbiased observer that the US is being demonized by all sides.


Ya think?

Yea everyone hates us,

However, Obama was pushing him to step down, yes?

apnews.myway.com...
"This is in fact the military taking over power," said political analyst Diaa Rashwan after Mubarak stepped down and left the reins of power to the armed forces. "It is direct involvement by the military in authority and to make Mubarak look like he has given up power."


edit on 122828p://bSaturday2011 by Stormdancer777 because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 12:42 PM
link   
Egypt government officials banned from traveling abroad
Information Minister Anas el-Fiqqi did not board a planned flight to London after new measures announced.

www.haaretz.com...


Egypt's military relaxed a nighttime curfew Saturday and banned current and ex-government officials from traveling abroad without permission in its first moves since taking power after President Hosni Mubarak's ouster.
A Cairo airport official said there is a list of former regime members and current officials with state institutions who are not allowed to leave the country without permission from the state prosecutor or the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces.

The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he wasn't authorized to release the information, declined to identify those on the list. But he said Information Minister Anas el-Fiqqi sent his luggage but did not appear for a planned flight to London Saturday, apparently after hearing of the ban.

These instructions are meant to prevent any people who were in charge in the previous era from fleeing, the airport official said.






posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 12:43 PM
link   

Originally posted by Stormdancer777
However, Obama was pushing him to step down, yes?


Did he?

Interesting article on the whole issue....
In U.S. Signals to Egypt, Obama Straddled a Rift

Seething about coverage that made it look as if the administration were protecting a dictator and ignoring the pleas of the youths of Cairo, the president “made it clear that this was not the message we should be delivering,”....

In fact, Mr. Obama never did take the extraordinary step of publicly calling on Mr. Mubarak to resign....


In fact, some of the differences in approach stemmed from the institutional biases of the State Department versus those of the White House.




"This is in fact the military taking over power," said political analyst Diaa Rashwan after Mubarak stepped down and left the reins of power to the armed forces. "It is direct involvement by the military in authority and to make Mubarak look like he has given up power."


Well the writer has his opinions just like the rest of us...

edit on 12-2-2011 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 12:52 PM
link   
reply to post by Stormdancer777
 

I think the Army probably wants to achieve two different aims by forbidding foreign travel without permission, to government officials.

1. They want to make sure that no-one authorized to control financial instruments of any sort is allowed to facilitate theft from the national treasury or to get away without first coughing up what they have already stolen.

2. They want to round up a few scapegoats to toss to the glorious democratic mob as an act of "good faith" before they attempt return to the business of government so rudely interrupted by "revolution".

I'm not a big fan of the Army. After all, the last two Egyptian dictators were men from their ranks.



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 01:06 PM
link   
I posted this material in a thread in March 2009. It's very conspiratorial. I hate to bring up such a thing when what is going on in Egypt is so obviously a heartfelt move from the people.


All the same, suspicious personalities might find it interesting.

In the old bait and switch game, "the moment" is the time when the switch takes place, when all bets placed by the Obama administration are taken off the table, when the fanged rabbit is finally seen, hanging by his ears above the magician's hat. Now what you see is what you get.

So what is it going to be, this "moment".

Without going into a lot of explanation, I think there is good reason to believe that Obama is not finished in the Middle East. There is a huge US military presence in the Middle East as we all know. Obama is talking about pulling a lot of those people out of the region, but there are people who would like to see one more errand done in the neighborhood before the pullout happens.

Iran.

There is an interesting article on Michel Chossudovsky's website examining the current state of affairs across the Middle East, particularly with respect to Iran's role in the region and the problems it poses for Egypt, Jordan and Saudi Arabia.

www.globalresearch.ca...


The people of the Arab world have longed for a leader to fight for their cause, and Iran has stepped up to the challenge. Moving closer to the US and aligning with Israel's war on the Palestinians is not the path that will secure the dictators of Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Jordan. Instead, reverting to the popular sentiments of the Arab world, and embracing the leadership role on Arab affairs in Palestine and Iraq is what is required to combat Iran and its proxies.


Here's a list of countries that would like to see something done about Iran:

1. Israel
2. The U.S.
3. Egypt.
4. Jordan.
5. Saudi Arabia.

All of those countries are the enemies of Iran and of it's surrogate, Hamas. Among them, the three Arab countries have been portrayed as chumps in the region for not supporting the Palestinians and for doing deals with Israel and the U.S.

Until now there has been a sort of status quo of violence in the region, with Israel, Hamas and the Palestinians being the only participants. Suppose that were to change?

Suppose "Hamas" were to take a crack at one of the leaders of the Arab countries in the list above? Suppose one of these countries' leaders were to be assassinated by "Hamas" or al-CIAda?

An incident like that could serve quite a few people's interests. It could provide an excuse for quite a lot of military activity. It would create quite a lot of confusion in the Arab street, which tends to support Iran and Hamas. It might create quite a lot of solidarity among the five countries listed above and a conviction that now would be a good time to do something about the thorn in their sides.

Obama's moment.

That moment will also, unfortunately, be another leader's moment too. One leader in particular should start being particularly careful. He's the obvious choice in the situation. You don't have to be Sherlock Holmes to figure out who it is. I'll give you a hint. He's not a member of a royal family.

These things are always so surprising when they happen. Shocking. Unbelievable.




posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 01:13 PM
link   
reply to post by ipsedixit
 


speaking if iran

warsclerotic.wordpress.com...

Is this a good source, I don't know.



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 01:21 PM
link   
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


well with that in mind

Also worth keeping in mind: cant find anyone in O admin who thinks whatever comes next will be better for U.S. interests than Mubarak was 8:55 AM Feb 11th via TweetDeck Retweeted by 87 people

jaketapper
Jake Tapper

here's a twitter,
har



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 01:38 PM
link   
Mubarak is a product of the Egyptian Military, who has produced 'leaders' for decades in that country. The military is STILL in charge, as they have bee since at least the 50's. This is not 'change'. It is a fresh coat of paint on a rotten structure.



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 01:48 PM
link   

Originally posted by marinesniper0351
reply to post by searching4truth
 


Lets be smart here, the military did not really interviene in trying to stop the protestors, if they had it would have been a blood bath. This I would wager is not the norm for future protests in the middle east, just look no further than the Iran protests during the last election. The military is in control and in my opinion was a plan to oust him...we will see which way the country moves, my gut tells me LESS FREEDOM...

again my opinion...


Oh I absolutely agree, which is one of the reasons why this situation of drastically different than Iran. The best thing that happened to the protesters was that the military remained neutral, and I agree that not only in the mid east, but globally this is a special and best case example.

While I'll agree that the military could very well have their own aspirations and agenda, I don't think that they are attempting to establish a permanent military dictatorship, but we will see very shortly which way things progress.

I still think that this was a revolution greatly assisted by technology, and it is the same technology that will see them through. If things do not go as planned I see another, even more popular, revolution and global support, and unfortunately quite bloody.

Egypt is also different than Iran in that westerners do not fear it, many have visited, and it has a direct link to our pocket books on a daily basis. People simply care more about Egypt than Iran, bad as that may sound.



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 02:01 PM
link   
reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


Right, but this doesn't say that all Egyptians are prevented from leaving. It is a common move to ensure that in the event previous officials need to be brought to justice they are not seeking asylum elsewhere. At this point, every government office holder is a part of the old regime.



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 02:10 PM
link   

Originally posted by searching4truth
reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


Right, but this doesn't say that all Egyptians are prevented from leaving. It is a common move to ensure that in the event previous officials need to be brought to justice they are not seeking asylum elsewhere. At this point, every government office holder is a part of the old regime.


I understand.



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 02:13 PM
link   
reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


Oh how I hope I they don't disappoint me, I had the way crow tastes



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 02:25 PM
link   

Originally posted by searching4truth
reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


Oh how I hope I they don't disappoint me, I had the way crow tastes


Well I am trying to remain cautiously optimistic, but years of watching the players on the world stage have made me jaded,
trust no one,
sadly I am seldom disappointed.



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 02:27 PM
link   
reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


I know, but I'm eternal optimist. I prepare for the worst, but I keep trying to send "good vibrations"



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 03:26 PM
link   
how are you going to celebrate being "free" when the country is now in a state of martial law?



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 03:29 PM
link   
reply to post by drunkasshole
 


And again........they have been under a state of martial law since the assassination of Sadat. What's your point?



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 03:55 PM
link   
Score one for people power! Congrats to the Egyptian people!!


Now the Egyptian military says they will back "democratic rule" ! Keep the internet free!



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 05:58 PM
link   
Folks, what you already have with mubar gone IS DEMOCRACY! Its mob rule. They need a REPUBLIC.

I hope against hope that they do have it go well for them. My gut says otherwise sadly.


Having educated "westernized" people in the populace means nothing.

The commie Reds only had a small percentage of the population in 1917. They just mobilized it better than the White Army.

I'm reading a book now discussing the revolution via the eyes of someone there. Many of the "educated" felt that Europe would come and save the day. In six years, that will be 100 years ago.

One of you responded to me concerning how the socialists/ communists/ were a player in this. there is a concerted effort worldwide. The PTB desire it. An enslaved populace is easier to control than a "free" one. Revolution in these days equates to a further slide into domination.

be it from capitalism that has turned "predatory" or plain soc/communism. its the same.



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 06:25 PM
link   
reply to post by mayabong
 


This is the problem we do not know for sure and at the end of the day they may put aside their Shia differences and support the Muslim Brother Hood as they would not be US friendly and could threaten trade shipments which means gas, tires...etc...goes up in price...

I do believe Iran likes TMB better than western political figures... : )



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 06:27 PM
link   
reply to post by drunkasshole
 


kinda does not make sense huh...they will not be free until elections are held, the military leave the cities, and the police return to handle domestic issues...



new topics

top topics



 
36
<< 5  6  7    9 >>

log in

join