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SCI/TECH: The Future With Climate Change.

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posted on Jul, 14 2004 @ 04:52 PM
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Sir David King, the UK's chief scientific adviser stated "the most recent science bore out the worst predictions" of climate change. According to King, there is more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than in the last 55 million years, which is enough to melt all the ice on the planet and submerge cities like London, New York, and New Orleans.
 



Melting ice: the threat to London's future
An ice core 3km deep from the Antarctic had a record of the climate for 800,000 years and showed the direct relationship between the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and warm and cold periods for the planet.

Critical in climate records is the quantity of ice at the poles and in glaciers. Records show that at the peak of the ice age 12,000 years ago, the sea was 150 metres below where it is now. "You might think it is not wise, since we are currently melting ice so fast, to have built our big cities on the edge of the sea where it is now obvious they cannot remain.

"On current trends, cities like London, New York and New Orleans will be among the first to go.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


In the article it is also mentioned that ice melting is speeding up and that when the Greenland ice cap goes the sea will raise 6 to 7 meters (19.7-23 feet) and when the Antarctica ice cap goes it will raise another 110 meters. (360.9 feet)

According to records they have found 3 km deep in the core of the Antarctic, it shows that carbon dioxide during ice ages was around 200 parts per million, while during warm periods it was at 270 ppm, before going back again to another ice age.

During the 1990s carbon dioxide in the atmosphere was at 360 ppm, and right now it is at 379 ppm. King concluded that climate change is the biggest problem that manking had to face in 5,000 years. He also mentioned in the article that althou global warming has killed more people than the war and terrorism, as in the death last year of 25,000 people due to a heatwave, that this problem has not recieved almost any attention at all.

Althou some scientists differ on the consequences that global warming will bring, it could be possible that the Earth will try to balance itself by making some regional colder areas while other regional areas become warmer, they all agree it is not good news for civilization.

Related News

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution: Abrupt Climate Change

NOAA: Abrupt Climate Change.

Evidence of Abrupt Climate Change



df1

posted on Jul, 14 2004 @ 06:02 PM
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Science appears to be your true forte Muaddib. Rapid climate change is definitely a more significant issue than terrorism and merits 10,000 times more attention than the beheading of day. Keeping shoving the information at ATS till folks start paying attention.

Can you add any information on the how the coastal cities plan on dealing with the impending climate threat?

Do you have any sources on how this may impact inland cities around the great lakes?

Will the increased melt lubricate fault lines causing an increase in earthquakes? I have no sources but recall reading such a few years ago.
.



posted on Jul, 14 2004 @ 06:05 PM
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welllll
we all know one day everything is propley going drown a horrible death

light the ice caps melting and stuff like that



posted on Jul, 14 2004 @ 06:48 PM
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An interesting read indeed. Is this just a part of the life cycle of the Earth? I know some believe that the Earth itself is living and will do what is necessary to rid itself of pests that are depleting it of it's natural resources.
They do say, after all, history does repeat itself.



posted on Jul, 14 2004 @ 07:39 PM
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Originally posted by df1
Will the increased melt lubricate fault lines causing an increase in earthquakes? I have no sources but recall reading such a few years ago.
.


It is my understanding that if the oceans rose 300ft the resulting pressure on the ocean floors would trigger massive earthquakes and volcanism all over the world. Moreover, a ten degree increase in the average ocean temperatures would create hypercanes and cause rainfall for FORTY DAYS & NIGHTS. I refer you to www.icr.org...

Hope the link works I'm not good at this e-stuff.
For more good stuff on climate change and the effects I would recommend Graham Hancocks books on precession, "Fingerprints of the Gods" and "Underworld". The man does a fantastic job of pulling things together to show cause and effect over the last 25,000 years and when you've finished, you can understand the consequences of today's climate anomalies.

There also was a great article on polar reversal in the NY Times on 7/13, "Will Compasses Point South?" It had some great images of the current state of the magnetic fields and they didn't look good. Dr. J. Tarduno felt that the effect of the magnetic disturbance would be barely noticeable. But we know that indeed a great many people here at ATS have noticed. I think that the time has come for the Scientific Community to take notice , explore the consequences, and report to the common people. We are very concerned, with the technological effects, the climatic effects, and all the subsidiary effects. I really believe that people can handle the truth about their world. I think that if the gov'ts and scientists keep trying to ignore these issues the social consequences will be as bad as their worst case scenarios predict.
hOPE



posted on Jul, 14 2004 @ 07:55 PM
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Quoted from source article:

Dr King described how the ice caps like those on Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania, had been continuous for hundreds of thousands of years and survived through successive warm periods but were now expected to disappear in 30 to 40 years.

She said that the government had set ambitious targets for 2010 and beyond for virtually every big environmental issue.

There's little reference here to the time these events are expected to occur, and I've heard many different dates

Of course all these things can be prevented....thus altering the dates, so I suppose it's not an easy scientific statistic to develop.

Does anyone know what the best educated best guess is so far, assuming we go on ignoring this issue?



posted on Jul, 14 2004 @ 09:17 PM
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df1, I actually think that i do a pretty decent job at bringing as much information as is available in all issues, including if the information is not what most people in the forums agree with.

I do agree with you that abrupt climate change should be one of the issues that our administration should be watching, not just terrorism.

It took me sometime to see these responses, as I was gathering information for another topic.

I haven't heard or read about any contingencies to deal with the possibilities coastal cities are caught up in climate change/severe floods or severe weather from climate change. This is one of the reasons many scientists are trying to bring this topic to light, because there are almost no contingency plans, except for FEMA's regular plans, to evacuate people and deal with perhaps large amount of people being exiled for long periods of time from coastal cities, or other areas affected by climate change.

Also the world's agriculture is based on the false assumption that climate will remain as it is now for a long time. Any major changes in weather patterns will destabilize agriculture all over the world.

We can see right now how inland cities and regions are being affected by climate change. For example the extreme differences we can find in the Mid West, some parts are affected by the worse drought in over 500 years, while other areas, in some cases adjacent to the drought regions, are experiencing the opposite extreme. In the case of the continuing 3 weeks(?) of rain, if it has stopped, in some areas also in the midwest US. This is not just happening in one place but all over the world.

As to dates when this might occur... well the US Navy is making plans to secure a new sea saying that by 2015 the Artic will become a new navegable sea while others say that it will take longer. Present figures put the possibility is very high these changes will happen within a decade, althou some other sources say it will take a couple of decades or perhaps more.

But evidence has been found that we have had past abrupt climate changes that have occurred within a decade, and that in one case the change increased dramatically within three years.

As I have said before, it is true that the Earth goes through these cycles and they are normal. The problem is that this time around human activities seem to have increased and worsen the effects of the current climate change. There is not question about it. Climate change is already under way, how long it will take for "the boat to reach a point where it will completly flip" is everyone's guess.

[edit on 14-7-2004 by Muaddib]



posted on Jul, 14 2004 @ 10:17 PM
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My partner & I have applied to emigrate to Canada for assorted socio-political reasons. In choosing a new hometown, we decided to take global warming into account, hoping not to have to re-migrate in our old age due to climactic changes. The Canadian government actually has some websites dealing with various aspects of climate change. I'm not sure of their veracity or value, but it helped pick an area to move to.

www.climatechange.gc.ca...
www.ec.gc.ca...
climatechange.nrcan.gc.ca...
www.hc-sc.gc.ca...

I just registered for this site after lurking a good long time, so please excuse my inability to put the links in properly. I live in NE Washington state, after living in Seattle for 37 years. The climate here ranges from 25 below to 110. There is constant risk of wildfires, pine beetles infest lots of woods, and full logging trucks run non-stop to the local mill.

--Saerlaith



posted on Jul, 14 2004 @ 11:28 PM
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Your links are fine Saerlaith - Welcome to ATS! Sounds like some well-thought-out moving plans - I wish I could plan my every tomorrow that well


Here in Tallahassee, the weather's been crazy too - it's normal for ust to see some bad rain most days of the week for a brief moment or two, but it hasn't stopped with the daily never-ending thunderstorms here for more than month....not to mention the panhandle had a black out due to the incredible heat index yesterday....I wanna move to Canada!!

Originally posted by Muaddib
As to dates when this might occur... well the US Navy is making plans to secure a new sea saying that by 2015 the Artic will become a new navegable sea while others say that it will take longer. Present figures put the possibility is very high these changes will happen within a decade, althou some other sources say it will take a couple of decades or perhaps more.

That's incredible! Not only are we ignoring our own environmental needs, but we're planning for its demise......

A say this knowing full and well that these events are natural and must be planned for in a modern society, but there is so much we could do to delay it....

I think we may be nearing the end of the Holocene...here's a really interesting academic article that touches on some of the major environmental events during this epoch...
The Holocene
Here's an interesting quote from that source:

The fire frequencies associated with the droughts of the 'Mediaeval Warm Period' are only half as great as those recorded during the early-Holocene insolation maximum. Model results suggest that the temperature increases associated with the insolation maximum are a good analogue for those expected with global warming. If this is the case, future droughts may be more severe than any experienced in the last several thousand years, and these data should be considered in planning for future change.
Source



posted on Jul, 14 2004 @ 11:53 PM
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Well so far this climate change hasnt done anything for the Atlantic hurricane season. It looked like it was ready to pop a few weeks ago and then things went dead, I wanna see how this reported climate chae will affect that. I am in central Florida and it was been extremly hot and dry for the past week, right now its mid night and still feels like 90. I havent noticed anything strange weather locally, our T-storms have been strong at times but nothing I havent seen before, though the global satellite loops like all global weather systems are moving at a faster rate than I ever seen, I not sure but thats what it looks like to me.



posted on Jul, 15 2004 @ 12:06 AM
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Originally posted by jrod
Well so far this climate change hasnt done anything for the Atlantic hurricane season. It looked like it was ready to pop a few weeks ago and then things went dead, I wanna see how this reported climate chae will affect that. I am in central Florida and it was been extremly hot and dry for the past week, right now its mid night and still feels like 90. I havent noticed anything strange weather locally, our T-storms have been strong at times but nothing I havent seen before, though the global satellite loops like all global weather systems are moving at a faster rate than I ever seen, I not sure but thats what it looks like to me.


I live in South Florida and can't stand being outside, even my dogs prefer being inside rather than outside. I can't get them to walk outside for long anymore. As for the Atlantic hurricane season...well, the season just begun and althou we haven't seen anything major form in the Atlantic there has been pretty bad weather in South America. I reported part of what is happening there in the following thread.
www.abovetopsecret.com...

[edit on 15-7-2004 by Muaddib]



posted on Jul, 15 2004 @ 10:17 AM
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From what I can tell, the area I've picked to live will not have as drastic of temperature changes as most parts on north america. And though it's near the ocean, it's on a fairly protected inner channel, hopefully safer from tsunamis and hyperstorms. The only downside is that it's on an island, so if/when petrol is restricted, we'll need to be ready for being marooned. Where I live now is slated to become a desert over the next decade.

I've also been researching garden plants and small livestock that are hardy for warmer temps, looking at building a house that gathers rainwater from the roofs, and general, low-level self-suffiency type stuff.

Saerlaith



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