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Chinese Hackers' 'Night Dragon' Attack Swiped Energy Company Secrets

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posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:36 AM
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Chinese Hackers' 'Night Dragon' Attack Swiped Energy Company Secrets


www.switched.com

Chinese industrial spies broke into a host of energy companies in a coordinated attack that researchers at McAfee have identified and dubbed "Night Dragon" (which is not a sequel to 'The Last Dragon'). The hackers stole proprietary information, including bidding plans for oil and gas field exploration contracts from five multi-national companies that McAfee was able to identify but declined to name.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.reuters.com
www.mcafee.com
kc.mcafee.com..." target="_blank" class="postlink">https:




posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:36 AM
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I was debating whether to put this into Military, Computers, or Gray area, but decided to have it here in Breaking.

This is an interesting cyber attack. It is far and above the level of "script kiddie" although the approaches for comprimising the servers is similar.. the differance is the corporate espionage that happens once things are comprimised.

This would appear to be a professional team of hackers.. possibly run by the Chinese government, but more likely a private data trafficking group.



www.switched.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 2-11-2011 by rogerstigers because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:54 AM
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I feel the most interesting part is the target of the attack. There are some who feel that the deepwater horizon 'accident' was caused by a torpedo from a (possibly) Chinese sub, perhaps this is a sign of things to come?



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 09:02 AM
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reply to post by Loki
 


There are others who feel that it was intentional on the part of Halliburton and it was no accident at all. It would be great if the Chinese "wikileaked" their asses-ets



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 09:03 AM
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reply to post by Loki
 


Perhaps. The problem, also, is that with any weapon, once it gets into the wild, it can no longer be controlled. A classic example is StuxNet, which it turns out was a strategic weapon, but grew out of control in the wild. But then when you are a hired information merc, who cares about such things?



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 10:19 AM
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reply to post by rogerstigers
 
All one needs is money. It could be chinese hackers backed by PRC or chinese/non-chinese employees of the hacked entity or PRC purchased local hackers from within a country or a false claim by the victims. Something we will never know.



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