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Water flow on Mars! NASA Scientist says.

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posted on Feb, 13 2011 @ 09:05 AM
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reply to post by TheSparrowSings
 


this is a panoramic view or angle of the hebes chasma:


and "slope streaks" are clearly seen cascading down to a catch basin.and following this trail it continues to meander for about 90 kilometers.



and gets to the deepest part of this chasma @-4600 El.(yellow circle)
there must be cracks along the way and if "water" in liquid and flowing form once existed knowing that water also seeks the lowest resistance or level the area circled in yellow line is very interesting area indeed.





posted on Feb, 13 2011 @ 09:57 AM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


Should humans ever be in a position to walk on Mars,they'd need sun block?

I think I read of a huge meteorite smacking into Mars many billions of years ago and almost breaking it up...does anyone else know of this?



posted on Feb, 13 2011 @ 10:42 AM
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reply to post by Ericthedoubter
 


i think carl sagan made a great presentation on this in his tv series/books "Cosmos" and "Broca's Brain" too.


edit on 13-2-2011 by alphaMegas because: add info



posted on Feb, 13 2011 @ 03:23 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 




I've never met one person who believes there's any intelligent life in our solar system


Why don't you ask here on ATS?

Well, you have just found The First One that belives there's more than one intelligent life in our solar system: ME!


Any other?



posted on Feb, 13 2011 @ 03:28 PM
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Originally posted by alphaMegas
reply to post by TheSparrowSings
 


this is a panoramic view or angle of the hebes chasma:


and "slope streaks" are clearly seen cascading down to a catch basin.and following this trail it continues to meander for about 90 kilometers.



and gets to the deepest part of this chasma @-4600 El.(yellow circle)
there must be cracks along the way and if "water" in liquid and flowing form once existed knowing that water also seeks the lowest resistance or level the area circled in yellow line is very interesting area indeed.



Commonly we can call these as RIVERS & LAKES.

Stars!



posted on Feb, 13 2011 @ 03:32 PM
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Originally posted by Arken
Commonly we can call these as RIVERS & LAKES.

Funny, I only call them that when they have any liquid.



posted on Feb, 13 2011 @ 07:25 PM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur

Originally posted by G.A.G.
Is mars becoming closer or more distant from the sun, as time goes by?
If you're wondering why liquid water on Mars is less abundant now you provided your own clue, and it's not the distance of Mars from the sun:


without a heated core like earth, any liquid water may not stay in liquid form very long at all.
Yes, it's got something to do with the heated core, Mars lost its magnetospere about 4 billion years ago, when it still had that abundant liquid water was possible there:

en.wikipedia.org...


Mars lost its magnetosphere 4 billion years ago,[91] so the solar wind interacts directly with the Martian ionosphere, lowering the atmospheric density by stripping away atoms from the outer layer.
So the solar wind probably carried away a lot of, but not all, of the water on Mars, after it lost its magnetosphere (which would have resulted from a molten core).


The lack of a magnetosphere and extremely thin atmosphere of Mars are a challenge: the planet has little heat transfer across its surface, poor insulation against bombardment of the solar wind and insufficient atmospheric pressure to retain water in a liquid form (water instead sublimates to a gaseous state).
So that's probably why it doesn't have liquid water today, because of the loss of the molten core, not because of the distance from the sun, though the distance from the sun could have played a minor role...though I'm not sure about that. I know the Earth is moving away from the sun about 15cm a year, but I'm not sure if Mars is also. But I'm pretty sure the loss of the magnetosphere is the primary reason Mars lost much of its water, and atmosphere.
edit on 12-2-2011 by Arbitrageur because: fix typo


As far as I know the current thinking is that Mars still has something of a magnetosphere and something of a molten outer core, if so it could have some liquid water by default at some depth. There is also current thinking on widescale heating of the planets in our solar system abeit by a not necessarily known source but the sun would do for a start,

news.nationalgeographic.com...

Mars liquid outer core,

www.sciencedaily.com...



posted on Feb, 14 2011 @ 10:31 AM
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Originally posted by Arken
reply to post by Arbitrageur
 




I've never met one person who believes there's any intelligent life in our solar system


Why don't you ask here on ATS?

Well, you have just found The First One that belives there's more than one intelligent life in our solar system: ME!


Any other?


count me in, in fact i want to introduce to you folks, my favorite martian


and he's only one of "them" there...
sorry but this is no cgi, just taken from mars google...



posted on Feb, 14 2011 @ 03:22 PM
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reply to post by alphaMegas
 


That is CGI, because you zoomed too much and the software is creating what it thinks should be there.

That's I always look for the original photos.



posted on Feb, 14 2011 @ 08:42 PM
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Originally posted by Arken
Well, you have just found The First One that belives there's more than one intelligent life in our solar system: ME!
I'm not sure about dolphins or whales, they might have some type of intelligence we don't fully appreciate yet, but I specifically said not on Earth.

Where else besides Earth might one expect to find any complex life forms in our solar system?

I think there's widespread belief that other life is possible in our solar system, including Mars, and several moons of other planets, but that the conditions there, and on Mars in particular, might at best support some type of very small, simple, extremophile type life form, so that it would not be an intelligent form of life.

I suppose it depends on how one defines intelligence too, but I'm thinking along the lines of SETI type definitions where the species is capable of building radio transmitters, etc. and though we've seen interesting radio transmissions from the outer planets, there's no confirmation they are from any kind of intelligent species.



posted on Feb, 14 2011 @ 08:48 PM
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Originally posted by smurfy
As far as I know the current thinking is that Mars still has something of a magnetosphere and something of a molten outer core, if so it could have some liquid water by default at some depth.
I have little doubt that liquid water could exist at some depth on Mars, in small quantities.

I was careful to say it lost most but not all of its water, and yes it has a tiny remnant of an atmosphere just like it has a tiny remnant of a magnetosphere, but both are a tiny fraction of what they once were, which is precisely why we see evidence of large water features with no evidence of large bodies of water.



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 05:42 AM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 



Where else besides Earth might one expect to find any complex life forms in our solar system?


Life is everywhere in our solar system. Different from our conception and our biology. But there is life.

As we experiencing on our little planet, everywhere there is the possibility to grab hold, the Life blooms and grows!

Like in the darken and deep oceans, near volcanos to highest temperatures, under some kilometers of Ice and in the more barren and hostile deserts.

In billions of years an unicellur life form that it has fought in an absolutely extreme atmosphere and it has generated mankind...

Maybe we are an UNICUM.
Remember that Oxigen it is a poisonous gas!

The normal is carbon dioxide CO2.



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 10:30 AM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
reply to post by alphaMegas
 


That is CGI, because you zoomed too much and the software is creating what it thinks should be there.

That's I always look for the original photos.


when i found intriguing images here, there are at least 4 things i take into consideration.
perspective, orientation, elevations, and of course the possibilty that we are not the only ones...zooming in too much or less is just part of the process, the fact is the images are there.
i found the idea of "them" existing besides "us" in this vast universe to be very repugnant (un acceptable to folks who are deeply religious and there's a good thread about this in other theads so i wont philosophise it here) rather here are some more images for ats'ers to scrutunize...
in this image you may notice that the dominant image is the dark shadow...



but then if you really take a good look you will find these images...
i1186.photobucket.com...
i1186.photobucket.com...
i1186.photobucket.com...
i1186.photobucket.com...


shadows, rocks , people? pick your choice....
edit on 15-2-2011 by alphaMegas because: add photo

edit on 15-2-2011 by alphaMegas because: add info



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 07:16 PM
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Originally posted by alphaMegas
when i found intriguing images here, there are at least 4 things i take into consideration.
perspective, orientation, elevations, and of course the possibilty that we are not the only ones...zooming in too much or less is just part of the process, the fact is the images are there.
When I find interesting photos there are several things I take into consideration:
1 - things related to the camera
     - is it a digital or a film camera?
     - if it's a film camera, is this the best reproduction available
     - if it's a digital camera, is this the closest to the original photo
     - if it's a digital camera, what's the resolution (harder to know with film cameras, the resolution can only be known for the negative)
2 - things related to the conditions in which the photo was take
     - direction from which the light is coming
     - angle from the camera to the target (perpendicular to the target or a more oblique view?)
     - possible external interferences (other objects between the camera and the target, atmospheric conditions, etc.)
3 - things related to what can be seen
     - differences between dark areas and shadows
     - differences between brighter areas and well lit areas
     - possible optical illusions
     - are there other photos from that area?

The possibilities that we are or are not alone in the universe are irrelevant for what can be seen in the photo, but they can affect our interpretations. Zooming in too much is just useless, it only shows how the zooming algorithm works. Trust me, I have made at least two of those myself.


in this image you may notice that the dominant image is the dark shadow...



but then if you really take a good look you will find these images...
i1186.photobucket.com...
i1186.photobucket.com...
i1186.photobucket.com...
i1186.photobucket.com...

shadows, rocks , people? pick your choice....
Shadows on a cliff.

(zoomed to 200% percent, but with no resampling)


As we have at least two photos that show that area we can make a little animation to try to get an idea of the tridimensionality of the scene.



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 08:16 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP

Originally posted by alphaMegas
Shadows on a cliff.

(zoomed to 200% percent, but with no resampling)


As we have at least two photos that show that area we can make a little animation to try to get an idea of the tridimensionality of the scene.



shadows,may very well be, but not on a cliff.they are in the crater bed...lodged in that mound...
a thing to consider as "perspective" so it wont be hard to orient oneself where your location is in relation to your surrounding...
that was aload of techie data bout cameras...thanks



edit on 15-2-2011 by alphaMegas because: add photo



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 05:34 PM
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reply to post by alphaMegas
 


I called it cliff because I don't know what to call the "wall" on that "stepped hill".



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 09:14 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
reply to post by alphaMegas
 


I called it cliff because I don't know what to call the "wall" on that "stepped hill".


i think "the wall" will fairly describe it...



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 12:18 PM
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reply to post by TheSparrowSings
 


TSS,
here's another interesting slope streak
www.abovetopsecret.com...

and a lot to"sing" about



posted on Aug, 4 2011 @ 03:53 PM
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another link to back up the theory

www.bbc.co.uk...



..."This is an exciting possibility for those of us studying salt-loving (halophilic) micro-organisms here on Earth, since it opens the possibility that these kinds of hearty bugs may also inhabit our neighbouring planet," he said...


i've never had a doubt that we are missing a lot that mars just hasn't yet told us, we may not be looking in the right places, or asking the right questions in the wrong places, who knows but it definitely supports the theory that life exists beyond this little rock!



posted on Aug, 4 2011 @ 04:35 PM
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No space probe carries film, all images are digital, how else would we get them?

The only film cameras ever used on a terrestrial body other than earth were used by the Apollo astronauts.



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