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Mendeleev crater Anomalies?

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posted on Feb, 13 2011 @ 07:21 AM
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reply to post by drakus
 


I can now confirm that the light was at a 45.97º angle, so whatever is projecting that shadow is not much higher than six metres.

I am trying to find that area on the original image, the image posted has too much contrast, so we may be missing some subtle but important details.




posted on Feb, 13 2011 @ 10:45 AM
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You are searching in that billion-deep pixel image?
Wow.
That's some commitment.



posted on Feb, 13 2011 @ 03:41 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Okay so does that mean you find this interesting ?
I will wait patiently what you might find?

edit on 21/12/2010 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2011 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 


Yes, I find it interesting because it looks like the result of erosion, and without any noticeable atmosphere and no water the erosion is limited to micro-meteorites.



posted on Feb, 13 2011 @ 04:50 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
reply to post by 0bserver1
 


Yes, I find it interesting because it looks like the result of erosion, and without any noticeable atmosphere and no water the erosion is limited to micro-meteorites.

Many of the large exposed boulders on the Moon could have been pieces of ejecta thrown about from the impact of large meteors. The force of the meteor impact could throw these pieces of the Moon miles from the impact site (which would probably be a crater) and leave them littered about on an otherwise flat plane.



posted on Feb, 13 2011 @ 09:24 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


In other terms the micro meteors causing this effect? That it looks eroded?



posted on Feb, 14 2011 @ 08:01 AM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 

Yes.

To me it looks like what happens on Earth, when a harder rock protects the ground below it from being eroded, something like this one.



posted on Feb, 14 2011 @ 12:58 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
reply to post by 0bserver1
 

Yes.

To me it looks like what happens on Earth, when a harder rock protects the ground below it from being eroded, something like this one.

What I'm suggesting in my post above is that large, angular-shaped, fractured chunks of Moon rock could have been thrown to this flat plain on the Moon from the nearby impact of a large meteor, and landed somewhat "upright".

Perhaps a piece of ejecta rock the approximate size and shape of a bus was flung to that spot and lodged itself upright into the lunar soil.



posted on Feb, 14 2011 @ 04:08 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


I understand it, but it doesn't look like one of those cases to me. If it was I would expect it to look more like something stuck on the ground than something that looks like it comes from the ground.



posted on Feb, 14 2011 @ 06:32 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


If you talk about erosion , then you could say that water has to be involved right? but could this be trapped in the early stages , and be a geyser ? like this?



posted on Feb, 14 2011 @ 06:37 PM
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I have to say that its a strange rock formation?. The only clearer answer would be another photograph of this area.



posted on Feb, 14 2011 @ 06:43 PM
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Regarding erosion, one of the more interesting real "anomalies" discovered by lunar exploration was that the dust on the Moon's surface is relatively thin. Of course, just like with the Earth, the Moon is exposed to space and all the dust floating around up there, and tons of it continuously rains down on the Moon, just like it does on Earth.

On Earth, though, all the dust either burns up in the atmosphere, or it's incorporated into the earth/water/air renewal cycle. But on the Moon, there's really nothing to recycle it. So several billions of years of dust have fallen on the Moon, with nothing (supposedly) there to move it around. It should simply accumulate on the surface, deeper and deeper. But that's not what you find.

That's why I've sometimes wondered if maybe there wasn't some kind of "space wind" mechanism that the Earth, Moon, and maybe the entire Solar System periodically swings through that scours off a lot of the accumulated dust. I don't think it's a solar wind, because that would take a lot of energy. A really powerful magnetic field that would "suck" the iron-filled lunar meteorite dust up in some way? I wonder.



edit on 14-2-2011 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2011 @ 07:35 PM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 


No, there are not signs of water or wind erosion.



posted on Feb, 14 2011 @ 07:38 PM
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reply to post by Blue Shift
 


Do you know about "Moon fountains"?



posted on Feb, 14 2011 @ 07:45 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


never knew that existed ? Sounds logical.You think thats the most logical explanation of what we see there?



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 08:03 AM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


I understand it, but it doesn't look like one of those cases to me. If it was I would expect it to look more like something stuck on the ground than something that looks like it comes from the ground.

I was thinking that as a chuck of Moon rock/ejecta from a meteor impact re-impacted the Moon after being thrown from the meteor site, it would "spread out" at the bottom, creating a cone-shaped rock that is wider at the bottom and more narrow at the top.

I think this could be more likely if the heat created upon meteor impact caused the ejected Moon material to be partially melted (but not fully melted). Perhaps like in a "plastic" state.

Think about taking a cylindrical-shaped piece of very soft clay and dropping it from a height, long-way first. As that soft clay cylinder hit the ground, its bottom would be spread out from the force of impact, and the resulting shape would be cone-like.


edit on 2/15/2011 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 10:48 AM
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There is another type of erosion that happens on the Moon: Thermal erosion.

Rocks on the surface get exposed to two weeks of sunlight, during which their outer surfaces heat-up to ~200 degrees (F). Then comes two weeks of night, when they cool-off to ~200 below zero (F). The heat expansion & contraction of the affected rock causes cracks to form. Also, the temperature differential beween the thermally-variable exterior and the basically stable interior can cause fracturing.

Over the eons, millions and then billions of these thermal cycles will crack and crumble lunar rocks from the outside inward, leaving the remainder sitting in a growing pile of debris. The individual fragments that spall-off also break-down into smaller pebbles until there is little left visible but dust.

Apollo 12 & 14 found some good examples of very thermally-eroded boulders:

AS12-46-6822
AS12-46-6824
AS12-46-6827
AS12-48-7062
AS14-68-9414
AS14-68-9450
AS14-68-9487



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 02:09 PM
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Sorry I can't see anything interesting here im afraid



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 02:28 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
Do you know about "Moon fountains"?


I seem to recall reading something about those a while back. I can see where that might account for some very fine-grained dust being picked off the surface, but not the larger stuff. I guess it also has that potential for dust to gain escape velocity because of the lower gravity, like it's also supposed to do on Mars.

Still, I think some advanced alien race comes along every once in a while and cleans all the planets. If not, they'd all be thick with dust in just a couple billion years.



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 06:49 PM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 


No, from what I can see, I think the most logical explanation would be either erosion from micrometeorites or Soylent Green Is People's idea, now that I finally understand it.



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