It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Mubarak stepping down tonight/transfers power didn't step down/Steps down Feb 11,

page: 33
64
<< 30  31  32    34  35  36 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:28 PM
link   

Originally posted by Phantom28804
I hope this is the end of the protesting and all that. I fear for the people of Egypt now though. The idea of having the ruling party step down without someone to take his place set up just worries me. It provides a good opportunity for someone to take the country by force or for the Muslim Nationalists to take over. Then Egypt will be a far worse place then it is now, and unfortunately Dictatorships and Theocracies are much harder to stand up to. They are more likely the types to shoot first and never ask questions.


Absolutely not, they reached the point of no return, they must see it through to the end now, no matter the consequences. This is what separates the men from the boys.




posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:29 PM
link   
The protestors need to stay on the peaceful path they are on - but when you have this many angry people anything can happen. TPTB know this and are waiting and ready to pounce at the first opportunity.



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:30 PM
link   

Originally posted by MindSpin
reply to post by backinblack
 



Many countries run without functioning Governments for months with NO issues..
You are just making BS excuses to leave a corrupt leader in power..


I have no interest who is in power in Egypt.

Just pointing out that people are oversimplifying things...as is often done on ATS.


It seems like solutions are always so easy when ATSers come up with them....but the real world doesn't work like that.


The simpliest and most efficient way to solve this mess is the one Mubarak said: he stays in his place until september, the elections are held and a new democratic government is elected.
This would be the most efficient and secure way to solve the problem, also considering the way the army wants to do this is using the "organized retreat" way of doing, which, from my point of view, has sense.
But it doesn't seem Egyptian people want to accept this way to do it.



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:30 PM
link   
i am proud of these people willing to give anything to incat change for themselves, and wether they know it or not they are empowering a world at the same time.

as for the people who think they have the right to suggest the protesters are doing something wrong, i think you need to relise how important this really is to these people, and come down off your high horse just long enough to relise that maybe just maybe the 3 million people huddled together screaming might just know what they are screaming for better then you.



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:31 PM
link   
The real tell will be after Friday Prayers tomorrow



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:33 PM
link   
It's fine...you can all ignore me or call me a troll and continue to blindly call for the protestors to take action...that is only going to get them killed. So...good job?


All I am doing is asking questions...and it appears the answers to those questions are getting you guys upset.


The problem I see is that if they do what the protestors want...they leave a void...and then it is a power struggle to fill that void. Now if the protestors had a leader that they were rallying around and wanted him to take power...that is a whole different story...but that is not the case. They have NO ONE to take over.


And all of you saying "Well, the military will just keep the peace until elections are held."....who is going to be in charge of the military? Whoever that person is...is going to have a lot of power all of a sudden...and what if he doesn't want to give it up? Or what if he decides that he knows the best person to take over and places them in pwoer?


How about you guys start thinking about the real life implications...this isn't a game...the protestors aren't there for your entertainment...you should all be encouraging them to THINK before the take any type of action.

But I guess that isn't fun...you seem like more of a freedom loving patriot if you just encourage them to live by the "give me liberty or give me death" motto. :shk:



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:33 PM
link   

Originally posted by kache

Originally posted by MindSpin
reply to post by backinblack
 



Many countries run without functioning Governments for months with NO issues..
You are just making BS excuses to leave a corrupt leader in power..


I have no interest who is in power in Egypt.

Just pointing out that people are oversimplifying things...as is often done on ATS.


It seems like solutions are always so easy when ATSers come up with them....but the real world doesn't work like that.


The simpliest and most efficient way to solve this mess is the one Mubarak said: he stays in his place until september, the elections are held and a new democratic government is elected.
This would be the most efficient and secure way to solve the problem, also considering the way the army wants to do this is using the "organized retreat" way of doing, which, from my point of view, has sense.
But it doesn't seem Egyptian people want to accept this way to do it.


What so he has time to manipulate the situation and end up remaining in power? Or, for him to get all the video coverage and hunt the citizens down involved with the protest and kill them. No. He must go. Anything he says is to delay and keep the status quo, the citizens recognize this. So, waiting and voting him out is out of the question. The only option the people are giving him is to leave.



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:35 PM
link   

Originally posted by MindSpin
It's fine...you can all ignore me or call me a troll and continue to blindly call for the protestors to take action...that is only going to get them killed. So...good job?


All I am doing is asking questions...and it appears the answers to those questions are getting you guys upset.


The problem I see is that if they do what the protestors want...they leave a void...and then it is a power struggle to fill that void. Now if the protestors had a leader that they were rallying around and wanted him to take power...that is a whole different story...but that is not the case. They have NO ONE to take over.


And all of you saying "Well, the military will just keep the peace until elections are held."....who is going to be in charge of the military? Whoever that person is...is going to have a lot of power all of a sudden...and what if he doesn't want to give it up? Or what if he decides that he knows the best person to take over and places them in pwoer?


How about you guys start thinking about the real life implications...this isn't a game...the protestors aren't there for your entertainment...you should all be encouraging them to THINK before the take any type of action.

But I guess that isn't fun...you seem like more of a freedom loving patriot if you just encourage them to live by the "give me liberty or give me death" motto. :shk:


I agree with you, my friend.



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:35 PM
link   
To those who are criticizing the protesters for their apparent lack of a game-plan...
How many of us have never made a risky decision with the hopes of bettering our lives? Be it a career choice, or a choice in a relationship, or some other life-altering decision, we've all (I'm sure) had to put ourselves on the line at one time or another. Sometimes, it just has to be done. They say "look before you leap," and, usually, it is wise to do so, but I think there are obvious times when the leaping must come first, because the time it takes to look may be time given to the enemy.
That's what it is in the Egyptians' case. I agree that not having a plan is potentially irresponsible, as a nation, but settling now would, in my opinion, be potentially fatal. They do know what they want: they want the oppressive regime gone and they want to have their lives back. They won't settle for less than this, and I don't believe they should settle for less.
The problem is, they should've had a solution before they began. Now that they're in this deep, though, there's no turning back. They should keep peacefully opposing anything short of a complete removal of the Mubarak regime.
I'll admit, it is a dangerous situation, concerning the lack of any public-backed successor, but why should that danger keep them from their goal? They've proven that they are not cowards. They want their lives back, and they should stand firm. It may be a rocky road ahead, if Egypt is left with no ruling body, but I think the people have shown their remarkable ability to support each other and work as a single mind. These aren't people incapable of ruling themselves while their government is in transition... these are people who should have the opportunity to rule themselves for the first time in 30 years.



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:36 PM
link   
reply to post by kache
 


I agree...that is the most logical thing to do at this point.


But apparently we just don't "get it".


I honestly think some on here just want to see blood so they can then cry about how the governemnt FORCED them to violence and killed innocent people.



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:36 PM
link   
reply to post by kache
 


Aha theres BILL

the trio is complete.



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:38 PM
link   
reply to post by MindSpin
 




I noticed you didn't bother to address any of the questions.

Because no one here has specifics...people here on ATS just want to see action just for the hell of it...without forethought on the consequences.


You are totally wrong that people want to see other people suffer "just for the hell of it." Dead wrong.

Many of us stand with the Egyptain people because of the corruption in our own governments, many of us stand with the Egyptain people because we would like to see them succeed from a dictatorship of brutal control. I could go on and on about how many of us here on ATS, who are not as new as you are support the people of Egypt because they deserve the same human rights as the rest of us - not because we want to see their blood spilled. How dare you even make that statement. It just goes to show that you are trolling.

The specifics have been laid out for you, you refuse to acknowledge what people write and refute it completely - another sign of trolling. There are protest leaders who want to lay out a new constitution, and lead the country out of it's dictatorship - haven't you watched the news? Haven't you seen the interviews? Where have you been?


Isn't it strange that the majority of the world is with the people of Egypt, but you are not?
You are entitled to your opinion, but you are not entitled to troll.

edit on 2/10/2011 by kroms33 because: u



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:38 PM
link   

Originally posted by SkewedWhat so he has time to manipulate the situation and end up remaining in power? Or, for him to get all the video coverage and hunt the citizens down involved with the protest and kill them. No. He must go. Anything he says is to delay and keep the status quo, the citizens recognize this. So, waiting and voting him out is out of the question. The only option the people are giving him is to leave.

After what happened these days he won't try to manipulate the situation: he perfectly knows that if he did it he would get killed or worse.
There is no problem with the video coverage: as Al Jazeera is showing the national Egyptian television is giving extensive coverage to the rebellion.
Regarding the hunt: c'mon, do you really think he can hunt down MORE THAN 5 MILION people?
He won't do anything. He already decided to retire and, as a good soldier, he will carry this plan on until the end.



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:39 PM
link   
reply to post by MindSpin
 


If the citizens do not want Mubarak in power, do you really think that they would allow another group of tyrants in power? No, they wont, and if that were to happen, the people would be right back out on the streets. The people know what they want and do not want. Having a vacant government for a short while we be ok, as long as the military backs the people, and so far, the military has behaved exceptionally well.



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:42 PM
link   

Originally posted by CLPrime
To those who are criticizing the protesters for their apparent lack of a game-plan...
How many of us have never made a risky decision with the hopes of bettering our lives? Be it a career choice, or a choice in a relationship, or some other life-altering decision, we've all (I'm sure) had to put ourselves on the line at one time or another. Sometimes, it just has to be done. They say "look before you leap," and, usually, it is wise to do so, but I think there are obvious times when the leaping must come first, because the time it takes to look may be time given to the enemy.
That's what it is in the Egyptians' case. I agree that not having a plan is potentially irresponsible, as a nation, but settling now would, in my opinion, be potentially fatal. They do know what they want: they want the oppressive regime gone and they want to have their lives back. They won't settle for less than this, and I don't believe they should settle for less.
The problem is, they should've had a solution before they began. Now that they're in this deep, though, there's no turning back. They should keep peacefully opposing anything short of a complete removal of the Mubarak regime.
I'll admit, it is a dangerous situation, concerning the lack of any public-backed successor, but why should that danger keep them from their goal? They've proven that they are not cowards. They want their lives back, and they should stand firm. It may be a rocky road ahead, if Egypt is left with no ruling body, but I think the people have shown their remarkable ability to support each other and work as a single mind. These aren't people incapable of ruling themselves while their government is in transition... these are people who should have the opportunity to rule themselves for the first time in 30 years.


Do you understand that in the case of a power void there is a huge risk that an extremist muslims group will take power?
Would you take such a huge risk?



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:43 PM
link   

Originally posted by kroms33
reply to post by Mr Tranny
 




It is only silly when you have lived your life with no responsibilities beyond your own daily life, and just have a “I want it and I want it now” lifestyle. When you don’t know the stuff that goes on behind the scenes that makes the day to day world possible. When you have actually went through and had the responsibility of maintaining the world around you, building something from scratch and finishing it through to completion, and being responsible for other people’s lives, then it is not a silly question. Not a silly question at all.


In essance you seem to be calling these people - the protesters, spoiled. How out of touch with reality are you?
Were the people who formed the United States of America spoiled? How dare you.

They don't live a "I want it now" lifestyle - the majority of them are poor and repressed. You get that lifestyle from the corporations and wealth of the USA, your needs are met - theirs are not. You can not compair or even speculate what these people have gone through, because you have never looked into the face of the world around you - from your postings, I can tell.



It is something the protesters do not comprehend.

When we deal with a change of power in a government of a country, we need details. DETAILS!!!!!!!! DETAILS!!!!!!!!!


You have the details, they want to be free from the evils of a represive government through the imposition of democracy. What is wrong with imposing democracy? Where is your logic and reasoning so flawed that you can not comprehend what they are trying to do in Egypt? People reading your statements, families gathered around computers everywhere want to know the answer.



The only details I have seen is from mubarak. The protesters just have “wants, wants wants!!!!!!!!”

The protesters are being incredibly short sighted on this, and something is driving that short sightedness from the outside


The only details we know about you is either you can not comprehend the world around you - or you are trolling this thread. I believe the later, because I still have a bit of hope for you... slim hope.

As for the protesters being short sighted - I think they are actually looking for some long term goals, such as a government that doesn't abuse them and one that lets them speak their minds... kinda like the one you and I live under. Gee, what a concept.


Sure the protesters are looking for a government that doesn't abuse them... Don't you too? Because you seem to forget that most western citizen do also feel quite abused by their current governments.

I really don't know who is the short sighted here... Sure it would be so nice to think all that is happening over there is just as it's presented on the new. Here in Spain mass media is making a big deal of all the Egypt "thing". The problem is that I can tell you what I lived myself... and I'm telling you, after watching what Mubarak said, this is EXACTLY the same thing they did in '89 in Romania. For some reasons we don't see right now they are fueling this "revolution". In the next hours, in fact it's quite possible that the so far pacific revolution would become very violent. This would give a good reason to US or UN, to come over and take control. Or it'd give a good justification to military to set a military government. Anyway those that look like going to loose is the Egyptians, and again, I feel very sorry for them.

Not saying that it's no point in taking down a corrupt government and fight it... but when you see that suddenly the US, that has been big friends with Mubarak for so long is actually on the side of the protesters, the protesters should understand they are wrong. They really need to cool down and solve this with some elections and no matter what keep the it as non-violent as possible for as long as possible.



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:45 PM
link   
reply to post by kache
 


It's not for me to decide to take that risk. It's up to the people living this reality, and they seem to have decided that the risk from that is less than the risk from allowing the Mubarak regime to continue for another 7 months.
edit on 10-2-2011 by CLPrime because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:46 PM
link   

Originally posted by kache

Originally posted by SkewedWhat so he has time to manipulate the situation and end up remaining in power? Or, for him to get all the video coverage and hunt the citizens down involved with the protest and kill them. No. He must go. Anything he says is to delay and keep the status quo, the citizens recognize this. So, waiting and voting him out is out of the question. The only option the people are giving him is to leave.

After what happened these days he won't try to manipulate the situation: he perfectly knows that if he did it he would get killed or worse.
There is no problem with the video coverage: as Al Jazeera is showing the national Egyptian television is giving extensive coverage to the rebellion.
Regarding the hunt: c'mon, do you really think he can hunt down MORE THAN 5 MILION people?
He won't do anything. He already decided to retire and, as a good soldier, he will carry this plan on until the end.


Sorry to say, but your views are delusional, this world does not work that way. He has not "decided" anything, he is running out of options. I just hope Mubarak and company runs out of options before the citizens do. And yes, he would hunt them down, he has done it before, he may not get all of them, but he will get a lot of them. And then, if he stayed, he could start replacing their army to be more cooperative to him and less to the citizens. The people cannot give him time to plan and execute anything or anyone, as long as the people are in the streets, it keeps him pinned down.
edit on 10-2-2011 by Skewed because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:46 PM
link   


After what happened these days he won't try to manipulate the situation: he perfectly knows that if he did it he would get killed or worse.


The situation is already manipulated! You are watching a show here... wake up!



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 05:47 PM
link   
This is a tragedy in the making, in so far as how much more messy and violent this is now likely to become due to the vast mass marches and national strikes already planned for tomorrow by the revolutionaries.

With mass confrontations at additional venues (e.g. presidential palace...) and the context of national strikes to key services such as TV and so on imminent tomorrow, this is really likely to flare up, polarise the nation and drag in a military response of force. I really feel great sorrow for those directly affected.

This could so easily turn into a nasty civil war that will destabilise the region, and from which the nation is tipped into years of conflict....

I just can't see either side gaining a quick resolution now, although it's so hard to know the real balance of power from external MSM. If only by some miracle a rapid victory/transition could be secured, I'm hoping for that miracle.



new topics

top topics



 
64
<< 30  31  32    34  35  36 >>

log in

join